Cat Has Had the Time of His Life

    thin line

    Our Daily Bleed...



-- ARCHIVES TO CLEAN UP, 3211:

http://www.bcpl.lib.md.us/~cbladey/guy/html/main.html FAWKES http://www.kidlink.org/KIDPROJ/MCC/11.5.1.html


-- SUBTERVISE “They’re all just a load of alcoholic anarchists.”

— Christopher Chope (Roads Minister 1990-1992) http://www.subvertise.org/
http://www.eco-action.org/dod/

-- JAN KRZYWICKI (b.1948): String Quartet, Starscape for Solo Harp, Trumpet Sonata, 4 Songs after Rexroth for Mezzo-Soprano, Harp, Piano & Percussion. Krzywicki's music is overtly emotionally expressive, & the composer seems to have a predilection for shadowy, tense & mysterious themes. The quartet has something of the nature of an in memoriam work, having been written shortly after Krzywicki's father's death. Harmonically rich, it is nevertheless a tense, edgy work, with little sense of repose, even when the music is slow. The nocturnal & mysterious atmosphere of Starscape is also present in the Rexroth songs which combine a profound sense of atmospheric stillness with a feeling of uneasy calm. The trumpet sonata focuses on the instrument's lyrical capabilities, eschewing its fanfare-sounding capabilities in favour of a more somber mood. Unusually moving & involving music. Colorado Quartet, Mary Ann Coppa (harp), Terry Everson (trumpet), Susan Nowicki (piano), Emily Golden (mezzo). Albany TROY 337 (U.S.A.) 09B085 $16.98

http://www.recordsinternational.com/RICatalogSep99.html



-- J. William Lloyd was an anarchist, a poet, writer, doctor, editor of Free Comrade, & wrote for Benjamin Tucker's "Liberty". He was known as the "drugless physician."

The natural man; a romance of the golden age. by Lloyd, J. William Benedict Prith, publisher Newark, N.J. 1902 140p., first edition, spine darkened, signed by Lloyd, printed at the Alwil Shop, Ridgewood, New Jersey. Anarchist utopian novel.

By 1900, however, the taboo had been challenged by a generation of sex reformers, & communities both directly & indirectly devoted themselves to social & sexual liberation. In the forefront were anarchist colonies that de-emphasized the traditional family unit. J. William Lloyd, the anarchist editor of Free Comrade & author of the utopian romances The Dwellers in Vale Sunrise & The Natural Man, organized a group in California's San Fernando Valley in 1904. Though not formally a community, Freedom Hill (named for Lloyd's estate) served as a center for literature about "homogenic love" & nature.

Anarchists' March. Tune: Bjorneborganes Marsch (Finnish War Song). Words by J. Wm. Lloyd. Price, 10 cents.

Heroes of the Revolution of '71. A souvenis picture of the Paris Commune, presenting Fifty-One Portraits of the men whose names are most prominently connected with that great uprising of the people, & adorned with mottoes from Danton, Blanqui, Pyat, Proudhon, J.Wm Lloyd, Tridon, & August Spies. Of all the Commune souvenirs that have ever been issued this picture stands easily first. It is executed by the phototype process from a veryrare colleciton of photographs, measures 15 inches by 24, & is printed on heavy paper for framing. Over 50 portraits for 25 cents.

Wind-Harp Songs. By J.Wm. Lloyd. Poems of life, love, nature, liberty, & death. An appropriate gift book. icely bound. Price $1.00.

Lloyd, John William, 1857-1940. Manuscripts, 1888-1934. 6 items. Lloyd, The collection contains typed manuscripts of his unpublished writings, including Harold Brey, a Romance of Sincerity (1931); The Island of Delgar, an Iridescent Mystery [n.d.]; "A Brief Definition of the Larger Love" (1929); "Woman & the Larger Love" (1933); & "New Ideals in Love" (1926), a lecture delivered before the Workers' Forum of Los Angeles, California. Also included is Chatting with J. William Lloyd, a 1934 biography by Robert P. Beck that discusses Lloyd's medical work, writings, association with a spiritualist commune in Florida, & friends & acquaintances. It also contains photos & a bibliography of Lloyd's writings. http://www.lib.umich.edu/spec-coll/types.htm#irisheart,/a>
http://are.as.wvu.edu/scribners/commurel.htm
http://flag.blackened.net/daver/anarchism/tucker/wendy3.html

--


"I had a happy life. I was once a Yankee batboy."

Scott Nappi, 18, abducted along with a friend in a Nyack, NY carjacking in which both Nappi & the friend were shot. Nappi survived by playing dead, saying he was prepared for death.

USA Today

http://www.velocity.net/~bb10k/BB10khome.html


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-- anarchy & scifi http://www.infoshop.org/anarchysf.html



?
-- Mick Farren http://www.imusic.com/showcase/rock/mickfarren.html
http://www.zpub.com/notes/aan-art.html

?
-- Walter Crane (1845-1915); not in the bleed as of 2/04

http://www.zpub.com/notes/aan-art.html

-- alan moore http://www.alanmoorefansite.com/news/news_content.html
http://www.aint-it-cool-news.com/ http://www.salon.com/people/feature/2000/10/18/moore/index.html

?
-- REMF


?
-- EHRHART


--

The Genre of the Political Novel: A Select, Annotated, Polemical Bibliography

John Whalen-Bridge, Assistant Professor of English, National University of Singapore

[Send your additions, disagreements, & suggestions to george@landow.com. Please provide complete bibliographical information for each item.]


Blotner, Joseph. The Modern American Political Novel, 1900-1960. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1966.

It attempts to recuperate the non-relativist sense of the genre that has become difficult if not impossible when approaching postwar American texts: "In order to keep the study from extending to all outdoors, `political' is here defined in a very literal & functional sense. The subject of these works, apart from a few on the fringe noted as such but illustrating particular themes, is also primarily political" (8). By this standard the political novel has a disadvantage as art. Blotner's "functional" definition actually excludes a number of interesting novels -- such as Sinclair's The Jungle (1906) & proletarian novels such as Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath (1939 --that are about politics & that function politically. . . . Like many students of the political novel who attempt an exact & exclusive definition, Blotner asks, "Why are there so few modern American political novels of any excellence? Why are there so many bad ones?" This sense of almost unavoidable disappointment is the natural consequence of any attempt to describe the American political novel from an apolitical vantage point.

Foley, Barbara. Radical Representations: Politics & Form in U.S. Proletarian Fiction, 1929-1941. Durham: Duke University Press, 1993.

A polemical, revisionist attempt to rescue the proletarian novel from the charges that political commitment on the part of writers affiliated with the Communist Party yielded only programmatic rhetoric rather than "literature" as the New Critics understood it. In this inclusive, remarkably well researched & argued study, Foley fights the remnants of New Critical faith tooth, nail, & footnote. Furthermore, Foley argues that literature is inherently political without discussing the Wall Street Crash as a "text." Radical Representations is skeptical about the radical skepticism of much postmodern literary theory, though it employs contemporary modes of interpretation judiciously, such as when Foley engages the complexities of narratology to show that the roman à thesis novel should not be regarded as "inadmissible evidence" in the court of literature. Foley's study defends categories such as "proletarian novel," thereby throwing the gauntlet down before today's literary fashions, especially when she argues that the neglect of proletarian fiction in postwar criticism directly parallels the disregard of proletarian realities in contemporary America.

Howe, Irving. Politics & the Novel. Rev. ed. New York: New American Library, 1987.

[Howe] envisioned the political novel in a more purely literary way (as it were) than did Rideout. Howe waved away the problem of precise definition as something for rigid scholastics to quibble over, opting, instead, to define the political novel in this way: "By a political novel I mean a novel in which political ideas play a dominant role or in which a political milieu is the dominant setting. . . . Perhaps it would be better to say: a novel in which we take to be dominant political ideas or the political milieu" (17). . . . Still, he provided no particular insight about why the political novel should be harder to define than other genres. . . . Perhaps as a strategy for avoiding the bias that political literature is by nature inferior, Howe consistently aestheticized politics, thus transforming the object of his criticism slightly.

Milne, Gordon. The American Political Novel. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1966.

Milne attempts to redeem the political novel from the limitation implied by Speare's emphasis on ideas alone. The political novel, according to Milne, is an emotion-laden form. . . . Perhaps to exonerate the genre from charges of inherent dullness, later critics such as Milne question the difference between the political novel & the non-political novel. This is done through an approach that is in some ways similar to Howe's: the political novel is aestheticized completely. The political novel can be emotional & exciting without seducing readers into actual political activity if we regard it as a kind of opera rather than as a form of activism. Milne's political novel is purely a spectator sport.

Reed, T. V. Fifteen Jugglers, Five Believers: Literary Politics & the Poetics of American Social Movements. Berekley: University of California Press, 1992.

Reed integrates "high theory" (which I take to mean post-structuralist, feminist, new historicist, & neo-Marxist writing that is very, very abstract) with close readings of a selection of socially engaged texts to "assist the project of convincing literary critics that their work is unavoidably political & needs to become more attuned to radically democratic social movements" (xi). . . . Reed's is unlike the kinds of studies that "say" politics while merely doing literature: he claims he cannot distinguish between the two--and then proceeds to illuminate political novels (and other "texts") in very interesting ways. While I am never convinced that a march on the Pentagon or other sort of public theater should be confused with the text of an actual writer, his approach is fruitful & interesting.

Rideout, Walter. The Radical Novel in the United States, 1900-1954. Cambride: Harvard University Press, 1956.

Rideout discerned that there were differences between the literary & political uses of language, but he refused to cooperate with any sort of categorical apartheid. The Cold War climate did not prevent Rideout from completing & publishing his study, but he had to work against the anti-political prejudice constantly to fashion his book: the radical element in fiction is "extrinsic" to the pure matter of literature & perhaps ought to be "contained" elsewhere. Since "strict" literary history would effectually gerrymander the political novel out of existence, the study of political fiction itself became a kind of impurity.

Schaub, Thomas. American Fiction in the Cold War. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1991.

A good example of the way in which a focus on the politics of criticism displaces the reading of political literature. Schaub presents his donné with admirable clarity: "This book is about the discourse of revisionist liberalism--what was then called `the new liberalism'--as it appears within the discussion & practice of fiction in the United States during the forties & fifties." In its unmasking of this liberalism, the book leaves us with a Foucauldian sense that the Revisionist Liberal discourse was somehow inescapable. Each chapter develops the political consequences of innovations supposedly following the `end of ideology,' but Schaub's critique of the post-war "anti-ideology" does not really operate from outside of that ideology. We can see this in a general way in the preferential treatment he gives to supposedly apolitical or anti-liberal writers such as John Barth & Flannery O'Connor, & his way of reading becomes especially cramped when he discusses an unrepentantly political novelist such as Norman Mailer.

Speare, Morris Edmund. The Political Novel: Its Development in England & in America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1924.

The academic study of the political novel begins . . .with [this] founding study. He wrote about both English & American political novels but was concerned to show the differences between these traditions as well as their similarities. . . . Speare never apologizes for exploring the political novel, a form that soon becomes inherently questionable. . . .Speare's recognition of the partisan nature of political fiction is presented in a disarmingly direct fashion. Contemporary readers who are so quick to find in Speare quaint signs of class privilege overlook the ways in which this reader from 1924 is ahead of today's culture contests, wherein it must be continually reasserted that political struggle is an appropriate end of art. . . .Speare's study is . . . the last one published in the United States to speak of the political novel without apology.

Siebers, Tobin. Politics of Skepticism. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.

The best book on the interrelations between politics & literary criticism as they interrelate in the Cold War era. . . . Siebers is refreshingly direct about the interrelations between politics & literature: "Politics demands that we risk taking a position, that we stand somewhere, that we decide, & that we accept as part of the political process the possibility that our positions, stances, & positions may go horribly wrong, nowhere, or miraculously right. This is the only form of arbitrariness, a favorite term of skeptical criticism, worth talking about & with which it is important to live. The possibility of arbitrariness & risk in the political process is the only good rationale for binding ourselves to skepticism (viii)." In discussing such critics & theorists as W. K. Wimsatt, Monroe Beardsley, Stephen Greenblatt, Paul de Man, Jane Tompkins, & Barbara Herrnstein Smith, Siebers demonstrates the intricate & manifold ways in which Cold War criticism (some of which refers to political struggle & claims to struggle politically) flees from genuine political risk. Politics depends on a sort of belief that has been ruled inadmissible by New Critics & post-structuralists of various stripe, critics who have all avoided the defining risks of political activity. . . . He also claims that "literary criticism needs to take account of what politics really is," that it must not resort to "reinventing politics as a trope of negative freedom," & that literary criticism involves life-affirming principles and, therefore, must respect our inner lives. This last recommendation is, for Siebers, very much part of making a home in the world: "Literary critics who abandon their fondness for storytelling, beauty, aesthetic pleasure, language, & human talk about them willfully estrange themselves from a large part of the world in which they live" (156-57).

Trivedi, Haris. "Defining the Political Novel" in The American Political Novel: Critical Essays. New Delhi: Allied, 1984. 3-15.

Both thorough & witty.

Whalen-Bridge, John. Political Fiction & the American Self. Urbana & Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1998.

[Would anyone like to provide a capsule review? GPL.]

Wilding, Michael. Political Fictions. Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1980.

Wilding's own study is valuable for its willingness to question overly-certain boundaries between political & supposedly non-political fiction (he discusses Huck Finn alongside conventionally recognized political novels such as The Iron Heel & Nineteen Eighty-Four), but the need to present himself as a literary-liberator has distorted his reading of previous critics.

http://einsys.einpgh.org:8881/MARION?S=POLITICAL+POETRY


--


O'Neil, George, Anarchist Mountain, Farmer, YE
Osgood, Charles, Anarchist Mountain, Farmer, YE
B.C. VOTERS LIST 1898 - O from the Sessional Papers of the British Columbia Government, 1899
Yale, East Riding YE 1,229
http://www.rootsweb.com/~canbc/vote1898/voteo.htm




--


From: "Research on Anarchism" Reply-To: To: "RA-L post"

From: Jamie

Anarchist Mountain is the tallest peak in the Osoyoos/Rock Creek area of southern British Columbia, also known as Anarchist Summit (there is even a rest area on the highway called "Anarchist Summit rest area").

I always thought it would be a great place for an anarchist gathering. According to the book, 1001 Place Names in British Columbia, it is named after an Irish man who lived in the area & at one time was the local Justice of the Peace!

Apparently, he wasn't good at following orders.




--


Anarchist Mountain Writing Contest

A one page story, essay, poem, &/or drawing, or whatever, explaining how the mountain came to be an anarchist. Drawings must depict what an anarchist mountain looks like & must include one black flag. Written submissions must include the following words/phrases (in any disorder):

wine, hermit, telescope, landing zone, renegade, justice, bed & breakfast, Osoyoos, Long Joe

Adult entry (18 years or older) get the satisfaction of their craft.

Winning entry from anyone 17 years old or younger receives a $25 gift certificate for used books from Recollection Books


?
http://www.mapquest.com/cgi-bin/mqtrip?link=btwn/twn-ddir_results_page&east=1&uid=u6gbo2z5adhby0kb:2x1ft0hr7l&SNVData=fy%28w1lla1_%29ua2du1n%24tw2%28%3a%28FJ%17MVND%28%14%12%3a1g96b_F%15%2850yt25%3a_n10b5lf%28l9u%402%3d6%282%24twn%28%3a%28Iebkix5%28OR%3a%28Y%12%3arwuabx%3d%3d2nhwz0g%3ar01-7_u%3a7%3bteqej%3bjixedr%24nx-9.3mad3-d.cv%28u,rb%3b7&CITY_0=SEATTLE&STATE_0=WA&CITY_1=osoyoos&STATE_1=bc&ZIP_0=98103&CC_0=US&CC_1=CA&OPC=null&DPC=null&POIRad=2.0



-- Moses Harmon 1830-1910.Edited Lucifer the Light Bearer 1886-1907,then became the American Journal of Eugenics(ed 1907-1910).Arrested many times for obscenity under the Comstock Law of 1873.Author of many pamphlets. Bit more for your bio,if you want it Best wishes


-- back credits

julia warner, singer, songwriter, born in vienna (aut), grew up in new jersey (usa), vps-student (nick cave, anne waldman, ruth weiss, steven taylor) camilo antonio, poet, performer, born in isabella (the philippines), vps-student (jackson mac low, h.c. artmann, allen ginsberg, jerome rothenberg, anne waldman, ruth weiss) renee gadsden, writer, historian, radio-moderator, born in new york (usa), vps-teacher & -student (allen ginsberg, jackson mac low) ide, born in vienna (aut), poet, performer, vps-co-founder, -director, -teacher & -student sample-voice franz fuchs, racist terrorist, born in gralla (aut), killed 4 members of the roma-community, injured 17 people by sending out 28 letter bombs, committed suicide while in prison, february 2000 lyrics & voice score austria, austria, austria, austria austria accepts her responsibility arising out of the tragic history & the horrendous crimes of the national socialist regime the singularity of the crimes of the holocaust are an exhortation to permanent alertness against all forms of dictatorship & totalitarianism. austria, austria, austria, austria airtsua, airtsua, österreich we condemn & actively combat any form of discrimination, xenophobia, anti-semitism, racism & demagoguery austria stands for respect artistic freedom & understanding for all human beings, irrespective of their origin, religion or weltanschauung. austria, austria, austria, austria es lebe die deutsche volksgruppe, es lebe österreich es lebe die deutsche volksgruppe, es lebe österreich we will ensure unreserved clarification exposure of the structures of injustice & the transmission of this knowledge to coming generations as a warning for the future. austria, austria, austria, austria airtsua, airtsua austria, austria, österreich, austria, austria, österreich austria, austria, österreich, austria, austria, österreich ... standard: voices: students of the vienna poetry school (vps) italics: sample-voice: austrian racist terrorist underline: voices: people representing different cultures ______________________________________________ "airtsua" (pronounced "airtso") is the audio-reverse version of "austria" corresponding with the politically-reversed version of the same. ______________________________________________ words ide, quoting & paraphrasing the "declaration", published 2000 02 04, on the occasion of the inauguration of the new austrian government, signed by wolfgang schüssel, chancellor & head of the people's party & jörg haider, governor of carinthia & then head of the freedom party http://www.sfd.at/politics/


-- CHARLES BERNSTEIN

"Verse is born free but everywhere in chains. It has been my project to rattle the chains." http://epc.buffalo.edu/authors/bernstein/TLS.htm


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--



--


CONTINUAR LA OBRA DE CAPPELLETTY

SAlud y @

Compañeros el Colectivo libertario ALAS DE XUE ha querido continuar la obra del compañero Cappelletty, para tal fin nos hemos dado a al tarea de ampliar y correguir el gronograma del Anarquismo en Latinoamerica que realizo en compañia del Pr. Rama y que fue editado y distribuido en Venezuela. Basicamente lo que hemos incluido son los momentos de presencia Anarquista y Anarcosindicalista en Colombia y algunos datos de Peru y Bolivia. Les recordamos que para aquellos compañer@s que esten interesados en conocer mas a fondo el Anarquismo en Colombia, la Fundacion de Estudios LIbertarios Anselmo Lorenzo ha puesto a la venta el libro de Biofilo Panclasta; El eterno prisionero, editado por el Colectivo Libertario Alas de Xue.

La idea es que tod@s l@s compañer@s de todos los paises aporten datos a este cronograma, la historia es una construccion social. La presentacion del cronograma sera realizada durante las JORNADAS LIBERTARIAS MAYO DEL 98 em Colombia.

SALUD Y A TEJER LA HISTORIA!!!! ALAS DE XUE

From: luis fajardo , 1998
To:anarqlat@majordomo.ucv.edu.ve Cc:a-infos-d@tao.ca

El anarquismo en América Latina
A continuacion la version html del cronograma aumentado y corregido por el colectivo libertario Alas de Xue.

CONTINUAR LA OBRA DE CAPPELLETTY I
 
 

1847. Constitución de las "Sociedades democráticas" en Colombia, con influencia
de las ideas de Proudhon, matizadas por pensadores liberales. La frase que se
escuchaba al iniciar las reuniones era: "La propiedad es un robo. Estas
Sociedades funcionan hasta 1854.

1861   Plotinio C. Rhodakanaty llega a méxico y publica su Cartilla Socialista,
Bakunin pasa dos semanas en Panamá.

Páez, presidente de Vanazuela; Juárez, de México; García Moreno, de Ecuador,
Buenos Aires vence a la Confederación Argentina en Pavón. España vuelve a
ocupar la República Dominicana. F. Varela: Nocturnas, Bernabé Demaría: La
América Libre.

1862   Rhodakanaty inicia su tarea de organizador entre trabajadores y estudiantes de la ciudad de México.

Mitre, oresidente de Argentina; San Ronán de Perú; F. Solano López de
Paraguay. Blest Gana: Martín Rivas; Antonio Díaz:  Los treinta y tres orientales
libertadores.

1863   Rhodakanaty funda en la ciudad de México el <<Grupo de Estudiantes
Socialistas>>.

Maximiliano, emperador de México. Triunfo de los federales en Venezuela:
Convenio de Coche y presidencia de Falcón. Nuevamente se indeoendiza la
República Dominicana. La flota española frente a El Callao. José Hernandez: Vida
del Chacho; Arona: Ruinas.

1864   Rodhakanaty publica su Neopanteismo y prosigue su labor de organización
y propaganda.

Melgarejo, presidente de Bolivia. Los españoles toman las islas Chincha al Perú.
En Lima se reune un Congreso de Estados Americanos. Constitución Federal en
Venezuela. Los republicanos luchan en México contra Maximiliano de Austria y
las tropas francesas de ocupación. Tropas brasileñas sitian la ciudad uruguaya de
Paysandú. Machado de Assis: Crisálidas. Se adopta el nombre de Estados Unidos
de Venezuela.

1865   Surge en México <<La Social>>. Una Sección de la Internacional funciona
en Martinica. Rodhakanaty funda en Chalco la <<Escuela del Rayo y del
Socialismo>>, de dónde salen Zlacosta y Chávez.

Guerra de la Triple Alianza (Brasil, Uruguay y Argentina) contra Paraguay. Perú
firma un tratado con España. J. Carrión, presidente de Ecuador; José María
Cabral, de República Dominicana. Juana Manuela Gorriti: Sueños y Realidades.

1866   En la isla de Guadalupe funciona una sección de la Internacional.
Saturnino Martínez funda en La Habana el periódico La Aurora, con alguna
influencia proudhoniana.

Guerra hispano-peruana. Solano López es vencido en Tuyutí. Estanislao del
Campo: Fausto; Francisco X. de Acha: La unión se va a las nubes.

1867   Rodhakanaty deja Chalco y regresa a la ciudad de México.

Maximiliano ajusticiado en Querétaro. Juárez entra en la caopital de México.
Santos Acosta, presidente de Colombia; Prado, de Perú. En Haití, Sanalve
derroca a Geffrad. Jorge Isaacs: María; José H. Uriarte: El ángel de los pobres.

1868   Los anarquistas promueven una huelga en las fábricas textiles de Tlalpan.

Juárez otra vez presidente de México; Guzmán, de Nicaragua; sarmiento, de
Argentina; Balta, de Perú. Revolución Azul en Venezuela. Se inicia en Cuba la
guerra de diez añoscontra toda España. Asunción cae en poder de las tropas de
la Triple Alianza. En Puerto Rico, grito de Lares y gobierno de F. Ramírez. Pedro
Echagüe: Amor y virtud; Juan María Gutierrez: Noticias históricas sobre el origen y
desarrollo de la enseñanza pública y superior en Buenos Aires..

1869   Los anrquista mexicanos fundan el <<Circulo Proletario>>. Julio Chávez
publica su Manifiesto a todos los oprimidos y pobresde México y del Universo, y
cuatro meses después es fusilado.

García Moreno, dictador de Ecuador. Juárez enfrenta una insurrección. I.M.
Altamirano: Clemencia. Se inicia la publicación de La prensa en Buenos Aires.

1870   Los anarquistas crean en México el <<Gran Circulo de Obreros>>.

Muere Solano López y concluye la guerra de la Triple Alianza. Nissage Saget
presidente de Haití; Guzmán Blanco, de Venezuela. Instrucción gratuita y
obligatoria en ese país. Fin de la dictadura de Melgarejo en Bolivia. En Brasil
surge el partido Republicano. Lucio V. Mansilla: Una excursión a los indios
ranqueles. Se publica en Buenos Aires el diario La Nación, en Río de Janeiro, La
República.

1871   Los anarquistas de <<La Social>> fundan en México el periódico El
Socialista. Llegan a Buenos Aires algunos exiliados que habían actuado en la
Comuna de París y entre ellos el anarquista Gobley. La banderarojinegra pasa a
ser símbolo del movimiento obrero mexicano.

Se fund en Montevideo la Asociación Rural. Se suprime en Chile el fuero
eclesiástico. Pesta amarilla en Buenos Aires. Libertad de vientre en Brasil.
errázuriz Zañartu, presidente de Chile; Cuadra, de Nicaragua; Juárez, otra vez, de
México. Aparce la Revista del Río de Plata, de Andrés Lamas, Vicente Fidel
López y Juan María Gutiérrez. Este último publica Juan Cruz Varela.

1872   Se funda la sección Uruguaya de la Asociación Intrnacional de
Trabajadores, donde predominan los anarquistas. También la Sección Argentina,
en la cual el grupo francés es marxista; el italiano y el español , anarquistas.

Pardo, presidente de Perú; Lerdo de Tejada, de México. Se unen Honduras, El
Salvador, Guatemala y Costa Rica para constituir la Unión Centroamericana. José
Hernández: Martín Fierro; Hilario Ascásubi: Santos Vega; Ricardo Palma:
Tradiciones peruanas; José María Estrada: La política liberal bajo la tiranía de
Rosas.

1873   El obrero español Francisco Tomás informa que la <<Federación Regional
española>> no tiene noticias de las Secciones de Cuba. El botánico
proudhoniano. José Ernesto Gebert publica su Ennumeratio plantarum sponte
nascentium agro montevidensi.

Dictadura jacobina d Barrios en Guatemala. Abolición dela esclavitud en Puerto
Rico. José Martí publica en México la Revista Universal y su libro La República
española ante la Revolución cubana.

1874   Aparecen México los periódicos anarquistas El Obrero Internacional y La
Comuna.

Nicolás Avellaneda, presidente de Argentina; Domingue de Haití. Nueva
Contitución en Venezuela. En México se edita  El craneoscopio- Periódico
frenológico y científico. J.P. Varela: La educación del pueblo.

1875   La Sección Uruguaya de la AIT organiza su primer mítin y un grupo de
afiliados emcabezados por Francisco Galcerán publica su primer manifiesto
anarquista.

Estrada Palma, presidente de Ciba, Pedro J. Chamorro, de Guatemala. Piérola
fracas en su intento de deponer a Pardo. Tobías Barreto: Estudios de filosofía e
crítica, Antonio Díaz: El frac y el chiripá.

1876   Se constituye la <<Federación Regional de la República Oriental del
Uruguay>> (más tarde Federación Obrera Regional Uruguaya). Se reúne en
México un Congreso General Obrero en el que participan muchos anarquista. Los
Bakuninistas predominan en la sección argentina de la AIT. En México comienzan
a editarse El Hijo del Trabajo y La Internacional.

Guerra civil tripartita en México. Porfirio Díaz toma el poder. Latorre, dictador de
Uruguay; daza, de Bolivia; Pinto, presidnte de Chile; Boisrond-Canal, de Haití. B.
Mitre: Historia de Belgrano; J.C. Bustamante: El veterano oriental; Montalvo: El
Regenerador; J.P. Varela: De la Legislación escolar.

1877 Zalacosta inicia una revolución campesina bajo el signo libertario.
Nuevamente los anarquistas promueven huelgas an las fábricas textiles de
Tlalpan. aparece en México la traducción de Idea general de la revolución en el
siglo XIX de Proudhon, hecha por Rhodakanaty.

Linares Alcántara, presidente de Venezuela. Ley de educación laica y gratuita en
Uruguay. Se funda el Colegio Nacional del Paraguay. Olegario Andrade: Nido de
Cóndores; Martín Coronado: La rosa blanca; O. Moratori: Una mujer con
pantalones; R. Barbosa: El Papa y el concilio.

1878   La Sección Uruguaya de la AIT publica el periódico El Interncional.
Zalacosta presenta un plan para expropiar los latifundios y suprimir el gobierno
central. Se publica La Ley del Pueblo de Alberto Santa Fe. En Puebla sale La
Revolución Social.

Fin de la guerra de los diez años en Cuba. J. Trujillo gobirna en Colombia;
Veintemilla en Ecuador; Barreiro en Paraguay. Eduardo Wilde: Tiempo Perdido;
Ricardo Gutiérrez: Poesia; J.B. Alberdi: Peregrinación de Luz del Día; E. Godon:
El lujo de la miseria; Galván: Enriquillo.

1879   El coronel Alberto Santa Fe es encarcelado al fracasar el levantamiento del
Valle de San Martín. Aparece en Buenos Aires El Descamisado, primer periódico
anarquista argentino.

Octubre 26 de 1879
Vicente R. Lizcano, conocido en los circulos anarquistas como "Biofilo Panclasta"
nace en Chinácota (N. De Santander -Colombia)
Padres: Bernardo Rojas y Simona Lizcano.

Se inicia en Venezuela el <<quinquenio>> de Guzmán Blanco. Roca emprende la
campaña del Desiero. <<Guerra chiquita>> en cuba; guerra grande en el Pacífico:
Chile lucha contra Bolivia y Perú. Piérola, presidente del Perú; Zabala, de
Nicaragua; Salomón, en Haití.Eduardo Gutiérrez: Juan Moreira; Ferreira y Artigas:
Donde las den las toman; José Hernández: La vuelta de Martín Fierro; Zorrilla de
san Martín: La leyenda patria; J.L. Mera: Cumandá.

1880   Llega a Buenos Aires el periodista libertario italiano Héctor Mattei.
Rhodanakaty publica Garantismo Social. Empieza a publicarse en Cuba El
Obrero, periódico de tendencia anarquista.

Roca, presidente de Argentina; Barrios, de Guatemala; Caballero, de Paraguay;
Núñez, de Colombia. Ley de Instrucción pública en este último país. <<Guerra del
vinten>> en Río de Janeiro. Buenos Aires es declarada capital federal de la
República Argentina. Florentino Ameghino: La Antigüedad del hombre en el Plata;
Varona: Conferencias filosófica; Montalvo: Las Catilinarias.

1881   Zalacosta es derrotado en Querétaro por tropas federales.

Constitución <<helvética>> en Venezuela. El ejército chileno ocupa Lima y el
presidente Calderón, hecho prisionero, es mandado a Chile.D. Santa María,
presiente de Chile. A. Azevedo: O Mulato; Machado de Assis: Memorias
póstumas de Brás Cubas; W. Bermúdez: Una Broma de César; Vázquez y Vega:
Críticas de la moral evolucionista; Cambaceres: Potpourri.

1882   En Montevideo empieza a editarse el semanario La Revolución Social.

Máximo Santos, presidente de Uruguay; Heureaux, de Santo Domingo; Fernández
Oreamuno, de Costa Rica. Fundación de La Plata, capital de la provincia de
Buenos Aires. Montalvo: Siete tratados; Martí: Ismaelillo; Medina: Los aborígenes
de Chile; Paul groussac: Ensayo histórico sobre Tucumán.

1883   Un grupo anarquista celebra en Montevideo, el 18 de marzo, el aniversario
dela Comuna de París.

Otalora, presidente de Colombia. Se aprueba la ley de matrimonio civil en
Uruguay. Chile se anexa Tacna, Arica y Tarapacá por el tratado de Ancón.
Capistrano de Abreu: El descubrimiento de Brasil y su desarrollo en el siglo XVI;
D.F. Sarmiento: Conflicto y armonía de las razas en América; R. Siva: Artículos de
costumbres; Gutiérrez Nájera: Cuentos frágiles; J. Calcaño: Cuentos fantásticos;
Varona : Estudios literarios y filosóficos.

Aparecen en Chile los Panfletos titulados "Anarquismo y rojismo en Nueva
Granada" de autor anónimo

1884   Aparece La Lucha Obrera, órgano de la federación Internacional de
Trabajadores del Uruguay. Un grupo intaliano funda en Buenos Aires el <<
Circulo comunista anrquista>>.

Joaquín Crespo,presidente de Venezuela; Porfirio Díaz, de nuevo, presidente de
México; R. Núñez, de nuevo, en Colombia. Chile se anexa Atacama y su costa
maritima. C.M. Ramírez: Artigas; Gavidia: Versos; Barros Arana: Historia gneral de
Chile; O. Bilac: Poesías; Lucio. V. López: La gran aldea; Antonio Argerich: Los
dos primores; Miguel Cané: Juvenilia; A. de Oliveira: Meridionales.

1885 En Montevideo sale el semanario anarco-colectivista La Federación de
Trabajadores. Llega a buenos Aires Enriqu Malatesta, quién comienza a publicar
La Cuestión Social (en castellano e italiano). En La Habana se funda el Circulo de
Trabajadores.

La infantería de marina yanqui oupa la ciudad de Colón (Panamá). Uruguay
devuelve a Paraguay trofeos de guerra. Iglesias presenta su renuncia en Perú.
Guerra en américa Central: El Salvador, Nicaragua y Costa Rica contra
Guatemala. Crisis fiscal en Venezuela: reducción de gastos presupuestarios. R.
Darío: Epístolas y poemas; J. Martí: Amistad funesta; Eugenio Cambaceres: Sin
rumbo; Diógenes Decoud: La Atlantida; Miguel Cané: Charlas literarias;  Calixto
Oyuela: Teoría literaria;  Rafael Obligado: Poesías; Arona: Sonetos y chispazos;
Lastarria: Antaño y hogaño; W.H. Hudson: La tierra purpúrea.

Viaje de Elíseo Reclus a la Nueva Granada, fruto de esta visita, Reclus publica su
obra "Colombia" estudio exhaustivo de la geografía de dicho país, Posteriormente
esta obra fue traducida del francés por F. J. Vergara y Velasco. Reclus Propuso al
gobierno Colombiano un "Proyecto de explotación agrícola" en la Sierra Nevada
de Santa Marta, lugar que califica de "República Idílica"
1886   Malatesta busca oro en la Patagonia para financiarla revolución social.

Biófilo Panclasta, Anarquista Colombiano, comienza sus estudios primarios.
Su rebeldía se hacia manifiesta en su sentido anticlerical.
Guzmán Blanco otra vez presidente de Venezuela: la Aclamación.Patricio
Escobar, presidente de Paraguay; Balmaceda, de Chile; Juárez Celman, de
argentina; Cáceres, de Perú. Núñez, de nuevo presidente de Colombia, proclama
la Constitución unitaria. Díaz Mirón: Poesías escogidas; Montalvo: El espectador;
Podestá estrena, en Buenos Aires, Juan Moreira. En Montevideo nace el diario El
Día.

1887  Roig San Martín inicia en La Habana la publicación de El Productor. Allí
mismo se reúne el primer Congreso Obrero Local. Mattei edita en Buenos Aires El
Socialista,semanario anarco-comunista y Malatesta organiza la <<Sociedad
Cosmopolita de Obreros Panaderos>>.

Fundación del Partido Colorado en Paraguay y del Partido Demócrata en Chile.
Educación gratuita y obligatoria en México. E. rabasa: La bola; R. Darío: Abrojos;
I. de María: Montevideo antiguo; B. Mitre: Historia de San Martín; R. Palma:
Poesía.

1888 En Buenos aires funciona el <<Círculo Socialista Internacional>>, formado
por anarquistas italianos y españoles.

J.P. Rojas Paúl, presidente de Venezuela. Abolición de la esclavitud en Brasil.
Sacasa, presidente de Nicaragua; Legitime, de Haití. Rubén Darío: Azul; Zorrilla
de San Martín: tabaré; Hostos: Moral social; Silvio Romero: História da literatura
brasileira; Acevedo Díaz: Ismael; belmiro de Almeida: Arrufos; Sanín Cano:
Colombia hace sesenta años; Altamirano: El Zarco; Leopoldo Díaz: Sonetos.

1889 Malatesta regresa a Europa.

Pedro II es destronado en Brasil. Se funda la Universidad de Asunción. Se unen
Honduras, El salvador y Guatemala. Hyppolite, presidente de Haití. Ricardo
Jaimes Freyre: Castalia bárbara; Vicente F. López: História de la República
Argentina; Manuel T. Podestá: Irresponsable; C. Matto de Turner: Aves sin nido;
Picón Febres: El sargento Felipe; Justo Sierra: México social y político; J.S.
decoud: Sobre la literatura en el Paraguay; Martí: La edad de oro; J. Verissimo:
Estudios brasileiros.

1890 Giovanni Rossi funda en la província de Paraná (Brasil) la colonia
anarquista Cecilia. En Buenos Aires comienza a editarse El Perseguido, órgano
comunista anárquico. P. Amilcare redacta en Montevideo La Voz del Trabajador.
En Iquique (Chile) se produce una huelga de lancheros, promovida por los
anarquistas, que concluye en una gran matanza.

Biófilo Panclasta es considerado el mejor estudiante de Historia de un colegio de
Pamplona. Al respecto afirma: "Era como una intuición del eterno éxodo de mi
vida".

Andueza Palacios, presidente de Venezuela; Juan G. González, de Paraguay. Se
fundan las universidades del Zulia y carabobo en Venezuela. Morales Bermúdez,
presidente de Perú; Herrera y Obes,de Uruguay; C. Pellegrini, de Argentina.
Surge en este país la Unión Cívica radical. M.V. Romerogarcía: Peonía; A.
Azevedo: O Cortic,o; L. López Méndez: Mosaico de política y literatura; azevedo
Díaz: Nativa; J. Calcaño: El héroe de Turbaco; Carlos Roxlo: En la sombra; Lucio
V. Mansilla: Entre nos.

1891 En La Habana se publica como örgano libertario El Trabajo.

Suicidio de Balmaceda y presidencia de Mont en Chile. Constitución republicana
en Brasil. Revolución liberal en Paraguay.
J. Muñoz Tébar: El personalismo y el legalismo; M. García Merou: Recuerdos
literarios; Ocantos: Quilito; Julián Martell: La bolsa; Mchado de Assis: Quincas
Borba; J. Martí: Versos sencillos; A. Rojas: Orígenes venezolanos. Se edita El
Cojo Ilustrado en Caracas.

1892 Se celebra en Río de Janeiro el Primer congreso obrero del Brasil, con
predominio de delegados anarquistas. En Paraguay, el grupo <<Los hijos del
Chaco>> publica un manifiesto libertario. En Sao Paulo, comienza a publicarse Gli
Schiavi Bianchi.

Revolución federalista en Río Grande do Sul. revolución legalista en Venezuela:
Joaquín Crespo, presidente. Revolución liberal en Honduras: Bonilla presidente.
J. Gil Fortoul: ¿Idilio?; E. Blanco: José Félix Ribas; Adolfo Saldías: Historía de la
Confederación Argentina; Del Casal: Nieve. Martí funda el periódico Patria.

1893 Giovanni Rossi publica su libro Cecilía, comunitá anarchica sperimentale.
Llega a Cuba el tipógrafo catalán Pedro Esteve, gran propagandista del
anarquismo. Los anarquistas cubanos fundan la Sociedad General de
Trabajadores. En Buenos Aires se publican los periódicos anarquistas La Liberté
(en francés) y La Riocossa (en italiano); en santiago de Chile, El Oprimido; en
Montevideo, El Derecho a la Vida; en Sao Paulo, L’Asino Umano (en italiano). Se
fund en Cuba el Partido Reformista. Bombardeo de Rio de Janeiro por el
almirante Melo, aliado de los federalistas de Rio Grande do Sul. Zelaya depone a
Sacasa y es proclamado presidente de Nicaragua. Limantour, ministro de
Hacienda de México. Nueva constitución en Venezuela. La Nueva Australia en Paraguay.
R.J. Cuervo: Diccionario de construcción y régimen de la lengua castellana;
Joaquín V. González: Mis montañas; L. Level de Goda: Historía contemporánea
de Venezuela política y militar; Del Casal: Bustos y rimas; J.L. Flores: Horas; Elías
Regules: Las vivezas de Juancito; J. Da Cruz e Sousa: Broqueles; G. Picón
Febres: Fidelia; A. Audibert: Los límites de la antigua provincia de Paraguay.

15 y 16 ENERO / JANUARY 15 de 1893. Levantamiento artesanal en Bogotá. La ciudad fue
durante dos días un foco de emancipación, el poder y la autoridad fueron
duramente cuestionados y la ciudad prácticamente estuvo en manos del Pueblo.
El informe del gobierno Francés se refería a esta rebelión como " Un movimiento
Anarquista" que predicaba "La propaganda por la acción". Los insurgentes
ondeaban banderas "Rojinegras" símbolo de los anarquistas Europeos y gritaban
consignas avivando "La Comuna" Y al anarquista "Rabachol" y mueras al
gobierno, la policía y la iglesia.
 
 
http://recollectionbooks.com/anow/world/la/argentina/

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-- 1954- Phenix City, alabama Date: Fri, 29 Nov 2002 01:27:00 EST From: SFAH1970@aol.com To: Bleed The man that was shot had just won the State Attorney General race, & his name was Albert L. Patterson. The man accused of the shooting was Albert Fuller. Fuller was the chief deputy not the Sheriff. To update this new evidence has been brought forward to the District attorney showing that the witnesses to this murder at the trial in 1955 in Birmingham, Al had been bought by John Patterson the murder man's son who by the way was elected Attorney General in 1954 & was a resident of the state of Georgia. This was illegal by the Constitution of Alabama 1901, which reads that a man qualifying to run for Att. or Gov. must be a resident for not less than five years.


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-- http://www.anarchy.orcon.net.nz/index.html CONTACT TO ADD LINKS ?


-- to do:

FINISH UP Manifeste des Seize ; CHECK & CLEAN UP LINKS & REUPLOAD

COMBINE & PUT ONLINE THE LUDDITE CRONOLOGY

FINISH UP THE BAKUNIN PAGE STUFF i DID NOT FINISH clear out

  • continue working on the SINNERS, on ESKIMO converting/redirects to server folder on SERVER, clearing out entries that are already in the ENCYCLOPEDIA

  • vietnam buttons that are being resized & background changed to black, are being uploaded to server button foloder; mostly being converted from gifs to jpgs; need to replace in BB, some in 60s, & the gifs in BB will need to be removed



    -- images RED STAR UNDER CONSTRUCTION ?


    -- El anarquismo en Chile Si bien el anarquismo hoy en día se aparece como un fenómeno político joven, y quizás por lo mismo, de alguna novedad para el movimiento revolucionario post-dictadura, nuestra presencia se remonta a los inicios mismos de las luchas sociales en este país. La historia del anarquismo es indisociable del planteamiento de la cuestión social en Chile y de la formación de las primeras asociaciones obreras, como fueron las sociedades en resistencia y las mancomúnales. Así mismo la historia del anarquismo en nuestro país no puede disociarse del escenario en el cual se desarrolló, es decir el Chile de la segunda mitad del siglo XIX: un escenario de profundas injusticias sociales, de un capitalismo en expansión alimentado principalmente por Capitales británicos aliados a la burguesía nacional, que propiciaba un desarrollo capitalista dependiente, con énfasis primordial en actividades mineras, como el salitre, la plata y el carbón, así como también en el cobre y en el área portuaria, la banca y el comercio. Los intereses de esta burguesía había llevado a la ocurrencia de dos hechos de profundo significado histórico y de gran dolor para nuestro pueblo: por un lado, a la brutal Guerra del Pacífico, y por otro, a la no menos brutal "pacificación" de la Araucanía, guerras en las cuales se mandó a morir al roto, sugestión patriotera mediante, para beneficiar los bolsillos patronales. Estas guerras de expansión capitalistas, dieron un impulso a la explotación salitrera en el norte, con la incorporación de tierras bolivianas y peruanas, así como dieron nuevos bríos a la agricultura con la incorporación de toda la zona de la Araucanía a la República. Como vemos, el carácter dependiente de nuestro desarrollo hacía que coexistieran áreas de un importante desarrollo urbano e industrial (recordemos que la primera central hidroeléctrica del país, Chivilingo, nace al calor de la explotación del carbón en Lota), a la par que otras zonas del país, que no presentaban interés para la burguesía inglesa y sus aliados chilenos, quedaran relegadas a la marginalidad y al atraso económico y de infraestructura, situación que será característica de nuestras repúblicas "bananeras" latinoamericanas. A la par que se da este proceso de expansión y acumulación de Capitales, se da el proceso de proletarización de la población, la cual se ve sometida a su condición fundamental de asalariada. Por un lado, se da el proceso de proletarización en los centros urbanos e industriales, en los cuales se aprecia el tránsito de los artesanos empobrecidos y desplazados a proletarios, vale decir, a trabajadores asalariados y apatronados. Por otro, en el campo, muchos campesinos comienzan a perder sus tierras por la creciente concentración de los latifundistas, lo que lleva al peonaje y al huaso a un constante proceso de "proletarización" campesino, así como a una sistemática emigración a la ciudad y a los centros productivos (minas, puertos, obras, etc....), donde engruesan las filas de el proletariado criollo. En el campo, proceso semejante se vive por los mapuche, arrinconados en sus reducciones y corridos por los colonos europeos; muchos de ellos terminan por ir a las ciudades donde terminarán muchos incorporados a la actividad panadera. En este marco nuevo que adopta la lucha de clases, las antiguas organizaciones surgidas principalmente bajo el influjo de artesanos, que eran las mutuales o sociedades de socorros mutuos comienzan a quedar obsoletas. Estas organizaciones tenían por eje central la actividad asistencialista. Las nuevas organizaciones que necesitaba la clase obrera, sin dejar de lado ciertas prácticas asistencialistas (ayuda, educación) y de apoyo mutuo, sanas y necesarias entre los oprimidos, cambiaban su eje principal del asistencialismo a la lucha y el enfrentamiento a la clase patronal, que les condenaba a condiciones de vida infrahumanas. Nacía así la conciencia del proletariado en este país; se hacía consciente de que sus intereses de bienestar y libertad se oponían a los intereses de quienes los explotaban para enriquecerse. Estas organizaciones nuevas, que representarán los intereses de esta clase obrera, serán las sociedades en resistencia y las mancomunales, precursoras de los sindicatos en el país. Las primeras, tendrán por base a gremios, industrias y áreas productivas; las segundas tendrán carácter similar, pero se asentarán en un espacio territorial dado. Cabe destacar que no se trataba de fronteras rígidas ni que estos tipos de organizaciones no se cruzaran en absoluto. Un hecho destacable de estas primeras experiencias de organización de la clase trabajadora, es que no se hacen sobre bases exclusivamente economicistas; se establecen sobre bases clasistas, estableciendo como labor principal el mejoramiento económico y moral de los trabajadores. No era raro, por tanto, que estas organizaciones no fueran concebidas como mera herramienta de lucha contra la patronal, sino también como auténticas universidades populares, en las cuales estudiaban, se practicaba la solidaridad y donde prefiguraban el mundo en el que querían vivir. En este contexto de organización y de agitación, nacen los primeros núcleos de actividad anarquista. A veces nacen como centros de estudios (el Centro de Estudios "Rebelión", donde participaba el notable activista y organizador Magno Espinosa, serán editores del primer periódico declaradamente anarquista del país, "El Rebelde", en 1898), otras veces como agrupaciones de carácter revolucionario (como la Unión Socialista de 1897, de cierta influencia ácrata), otras veces en torno a periódicos (a principios de siglo hay gran proliferación de prensa anarquista como son el Rebelde, el Ácrata, la Campaña, la Agitación, La Antorcha, el Alba, la Luz, etc....) y por último, aparecen decididamente como la orientación mayoritaria indeterminados gremios (habrán gremios que durante largo tiempo serán auténticos bastiones de las prácticas libertarias, como los estucadores, pintores de brocha, zapateros, obreros gráficos, panaderos, estibadores, etc....). Además, nacen en los principales centros industriales y productivos del país. Estos núcleos anarquistas recibieron un importante estímulo con la visita del notable anarquista italiano Pietro Gori al país el año 1900, donde aprovechó de dar unas charlas y conferencias. Las actividades de los anarquistas se desenvuelven en este entonces, casi exclusivamente en el campo de la organización de sociedades en resistencia y de las luchas en éstas, pasando a ser sector de punta en la lucha reivindicativa por dotar a la clase obrera de condiciones dignas de existencia, e intentando llevar esta acción reivindicativa al plano de las contradicciones de fondo que dieran paso al elevamiento de la conciencia revolucionaria. Los anarquistas propician el método de la acción directa, vale decir, la lucha frontal llevada adelante por los mismos trabajadores contra la parte patronal y tienen por principal arma de lucha la huelga, las cuales frecuentemente asumen un carácter violento, dado el hostigamiento del Estado y su aparato represivo y de la patronal y sus "guardias blancas" en contra de las justas demandas de los trabajadores. Por lo general, las demandas obreras encontraban por respuesta las balas policiales, militares o burguesas. Algunos ejemplos de esto, son las matanzas emblemáticas acaecidas durante la huelga del puerto de Valparaíso en 1903, en la que pierden en total la vida una cincuentena de obreros, la Semana Roja de Santiago, en 1905, donde el pueblo se movilizó en protesta por los precios de la carne, cayendo 250 compañeros, y la tristemente célebre masacre de la Escuela Santa María, en 1907, donde pierden la vida 3600 obreros. Por entonces, los anarquistas criollos no ven la necesidad de establecer una organización político-revolucionaria anarquista, y pretenden por el contrario, que las organizaciones sindicales asuman posiciones "partidarias" propias de la organización político-revolucionaria. Esta concepción anarco-sindicalista, que mezcla los roles de la organización de masas con los de la organización política (lo que no equivale a decir que a las organizaciones de masas no les corresponda asumir un rol revolucionario o posiciones tales), permanecerá por largo tiempo, casi hasta nuestros días, firmemente arraigada en el movimiento anarquista chileno. Otra de las luchas características del anarquismo en nuestro país, asumida también en gran medida desde las sociedades en resistencia, ha sido la lucha anti-militarista, de hecho una de las primeras actividades masivas convocadas por los anarquistas fue la protesta popular en contra del establecimiento del Servicio Militar Obligatorio (en 1900). Hacia 1905, se crea la primera tentativa de federar a distintas sociedades en resistencia: Se forma la FTCh (Federación de Trabajadores de Chile), la cual enfrenta una enconada agresión por parte del Estado y de los capitalistas, y no dura mucho por razones de inexperiencia y de agresión patronal. En esa tentativa, tiene un rol preponderante los anarquistas, puntal revolucionario del incipiente movimiento sindical. Este sello libertario y revolucionario impreso sobre las agrupaciones obreras será un mérito que corresponderá primordialmente a los ácratas. Nadie puede desmentir el inmenso y principal rol de los anarquistas en la labor constructiva, reivindicativa y organizativa de las primeras asociaciones de clase. Este rol sólo ha podido ser ocultado, forzando la historia de varias maneras, por la historia "oficial" y por historiadores comprometidos con ciertos proyectos partidarios lo cual les ha impedido ver con objetividad este hecho. A diferencia de otros rincones del continente en donde la propaganda anarquista llega principalmente bajo el influjo de inmigrantes de origen europeo (en EEUU con la inmigración alemana principalmente, y en Argentina principalmente por los italianos, como botón de muestra) en Chile, la propaganda anarquista de principios de siglo tiene por sujetos centrales a agitadores locales, de la talla de Magno Espinosa, Luis Olea, Víctor Soto Román, Esteban Cavieres, Carmen Herrera, Alejandro Escobar y Carvallo entre tantos otros, cuyos trabajos hasta el día de hoy presentan gran interés. Si bien esto no implica que no halla un Lombardozzi italiano organizando a los trabajadores en Chile o a un Antonio Ramón Ramón haciendo justicia apuñaladas (1914) en contra del general Silva Renard, quien había ordenado la matanza de la escuela Santa María siete años antes. Sin embargo, crucial resultará para el desarrollo de las ideas anarquistas en estas regiones, un intenso contacto con el movimiento en otros rincones del planeta, como era el constante envío de propaganda ácrata de Francia, España y Argentina (donde el movimiento se había desarrollado antes). (CONTINUARÁ) EL ANARQUISMO EN CHILE -2ª PARTE (1907-1927) Luego de la masacre de la Escuela Santa María de Iquique, en 1907, viene un lento período de recomposición del movimiento obrero y anarquista, que fue duramente golpeada y sufrió de este modo un fuerte revés. En 1908, en Antofagasta, en pleno corazón del norte, se agrupaba el Centro de Estudios Sociales "Luz y Vida", que editará su órgano del mismo nombre hasta 1917, tribuna desde donde irradiará el pensamiento libertario. Entonces, el anarquismo se recompondrá lentamente a partir de los gremios de su influencia, con la fundación de centros de estudios sociales. Más tarde aparecerá, en 1911, otro importante órgano anarquista en Valparaíso, esta vez, llamado "La Batalla". Más tarde aparecerá "La Verba Roja" (1918), y un sinnúmero de periódicos de gremios de influencia anarquista. Una vez más, será la prensa anarquista su principal punto de encuentro. Ya entrando en la década del ´10, se sostendrá un constante repunte de los anarquistas y de su actividad organizativa. Pero lo más notable, es que en esta época los anarquistas amplian su influencia más allá del sindicalismo revolucionario. En 1914 organizan la "Liga de los Arrendatarios", organización de carácter reivindicativo que llevará adelante las demandas de los arrendatarios de conventillos, respecto a cuestiones como los abusivos pagos de arriendo, las malas condiciones higiénicas, el hacinamiento, etc..... Incluso, se realizarán masivas negativas de pago de arriendos en protesta por las pésimas condiciones de vida. Por tanto, podemos considerar a los anarquistas como precursores no sólo de la organización sindical en nuestro país, sino que además, de las organizaciones "poblacionales". También aumentará la influencia de los anarquistas en las agrupaciones estudiantiles y hacia fines de esta década, la presencia anarquista se hará sentir muy fuerte en la FECh (Federación de Estudiantes de Chile, organización que agrupaba a los estudiantes universitarios y secundarios de la época, que posteriormente será sólo organización de los estudiantes de la U. de Chile), así como en la organización de una serie de grupos anarquistas estudiantiles, siendo quizás unos de los bastiones más importantes, la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Chile, donde actuará el grupo Lux. A su vez, en esta época verán su aparición una serie de agrupaciones que plantearán de manera orgánica la emancipación de la mujer. Si bien este tema no era ajeno a los y las anarquistas de principios de siglo, es en esta época que se forman una serie de "Uniones Femeninas" que agruparán a las mujeres en la lucha por igualar sus derechos con los hombres. Pero la organización sindical seguirá siendo el lugar de acción predilecto de los ácratas. De este modo se seguirán organizando las sociedades en resistencia y comenzarán nuevamente a proliferar las huelgas por las justas demandas de los obreros. Cuando en 1909 se funda la Gran Federación, que luego será conocida como la FOCh (Federación Obrera de Chile) muchos gremios de influencia anarquista participan en ella, pero aquí se manifiestan las diferencias entre los trabajadores de influencia socialista de los libertarios. Este hecho, hace que muchos anarquistas tomen distancia de la FOCh y se alejen definitivamente cuando en 1912, con la formación del POS (Partido Obrero Socialista), la FOCh quede como la cara sindical de esta agrupación política. Las profundas diferencias entre las expresiones políticas de la clase trabajadora, repercutirán en sus organizaciones sindicales. Los anarquistas buscarían su camino propio para la unidad de las Sociedades en Resistencia. Ya en 1911 los trabajadores del área de Magallanes habían formado la FOM (Federación Obrera de Magallanes), donde coexistirán tendencias socialistas y anarquistas, pero en donde la influencia de éstos últimos será progresivamente mayor con el correr de la década, hasta llegar a ser una federación con características definidamente libertarias. En 1913 se forma la FORCh, para agrupar a las sociedades en resistencia de tendencia libertaria. Hacia fines de 1919, se llama a un gran Congreso Obrero en Santiago, donde asisten delegados de múltiples ciudades del país (Talca, Concepción, Valparaíso, Corral, Antofagasta, Iquique, etc....), aparte de los capitalinos, el que dará nacimiento a la sección chilena de los IWW (Trabajadores Industriales del Mundo- Industrial Workers of the World ), con sólidos principios clasistas y que prenderá muy fuerte en todo el movimiento popular de la época. Su declaración de principios comenzaba diciendo "Entre la clase trabajadora y la clase patronal no hay nada en común", para terminar declarando que con la organización industrial de los trabajadores se formaba la estructura de la nueva sociedad dentro del cascarón de la vieja. Entre sus fines explícitos, estaba la lucha en contra del Estado, del Capitalismo, del régimen del trabajo asalariado y por combatir los prejuicios religiosos en las masas populares. Sus métodos de lucha eran la acción directa, el boycott, la huelga y el sabotaje. Planteaban la necesidad de llevar la lucha frontalmente en contra del sistema capitalista. Entre sus órganos de difusión estarán "Acción Directa" (Santiago), "El Proletario" (Talca), "Mar y Tierra" (Valparaíso), entre otros menores o de gremios. Entre sus más destacados dirigentes estarán Armando Triviño, el "milico" , quien será su primer secretario general, Juan Onofre Chamorro, un destacado dirigente y activista portuario del gremio de los estibadores, Juan Demarchi, obrero carpintero de origen italiano que instruirá en la "cuestión social" al aún adolescente Salvador Allende, Augusto Pinto, y los estudiantes Domingo Gómez Rojas y Juan Gandulfo. No se puede pensar en ningún caso, que la creación de este ente sindical, respondió a una copia mecánica a la experiencia de lucha de los obreros en otros lugares del mundo; no, la creación de los IWW en Chile era fruto de la maduración de la experiencia organizativa y de lucha propia de la clase trabajadora en Chile desde fines del siglo pasado a través de las sociedades en resistencia. Venía a coronar el proceso de trabajo sindical comenzado por gente como Magno Espinoza y Luis Olea principiando el siglo. Además, esta organización en Chile, representaba la necesaria convergencia de los trabajadores en todo el mundo, sobre bases internacionalistas, para enfrentar a un sistema global, como es el capitalismo. Consecuente con el internacionalismo, esta organización participaba en 1925 en el segundo congreso, en Amsterdam, de la nueva Asociación Internacional de Trabajadores de corte anarcosindicalista, fundada en Berlín en 1922. Si bien las disputas entre la FOCh y la IWW y los anarquistas, muchas veces con fundamentos y otras por puro sectarismo (con el que históricamente el socialismo atacó al comunismo anarquista), podían entorpecer el avance del movimiento, en realidad en la práctica y en muchas huelgas, las necesidades impuestas por la propia acción facilitaban la coordinación efectiva entre las dos agrupaciones obreras. Del mismo modo, existían espacios sociales en que anarquistas y la FOCh habían podido trabajar, como la Asamblea Obrera de la Alimentación (1918), instancia en donde se planteaban cuestiones urgentes del movimiento popular, como la carestía de la vida. Los anarquistas también pusieron fuertemente en práctica la unidad obrero-estudiantil. Es así como el secretario de notas del Congreso de 1919 que originará la IWW, será el estudiante Domingo Gómez Rojas, y como durante las huelgas estudiantiles por la Reforma Universitaria en 1922, donde destacará el ácrata Moisés Cáceres, la IWW se pliega al movimiento. Podemos ver también constantemente votos de "simpatía" en las asambleas de la FECh, hacia los IWW y la FOM. En 1926, se produce una escisión en el movimiento libertario con la fundación de la FORCh, por iniciativa de los obreros gráficos y de un pequeño grupo de gremios no representados en la IWW. Ello, por mayor afinidad con el modelo de federación por gremios (modelo seguido por la FORA argentina), así como producto de discusiones sectarias desde un mínimo grupo de anarquistas "principistas" que sobreideologizaron la discusión y que se mantenían en posturas puras, las cuales con el paso del tiempo, producirán un alejamiento de los anarquistas de su base social de apoyo. Las huelgas se sucedieron durante este período, sin que la patronal se mostrará mucho más blanda que a comienzos de siglo en su trato a los obreros "sublevados": en 1913 se produce en el puerto de Valapraíso la "huelga del mono", en contra de la obligación a los trabajadores ferroviarios de fotografiarse, ya que con esto se perseguía reprimir a los activistas, en 1917 se declara huelga general de los protuarios, en 1919 comienzan una serie de movimientos huelguísticos por las ocho horas de trabajo, el mismo año en Puerto Natales durante la huelga de los trabajadores del frigorífico Bories, se abre fuego a los huelguistas ocasionando muertes ("la comuna de Puerto Natales"), en 1920 los IWW llaman a una Huelga General en la Capital por la jornada de ocho horas y en contra de la carestía de la vida, en 1921 mueren 130 trabajadores de la oficina salitrera "San Gregorio" víctimas de la represión a la huelga, en 1925 se produce la matanza de obreros huelguistas en La Coruña, al sur de Iquique. Pero como fruto de esta actividad huelguística, se consiguen importantes avances en las condiciones de vida de los trabajadores: se logra la jornada de ocho horas, se logra el descanso dominical, se logra la responsabilidad de la patronal por accidentes de trabajo, se reglamenta el trabajo nocturno, entre otros logros, pero por sobre todo se logra fortalecer la conciencia de los trabajadores, se logra demostrar que la unidad, la organización y la lucha son las claves para el triunfo y se logra poner en cuestión al mismísimo sistema capitalista en el mundo obrero. También hay dos hechos que en el anarquismo de esos años marcan el alza del espíritu de luchas: el primero, en 1914, es el atentado de Antonio Ramón R., quien ataca a puñaladas, sin darle muerte, al asesino de Iquique general Silva Renard, responsable de la matanza de más de tres mil obreros huelguistas en 1907. El otro hecho, es el asalto al Banco de Chile, sucursal Mataderos, en 1925, por parte del connotado revolucionario español Buenaventura Durruti, junto a un grupo de anarquistas chilenos, para financiar la causa revolucionaria tanto en Chile, como en España. Los anarquistas de este período también realizan dos campañas internacionalistas de hondas repercusiones en el campo popular de ese período: la campaña de defensa a la Revolución Rusa, la cual es entusiastamente saludada por los anarquistas chilenos. Incluso, un titular de la "Verba Roja" llega a decir que la dictadura del proletariado está en camino del comunismo anárquico. Lamentablemente el posterior curso de los acontecimientos, no tardará en disipar dudas sobre el carácter burocrático que adoptaba la revolución, y en como el poder de los soviets, de genuina expresión de la clase obrera y del campesinado ruso, pasaba a convertirse en el poder dictatorial del partido bolchevique por sobre las masas populares. Esta evolución en la pareciación de la revolución rusa, puede apreciarse claramente en el periódico "Verba Roja". La otra campaña, es por la liberación de los anarquistas italianos en EEUU, Sacco y Vanzetti, los cuales, pese a las grandes protestas y a las campañas por su liberación en todo el mundo, mueren en la silla eléctrica en 1927. A medida que crece la influencia anarquista, comienza también a crecer la represión hacia estos grupos revolucionarios que adquirían una creciente influencia en el mundo popular. Así vemos en 1918 redactada una ley de residencia que sirve como excusa para expulsar del país a múltiples agitadores anarquistas de origen extranjero, pero de larga residencia en el país, como Aquiles Lemire, Casimiro Barrios, etc. El mismo año se encarcela al redactor del periódico anarquista "La Verba Roja", Julio Rebosio, por negarse a hacer el Servicio Militar, el cual es sometido a terribles vejaciones y torturas propias de épocas de la Inquisición. Vemos también múltiples hallanamientos a locales obreros y acusaciones infundadas de "dinamiteros" hacia los anarquistas criollos. En 1911 se realiza un montaje policial en que, a fin de excusar la represión a los anarquistas, los policías ponen dinamita en un convento. También entre 1923 y 1924 habrá una ola de "hallazgos" fraudulentos de dinamita en las sedes de los IWW de Iquique y Santiago, principalmente, lo que servirá para saquear esos locales y reprimir a un movimiento por razones puramente políticas. Del mismo modo, en 1920, se realiza la famosa "Guerra de don Ladislao". Ladislao Errázuriz, entonces Ministro de Guerra, ordena la movilización de tropas al norte y monta un espectáculo de peligro de guerra con Bolivia y con Perú. Así se logra crear un clima de fiebre patriotera que sirve para distraer a las masas de la crítica situación social del país, y se utiliza el montaje para justificar la represión a los anarquistas y a los IWW, acusados de estar financiados comn el oro peruano. Se lleva entonces, adelante uno de los procesos más injustos y vergonzosos en la historia del país, en que se saquea y ataca el local de la FECh, de los IWW, se destruye la imprenta anarquista Númen, se encarcela y tortura por centenares a los más destacados anarquistas de la época (muchos compañeros tuvieron que pasar entonces a la clandestinidad). Como resultado de este proceso, muere víctima de las torturas el estudiante Domingo Gómez Rojas. También ese mismo año (1920) se produce el incendio del local de la FOM en Punta Arenas (como coletazo de las matanzas de obreros en la Patagonia Argentina) donde morirán 306 obreros. Esta ola represiva acabará con el establecimiento de la dictadura de Ibáñez del Campo en 1927, momento en que el anarquismo será duramente reprimido, desarticulado, muchos de sus activistas serán encarcelados, relegados, fusilados, torturados y exiliados. http://struggle.ws/inter/groups/cuac/anarquismo_chile.html


    -- 1 El anarcosindicalismo en la calle MANY NAMES FOR REFERENCE PAGE 2 OF 2 (see previous record for first half)
    -Tendría que ser un poco más preciso... -Negociar la independencia de Cataluña al sur de los Pirineos. Dar las máximas seguridades posibles de que Cataluña libre sería como una Bélgica del sur. -Ello supondría dar cuenta a Briand de lo que llevamos entre manos. -Francia es, desde la gran revolución, el Estado policíaco por excelencia. Es de suponer que no ignoran nada de lo que se está haciendo. -No dudo de que tenga razón. Pero no me es posible dar un paso atrás. Los compromisos con Moscú me lo impiden. Ni aun queriendo cancelarlos, podría hacerlo. La ayuda económica que me concedieron ya fue invertida en parte. Pero vayamos a cosas concretas: ¿acepta ser consejero de Guerra de nuestro gobierno y llevar adelante su concepto de lucha a la irlandesa? -No, no acepto. -Si llegase el momento de cruzar los Pirineos, ¿vendría con nosotros? -Francamente, sí. Si para entonces estuviese todavía en Francia. Yo también tengo mis proyectos. Tenía proyectos y, además, me era forzoso trabajar. La ocupación de barnizador era entonces de las mejor retribuidas. Había pasado ya por varias de las grandes fábricas de muebles: Smith, Smith et Merle, Maple, Lazarovich y otras muchas. Los viernes, sábados y domingos los dedicaba a la vida bohemia, yéndome a visitar museos y monumentos por las mañanas, para recalar por las tardes en el café La Rotonde de Montparnasse, que frecuentaban algunos políticos catalanes y españoles y era lugar de cita de pintores y de sus encantadoras modelos, que aceptaban buenamente una invitación a cenar, aunque fuese en un restaurante de la cadena «Chez Pierre». Por las noches, nos dejábamos ver por Montmartre, a oír música en el café Aux Noctambules. Y platicar, invariablemente los mismos: Julio Aguilar, Alfonso Miguel y yo. Los días de trabajo nos reuníamos algunos compañeros en el café Combat, de la place Combat: José Luis, Aurelio Arroyo, Alfonso Miguel, Carichi, Sandoval, Aurelio Fernández, Julio Aguilar y yo; a veces, algunos más. Los dueños de los cafés de París estaban molestos con las peñas de refugiados españoles. Consideraban que éramos muy habladores, que alzábamos mucho la voz y que con un café nos pasábamos horas sentados. En aquellos tiempos existían un centenar de peñas de éstas. . En la place Combat procurábamos hablar en voz baja y al camarero le dábamos buenas propinas. Habíamos logrado que se nos tolerase. Un atardecer apareció un personaje de aspecto raro. Era alto, llevaba una gorra negra, lentes de miope, bata larga de gris oscuro. Se acercó a la mesa y dio un toquecito en la espalda a José Luis, compañero vasco simpático e inteligente, que llevaba ya tiempo en Francia. José Luis se levantó y fue tras el personaje, a quien conocía al parecer. Se quedaron hablando en la puerta del café que daba al bulevar Ménilmontant. Regresó José Luis algo preocupado, quedando, al parecer, en espera el personaje de la larga bata. Aurelio Fernández se encontraba junto a mí. José Luis nos dijo: -Es un anarquista ucraniano. Buen compañero, culto y prudente. Algo le debe ocurrir, pues ha venido a pedirme prestada una pistola. Se llama Schwarz ¿Qué hago, se la presto? -¿No te dijo para qué la quería? -le pregunté. -No, no me lo dijo. -¿No pensará suicidarse? --comentó Aurelio Fernández. -¡Quién sabe! Esos judíos... ¿Se la presto? No creo que esté desesperado, pues se gana bien la vida componiendo relojes. -Si lo haces, dala por perdida -le dije-. ¿Es que te sobran las pistolas? -No me sobran. Tengo una belga y una Parabellum que compré en el Marché aux Puces. -Bueno, préstasela -le dijimos. No nos acordamos más del compañero judío. Pero, transcurridos unos quince días, supimos de él. Mató a tiros al general ucraniano Petliura, verdugo de Ucrania durante los primeros tiempos de la revolución rusa y que se había distinguido organizando progroms contra los judíos. . La acción de Schwarz fue la sensación de aquellos tiempos. Mató a Petliura y no se dio a la fuga. Fue detenido y se explicó: Petliura había, mandado asesinar a centenares de judíos, entre ellos a toda su familia. El había escapado a la matanza por encontrarse luchando con los guerrilleros de Makhno. Cuando el curso de la revolución rusa le disgustó, se refugió en Francia. Supo de la llegada a París de Petliura y decidió ejecutarlo, después de haberlo juzgado en su fuero interno y haberlo encontrado culpable de crímenes monstruosos de lesa humanidad. Pudo haberlo matado desde el primer día de verlo salir del hotel, pero iba acompañado por su hija ¿Podía Schwarz ejecutarlo en presencia de la hija? Se dijo que no. Y lo siguió varios días, hasta que, por fin, Petliura salió del hotel solo. Se le acercó y a bocajarro lo mató. En París funcionaba un Comité Internacional Anarquista. A decir verdad, la internacionalidad del Comité no era mundialista, puesto que solamente contaba con la participación de algunas naciones, entre ellas Italia, representada por Schavina, y España, por Pedro Orobón Fernández. En España no existía todavía organización nacional anarquista. Los esfuerzos del grupo «Los Solidarios» por darle una organización nacional no tuvieron éxito, salvo el haber logrado celebrar en 1923, en Madrid, un Congreso nacional anarquista, de escasa concurrencia, y del que salió la creación de un Comité nacional de relaciones con sede en Barcelona, del que quedaron encargados Aurelio Fernández y Durruti. Venía siendo una dependencia del grupo «Los Solidarios». Todo se hundió con la represión anterior y durante la dictadura primorriverista. Hasta dejó de existir el grupo «Los Solidarios»[12]. La representación española en el Comité Internacional Anarquista sólo tenía el respaldo de los grupos anarquistas españoles diseminados en Francia. Con todo, la delegación española y la italiana eran las que representaban núcleos más numerosos. La italiana también representaba grupos anarquistas organizados en Francia, integrados por huidos de las persecuciones fascistas. Pedro Orobón Femández era un buen compañero. Vallisoletano, no se había distinguido en las luchas sindicalistas. En Francia, se dedicó a trabajar mucho, pues tenía que sostener, a más de su familia, a su hermano menor, Valeriano Orobón Fernández, que estudiaba. El escaso tiempo que le quedaba a Pedro lo dedicaba a leer: era bastante culto, aunque autodidacta. Y si le quedaba algo más, asistía a las reuniones de su grupo y a las del Comité Internacional. Conocía yo a Pedro superficialmente, de cuando intentamos crear la Alianza Revolucionaria de Sindicalistas y Anarquistas, de la que él fue oponente encarnizado, por su prurito de aparecer como anarquista cien por cien. Vino a verme al café Combat. Me rogó que le acompañase a la calle, pues deseaba hablar conmigo en privado. En la calle, me presentó a Schavina. Tenía el pelo rubio, algo rizado y los rasgos faciales como tallados con hacha. En un taxi nos fuimos los tres al café Henri IV de la place Italie. Nos sentamos en la terraza. -Anoche se reunió el Comité Internacional Anarquista -dijo Pedro-. La delegación italiana, por boca del compañero Schavina, trajo un mensaje escrito del compañero Malatesta, llamándonos la atención sobre la gravedad que supone para el porvenir la pervivencia del fascismo italiano, el peligro de que, como ha ocurrido en España, se manifieste por contagio en otras naciones. Concluía el mensaje diciendo que corresponde al anarquismo, líder de la libertad humana, cortar la cabeza del fascismo italiano, empezando por eliminar a Mussolini. En la imposibilidad de realizar tal empresa los anarquistas italianos, sometían el problema al anarquismo internacional, en espera de que algún grupo anarquista se hiciese cargo de ella. Los delegados internacionales debatimos ampliamente el mensaje de Malatesta, terminando por aceptarlo. Lo que equivalía a que todos aceptábamos la necesidad ineludible de ejecutar a Mussolini. Pero, ¿quién se encargaría del compromiso? Los italianos dijeron que ellos solamente podrían aportar facilidades a quienes se encargasen de hacerla, como documentaciones para el paso de la frontera, transportes seguros para llegar a Roma, casas de refugio en Roma y otras partes de Italia; pero que, en aquellos momentos, carecían del grupo o del hombre que pudiera hacerla. Y como ninguna de las representaciones internacionales se ofreció, me ví en el caso de tener que suscribir el compromiso por parte de España, pero a reserva de que yo consultase con el único grupo que podía realizar tal empresa. Sabía por Severin Ferandel que habían llegado de América Ascaso, Durruti y Jover, y que, junto con Aurelio Fernández, Alfonso Miguel y tú, formáis el grupo «Los Solidarios». Y aquí me tienes. Te lo planteo a ti y espero que lo lleves a tu grupo. -Es asunto muy delicado. Debo ac1ararte que, si bien en París nos encontramos la mayoría de los que lo integrábamos, «Los Solidarios» dejó de existir cuando sus miembros fuimos dispersados. Sin embargo, puedo promover una reunión de sus antiguos miembros con residencia en París y tratar el asunto. -Ignoraba que «Los Solidarios» hubiesen dejado de existir. Claro, que me llamó la atención que nunca apareciese en la Federación Local de Grupos la petición de alta de «Los Solidarios». Supuse que era para pasar desapercibidos. -Querría hacer algunas preguntas al compañero Schavina. Debes comprender que cuando alguien desea suicidarse no necesita de la colaboración de nadie. Nosotros entendemos que la acción no debe ser un acto suicida, sino un acto inteligente y concienzudo. Por ello le concedemos una gran importancia a los preparativos que faciliten la fuga de los que participan en las acciones. ¿Tendrían los compañeros que lo hiciesen la salida asegurada? Por otra parte, la empresa sería costosa. Digamos que se necesitarían no menos de cincuenta mil francos. Si «Los Solidarios» aportasen la mitad, ¿podríais los italianos aportar los otros veinticinco mil francos, o más? Observé bien a Schavina. Daba la sensación de valor. Meditó y me dijo: -Me gusta cómo planteas el asunto. Espero que la resolución de «Los Solidarios» sea afirmativa. Por mi parte, tengo que consultar a mis representados sobre el aspecto económico de la empresa. Lo mejor sería que nos encontrásemos tú y yo aquí mismo, dentro de cuatro días. -¿El sábado que viene, a las cuatro de la tarde? -Convenido. En efecto, Ascaso, Durruti y Jover habían regresado de América. Con ellos, desde la Argentina, había llegado un compañero que decía haberse formado en Barcelona, de donde huyó por el año 1919. Se llamaba Joaquín Cortés y daba la impresión de conocer nuestra ideología. Sabiendo que huyó de Barcelona cuando las cosas se pusieron duras en 1919, se podía suponer que se trataba potencialmente de un reformista. Por mi parte, no había visto con buenos ojos que aquellos compañeros se marchasen a América. Suponía una fuga de las responsabilidades en España. Y con menos buenos ojos veía su comportamiento en algunas de aquellas repúblicas. Sabíamos que García Vivancos los había dejado, disconforme con su proceder; y que a Toto[13] lo habían dejado preso en Cuba. «Desde el punto de vista moral -les dije- fue una empresa descabellada». Después, se habían marchado a Bruselas, donde Francisco Ascaso tenía a su hermano Domingo; y al regreso, encontrándonos Durruti, Francisco Ascaso, Aurelio Fernández, Alfonso Miguel y yo en una mesa del café Le Thermomètre de la plaza de la República, visiblemente embarazado, Ascaso nos dijo: -En Bruselas, Durruti y yo hemos tenido ocasión de estudiar algunos negocios que se nos han presentado. Nos gustó especialmente la oferta de traspaso de una gasolinera. Creo que la aceptaremos y nos marcharemos a vivir a Bruselas. Sentí que la sangre me hervía. Desde pequeño había sentido asco por dos dichos populares: «Siempre ha sido así, así es y así será» y «el muerto al hoyo y el vivo al bollo». -La verdad, para terminar en burgueses, se me antojan ridículas vuestras andanzas por América. Me levanté y salí a la calle. Me fui andando hasta mi hotelucho del bulevar Ménilmontant. El encargo que recibí de parte del Comité Internacional Anarquista podía alterar las cosas y hacer que se desvanecieran las tentaciones de aburguesamiento de tan excelentes compañeros. Casi tres años de no haber pisado España y de haberlos pasado en los medios anarquistas franceses. y. en naciones hispanoamericanas pudieron haber ejercido una maléfica influencia y hacerles pensar con gusto en la muelle vida de los burgueses, y hasta, ¿por qué no?, de los algo millonarios, como los beatíficos anarquistas franceses de Le Semeur, que, ya viejos, se reunían periódicamente para decidir sus donativos a los rebeldes de la sociedad. Al día siguiente me hablaron de ello Alfonso Miguel y Aurelio Fernández: -Hiciste muy bien, tanto en lo que les dijiste como en plantarlos. Aurelio Fernández, muy diplomático siempre, me dijo: -Tu rapapolvo puede hacerles vacilar en sus propósitos y hasta, creo yo, hacerlos desistir. Esta es la impresión que tengo, pues anduve con ellos hasta muy avanzada la noche y al día siguiente los acompañé a comer. Quedamos en que si era necesaria su presencia en París les pondría un telegrama a Bruselas. Al separarme de Pedro Orobón y de Schavina me dirigí de nuevo al café Combat, donde esperaba encontrar a Aurelio Fernández. Pensé que no debía inmiscuir en el asunto a Alfonso Miguel, pues sabía que siempre había sido terco en sus apreciaciones y que no se avendría a actuar al lado de Durruti y de Ascaso. Si Aurelio no encontraba aceptable participar en asunto de tal envergadura, debería reconsiderar si procedía llevar el asunto adelante, pues que de los antiguos miembros de «Los Solidarios» dos estarían en contra y solamente quedarían por decidir los votos de los que estaban en Bruselas. Sería, en el mejor de los casos, un empate, que solamente podría deshacer con mi voto. Y mi voto no podría de ninguna forma ser decisivo. Solamente con gran mayoría o con la totalidad de los votos a favor me decidiría por la aceptación. Aurelio Fernández se pronunció por la aceptación, siempre que el factor económico fuese solucionado según mi propuesta y el asunto fuese también aceptado por Ascaso, Durruti y Jover, quienes, a fin de cuentas, eran los que disponían de medios económicos para afrontar nuestro compromiso. Aurelio puso un telegrama a Bruselas y rápidamente se presentaron en París Ascaso y Durruti. Celebramos una reunión en la parte alta de un café próximo a la plaza de la República. Asistía también Gregario Jover, que sin pertenecer a «Los Solidarios» era conceptuado como un agregado de valía. Estuvieron todos de acuerdo. Pesó mucho el nombre de Malatesta y también la parte de su mensaje a los anarquistas del mundo que preveía los peligros que correría la libertad humana si la influencia fascista de Mussolini se propagaba por el mundo. Hube de aclarar mi definición sobre la inutilidad de los actos terroristas: En todo proceso revolucionario planteado en una determinada nación, los actos llamados terroristas entorpecen la marcha de la revolución. Sin embargo, dado que en aquellos momentos la situación de Europa era tan calamitosa, y no podía oponer una argumentación válida a la de Malatesta, me creía en el caso de sumarme a la voluntad de la mayoría de nuestro grupo. El acuerdo recaído fue contestar a Schavina que aceptábamos el compromiso; pero que los italianos deberían contribuir con no menos de quince mil francos, comprometiéndose «Los Solidarios» a aportar el resto. En realidad, los que se comprometían a aportar los fondos eran Jover, Ascaso y Durruti, que los habían traído de América. Aurelio y yo vivíamos estrechamente del sueldo diario y solamente en lo personal aportaríamos nuestra colaboración. El día convenido me reuní con Schavina. Procuré llegar un poco antes de la hora convenida. En su cara no leí ningún entusiasmo. Más que sentarse, se dejó caer en la silla. -¿Puedes decirme qué han acordado «Los Solidarios»? -Acordamos aceptar. Vuestra participación fue rebajada a un mínimo de quince mil francos. -Pues yo no tengo tan buenas noticias. La cuota se veinticinco mil francos que sugeriste nos pareció prudente, y yo pensaba que podríamos disponer inmediatamente del dinero necesario. Pero no disponíamos de él. Me han asegurado que, a lo más tardar dentro de diez días, podremos aportado. Con la variación que habéis acordado, espero que sea más fácil resolver nuestra participación. Comprendí que por el lado de los italianos la cosa no marchaba: -Schavina, nuestro grupo no quiere plantearos ninguna clase de problemas. Nuestra aceptación la tienes, así como el alcance de nuestra colaboración. Están surgiendo inconvenientes por parte vuestra. Ello debería bastar para que nosotros nos desdijésemos del compromiso inicial. No obstante, esperaremos los diez días que necesitaréis, pasados los cuales marchamos todos adelante o nos retiraremos nosotros. . Aurelio convocó la reunión del grupo. A todos les pareció muy bien que se hubiese señalado una fecha tope. Ascaso, Durruti y Jover estaban gastando su dinero y, de no hacerse nada, tendrían que tomar alguna decisión para normalizar sus vidas. Al cabo Aurelio y yo, en nuestros trabajos teníamos en qué pasar el tiempo y de donde sacar para ir viviendo. Llegó la fecha convenida para la entrevista decisiva. Me dijo Schavina que todavía no podían dar una contestación definitiva. Y que, si algo se resolvía, me buscaría en el café Combat. Y coincidió la expiración del plazo concedido a los compañeros italianos con la noticia de que los reyes de España estarían en París de paso para Inglaterra. En la reunión que tuvimos, Durruti se expresó de la siguiente manera: -Hemos de consideramos desligados de todo compromiso, de lo que me alegro, pues nos restituye la libertad para darnos un objetivo propio. Y quiero proponeros el objetivo: puesto que el rey estará en París de paso para Inglaterra, sugiero que analicemos las posibilidades de acabar con él. Tenía yo motivos más que fundados para oponerme a la propuesta de Durruti. En primer lugar, se trataba de operar en Francia, nación que nos había acogido; siempre consideré un error crear problemas de orden público en ella. En segundo lugar, la accidentalidad de querer aprovechar el paso por París del rey, excluía prácticamente la preparación del acto así como de la fuga de quienes lo llevaran a cabo. El acto tendría únicamente la significación de lo que se ha llamado «propaganda por el hecho», en lo que lo único que importa es el escándalo que produce, para lo cual sobrábamos, de los cinco comprometidos, cuatro. No me opuse a la propuesta de Durruti. Creo que mi silencio le contrarió más que si me hubiese opuesto. Opté por sumarme a la voluntad de la mayoría. Aurelio Fernández y yo dejamos que Ascaso y Durruti se encargaran de planear el atentado, de la adquisición de los medios de locomoción y los armamentos necesarios. Ellos poseían los medios económicos, nosotros tendríamos que trabajar hasta el último momento. Dos días antes del señalado por los periódicos para la llegada del rey, tuvimos la última reunión del conjunto. Aurelio me contó que la noche anterior le habían llevado a su casa las armas adquiridas a precio muy alto: tres fusiles de repetición y cinco pistolas Colt del 45, con abundantes municiones. Me contó también que hacía unos tres días, por mediación de un chófer de taxi, que pertenecía al Comité de grupos españoles de París, habían adquirido un imponente automóvil descubierto Fiat de segunda mano, con el que habían pensado atacar el auto del rey en la plaza de la Concordia, por donde se suponía que tendría que pasar. Así de sencillo: un auto, unos fusiles, unas pistolas y cinco hombres, con Durruti al volante. Parecía darse por descontado que no existiría barrera protectora para los reyes, ni gendarmes ni policías, ni cierre del tránsito por donde sería calculada la ruta. Se descontaba la eficiente preparación de la policía parisina, que seguramente ya llevaba unos días siguiendo los pasos de los refugiados y anarquistas españoles. Al oír lo que me contaba Aurelio, estuve tentado de no asistir a la reunión y de desentenderme del asunto. Me callé. Ignoro por qué asistió a la reunión el chófer de taxi que les había servido en las combinaciones que tuvieron que hacer para adquirir y trasladar las armas a casa de Aurelio, en la compra del automóvil y en el adiestramiento para conducirlo. Eran procedimientos en contradicción con aquellos a que nos ajustábamos los hombres de acción en Cataluña, que no dábamos jamás entrada a nadie en la intimidad de un grupo. Debí oponerme a la presencia intrusa del compañero chófer. No lo hice. Tenía el presentimiento de que surgiría una discrepancia que pondría fin al proyecto. No fue así. Durruti fue explicando su concepción del atentado. Ascaso oía y callaba, con su expresión, mezcla de ironía y escepticismo. Jover también oía, sin entusiasmo. Aurelio, impasible, como pensando que se las había visto en más duras. Decía Durruti: «En enfilando hacia el auto del fulano, los cuatro disparáis las armas en fuego cerrado. Yo conduciré el auto y Paco se sentará a mi lado, por si algo me ocurriera, poder tomar la dirección del volante. De salida, por el camino, os vais bajando del auto, cada cual por su lado, como si nada hubiera ocurrido; muerto el rey, concentrándonos todos en Barcelona, sería muy buena salida. ¿Qué opináis? Yo permanecí callado, en espera de que alguno hablase. En vista del silencio sepulcral de los otros tres compañeros, dije: -Se me ocurre preguntar: ¿Habéis pensado en la manera de hacer desaparecer el automóvil? Concretamente, si el automóvil ha sido robado o contrabandeado, es asunto concluido. Pero si ha sido comprado, el vendedor, al aparecer en la prensa sus características, se dará por enterado, dirá a la policía quién lo adquirió y con el cabo del hilo pronto darán con el ovillo. Intervino el chófer: -El automóvil ha sido adquirido legalmente. El dueño del negocio es conocido mío y persona de confianza. Supongo que habréis pensado en hacerlo desaparecer; por ejemplo, pegándole fuego. Repliqué: -Hacer desaparecer un automóvil no es cosa fácil, y menos pegándole fuego. Los motores tienen la numeración en el metal, cosa que no desaparece con el fuego. Me di cuenta, por la cara que estaba poniendo el chófer, de que no había calculado que él sería el primer inculpado. Y me pregunté hasta dónde podrían conducirlo sus cavilaciones. No había visto todavía el automóvil adquirido. Por lo que contaron, se trataba de un raro ejemplar Fiat, descubierto, largo e imponente. Todo lo contrario de lo que hubiese convenido, siquiera para hacerlo desaparecer entre los miles de automóviles que circulaban por Francia. Me iba explicando por qué el paso por América del trío Ascaso, Durruti y Jover había estado en las primeras páginas de todos los periódicos: no daban un golpe, por insignificante que fuese, sin que apareciesen sus nombres al día siguiente en las primeras planas de los diarios sensacionalistas. Finalmente, quedamos en que nos encontraríamos dos días después en una esquina del quai Valmy, a las ocho de la mañana, para practicar una especie de simulacro de penetrar, cruzar y salir de la plaza de la Concordia. Aurelio y yo nos dirigimos al metro de la plaza de la República. Yo iba pensativo. Aurelio me preguntó: -¿Te ocurre algo? -No, nada. Estaba pensando en cómo serán las celdas de Fresnes. -¿Tan mal lo ves? -Lo veo como tú lo ves. Primero, la presencia del chófer en la reunión, que por lo visto está enterado de todo. Ni él ni los otros habían pensado en cómo hacer desaparecer el automóvil. Este detalle lo dice todo. Cada cual marchará por su camino, tú al taller de ajuste mecánico, yo a la fábrica de muebles; tú a tu domicilio de siempre y yo a mi chambre del bulevar Ménilmontant... Como si en París no existiese la policía. ¿Cuánto dinero tienes en tu poder? Yo tengo lo justo para la comida hasta el sábado, día de cobro, si no ha ocurrido nada. -Pues yo, como tú, tengo también lo justo. María debe tener tres o cuatrocientos francos de ahorros de su trabajo. Por cierto, que esta noche le diré que se vaya unos días a Bruselas, con su hermana Libertad, la compañera de Domingo. La tarde del día siguiente me encontré a Aurelio en el café Combato Había acompañado a María a la estación. -Si quieres -me dijo-, esta noche puedes dormir en casa, de manera que por la mañana ya te lleves tu colt. -Y tú, ¿dónde vas a dormir? -En el departamento de al lado, donde vive una italianita que me saca de apuros sexuales, ya que María está muy enferma. Enferma o no María, lo cierto es que Aurelio andaba siempre zascandileando por donde hubiese faldas. A las cinco de la mañana, me arreglé, afeitándome bien. Aurelio apareció, eufórico como siempre. -Con la noche que he pasado, que me quiten lo bailado. También yo presiento el desastre a que nos conducirá ese «chalao» de Durruti. Como ellos tienen el dinero, nosotros a callar. Hasta las siete y media estuvimos en el café de la esquina, cerca del metro, que tomamos para ir hacia los muelles de Jemmapes y de Valmy. Vimos a Jover, que se encontraba ya en la esquina convenida. Pasamos junto a él. Nos colocamos al otro lado del sitio acordado, a más de doscientos metros, tras una barda de maderos que nos tapaba hasta la cabeza. Las ocho, y no habían llegado. A las ocho y cinco apareció un auto y después otro, de los que descendieron ocho individuos. Seguramente eran policías. A aquella hora, pocas personas transitaban por los muelles y nos fue posible deslizarnos sin llamar la atención. En la esquina siguiente, cruzamos la calle y desaparecimos. Quisimos convencernos de la chamusquina. Jover penetró en un bar y telefoneó al hotel donde se hospedaban Ascaso y Durruti, preguntando por sus nombres falsos. Le respondió el empleado: -Espere un momento, voy a ver si están en la habitación. Después dijo: -De parte de los señores, que venga usted al hotel, que aquí lo esperan. Nos despedimos de Jover, quien nos dijo que se iba a la casa de campo con su compañera, y quedamos en encontrarnos al día siguiente. Aurelio y yo nos fuimos al bosque de Vincennes. En adelante, teníamos varios problemas, los inevitables de quienes viven al margen de la ley. Y algo más grave: la falta de dinero para ir y venir, alquilar una habitación en cualquier «hotel meublé», para lo que hay que hacerse acompañar de una pobre trotacalles. Era indudable que estábamos ante una acción de soplonería. ¿De quién? Cuando se es imprudente, el menor descuido puede servir de delación. Nosotros -en fin, Ascaso y Durruti- nos habíamos conducido a la manera de Macià, que salía al bosque a practicar ejercicios paramilitares con sus muchachos y al mismo tiempo se preocupaba por la idea de que el gobierno francés pudiese enterarse de lo que estaba haciendo. A mediodía dejamos el parque de Vincennes y nos fuimos a comer a un restaurante barato de la plaza de Clichy. Ya habíamos empezado a comer cuando a nuestro lado se sentó un señor. En espera de su comida, sacó un periódico y se puso a leerlo. Me quedé aterrado al ver en lo alto de una página las cinco fotografías de los peligrosos anarquistas que pensaban matar a los reyes de España, y le dije a Aurelio: -Terminemos y vayámonos. Ya en la calle, compré el periódico. Fuimos a tomar café a la avenue Clichy. Como el que teme que se le escape un pajarito, fui abriendo el periódico. Sí, allí estábamos los cinco: Ascaso, Durruti, Jover, Aurelio y yo. ¿Por qué no estaba la fotografía del chófer? Pagamos y nos fuimos. A partir de aquel momento, iríamos siempre juntos, pero separados uno del otro. Con urgencia teníamos que resolver la escasez de dinero. Según Aurelio, sería bueno ponernos en contacto con Severin Ferandel. Le telefoneó desde un gran café. -Dentro de dos horas estará con nosotros en el mismo café donde tenemos cita con Jover. Así que lo mejor es ir para allá. Jover nunca llegaba tarde a una cita. Se presentaba a ellas con un cuarto de hora de anticipación, para descubrir cualquier persona o movimiento sospechoso. Todavía no había visto el periódico. Lo vio y dijo: -Yo me voy. Lo mejor es escondernos. Se levantó y se fue, dejándonos su café por pagar. Ni Aurelio ni yo sabíamos adónde iría a esconderse. ¿Lo sabría el chófer? Llegó Ferandel. Hablamos solamente en francés. -¿Puedes ayudarnos a salir de este apuro? -¿No os habían dejado dinero antes de las detenciones? -No, nos dejaron nada. Hasta Jover se ha ido hace un momento y no pagó su café, contestó Aurelio. -Veré a algunos de los viejos anarquistas de Le Semeur. ¿Podemos encontrarnos aquí mismo mañana a las once? -Sí, contestó Aurelio. Se levantó, dejando encima de la mesa un billete de cien francos. -Pagad los cafés y quedaros con la vuelta. Hasta mañana. Fuimos a meternos a un cine cerca de la plaza de Clichy. Hasta en el cine estábamos separados. A la salida cenamos un bocadillo en una cervecería. Ya eran cerca de las doce de la noche y no habíamos resuelto dónde pasar la noche. Aurelio tenía su solución, podía ir a dormir a casa de una amiga, no la italiana, sino otra. Yo no podía aspirar a lo mismo. Tenía una amiga, pero no sabía de ella otra cosa que era una guapa bretona, que dos veces por semana aparecía en mi habitación. -¿Crees poder arreglarte por esta noche?, me preguntó Aurelio. -Sí, siempre que me dejes disponer de la vuelta del billete de Ferandel. -No hay problema. Dispón como gustes. Nos encontraremos en el café convenido con Ferandel. A pie fui hasta la plaza de la República. Cerca del Temple me pareció haber topado con lo que necesitaba: una mujer con quien alquilar una habitación de un hotel donde no era necesario llenar ningún formulario. Ella me dijo que sólo podría estar conmigo una hora, lo que me venía de perlas. Se fue y me quedé profundamente dormido; en aquellos tiempos, cuantas más preocupaciones tenía, más intensamente dormía. Cuando me desperté, ya eran más de las nueve de la mañana. Ya en la calle, fui acercándome a pie al café donde teníamos la cita. Apareció Aurelio, que entró en el café. Esperé todavía un buen rato, por si salía corriendo o entre policías. No salió y yo penetré a mi vez en el café. En una mesa estaban Aurelio, Ferandel y un desconocido, pulcramente vestido, de unos sesenta años. Se trataba de un miembro del grupo Le Semeur. Ferandel nos entregó a Aurelio y a mí un fajo de billetes de cien francos, colaboración solidaria de los miembros del grupo. Antes de despedimos, Ferandel nos dijo que el compañero Manuel Pérez, a quien conocíamos, nos esperaría sentado en un banco de la estación de ferrocarril de la Pie-Saint Maur, de cinco a seis de la tarde, para llevamos a una familia anarquista italoportuguesa que nos ofrecía refugio en su casa. Allí llevábamos una vida apacible. Para los vecinos, pasábamos por primos de los portugueses. Cerca de donde vivíamos, se deslizaba el Marne y por sus riberas dábamos largos paseos. Me gustaba contemplar a los pescadores de caña, gente pacífica, que raramente lograban sacar un pez, por lo regular muy pequeño. A Aurelio le disgustaba el espectáculo de aquellos hombres, jóvenes o de mediana edad, que se pasaban horas y horas con la caña en las manos. -Aunque no lo creas -le expliqué-, esos fulanos están ahí para disimular. Son los «gigolos» o «souteneurs» de las troteras de París; apaches convertidos en pequeños rentistas; de noche vigilan a sus pupilas y el día lo pasan pescando, en espera de la hora del aperitivo. Aurelio se reía. Pensaba que los francos de los anarquistas de Le Semeur se habían de acabar. ¿Y entonces, qué? Cuando el tacto me confirmaba la existencia de los billetes en el bolsillo, sentía ganas de vomitar. Era todo lo contrario del «revolucionario profesional». Nunca había gastado ningún dinero que no hubiese sido ganado por mí ¿Cómo saldríamos de aquella situación? ¿Qué hacer? Optamos por ir a Bruselas. Acaso en Bélgica podríamos normalizar nuestras vidas. Estuvimos poco tiempo en Bélgica. Era difícil para los extranjeros encontrar trabajo en aquel país. Y más difícil aún lograr una estancia legal como trabajador. Domingo Ascaso y Libertad se desenvolvían difícilmente, por no serle a él posible trabajar en su oficio de panadero. La economía doméstica era sostenida por ella, que logró salir adelante como echadora de cartas. Nos quedaba el recurso de irnos a América. Para Aurelio, por ser asturiano, la marcha al otro lado del Atlántico no ofrecía grandes inconvenientes. Existían fuertes núcleos de asturianos desde los Estados Unidos hasta la Argentina. En cambio, las colonias de catalanes eran exiguas donde las había. Optamos por regresar a España. En Madrid nos esperaba una gran tarea. Haríamos el regreso por etapas. París primero, a continuación Pamplona y finalmente Madrid. El cruce de la frontera pensábamos hacerla el 12 de octubre, día de la Virgen del Pilar, patrona de la Guardia civil; calculamos que por esa razón estaría libre la frontera de su vigilancia y que también estarían libres las carreteras hasta llegar a Pamplona. En París pasamos poco tiempo. Aurelio se las arregló como pudo. Yo me fui al hotel donde habitaba Callejas y compartí la habitación con una muchacha alavesa que prestaba servicios domésticos en algunas casas. Enviamos a Pamplona a un compañero de los que acudían al café Combat, Aurelio Arroyo, para que se pusiera en contacto con Muñoz y juntos estudiasen el objetivo señalado para aquel punto. Pamplona era la primera etapa de una marcha que culminaría en Madrid, donde pensábamos ajustarle las cuentas a Primo de Rivera. Antes de partir, hice una visita a Macià en Bois-Colombes. Desde Bruselas había escrito a Ventura Gassol previniéndole de que sería conveniente que cambiaran cuanto hubieran realizado sirviéndose de nuestro chófer de taxi, que parecía ser quien nos traicionó. Era también el chófer utilizado por Macià para el transporte a la frontera de unos armamentos adquiridos en la armería Flaubert del bulevar Saint Michel. Mi llegada a la rue des Bourguignons fue apoteósica. Quien primero vino a abrazarme fue Ventura Gassol, seguido de Comte y otros. Macià me abrazó con lágrimas en los ojos, y me explicó la causa de la sensación que produjo mi aparición. Me mostró unos periódicos donde aparecía la noticia de que «a la salida de un hotelucho de Aubervilliers, un español llamado Juan García había sido asesinado de un tiro de fusil que le dispararon desde un automóvil apostado cerca». Y como se sabía que con motivo del atentado frustrado a los reyes habían llegado pistoleros de Barcelona, Macià y los suyos habían supuesto que habían puesto fin a mis días. Después supe que en Reus mi familia se había vestido de luto. Le pregunté a Ventura Gassol si había recibido mi carta. -Sí, la recibí. Hemos alterado todo lo posible lo hecho. Macià me habló aparte: -Vidiella dejó su puesto en el gobierno catalán. El puesto ha sido asignado a Andrés Nin, que está en Berlín y ha prometido incorporarse en cuanto se lo permita la misión que está realizando allí. Por lo que he sabido, Vidiella ha regresado a España y no piensa volver a Francia. Me había prometido la colaboración de unos grupos. Ahora ya no cuento con ellos. Una vez más, le ofrezco el puesto de ministro de la Guerra, para, si fracasa nuestra empresa militar a través de los Pirineos, proseguirla a la manera irlandesa. ¿Acepta? -No, pero se lo agradezco. Su fracaso no permitirá llevar los asuntos más adelante. Por haber utilizado como base de operaciones su suelo, lo primero que hará el gobierno francés será expulsarles… Vidiella había sido sustituido por Andrés Nin, agente soviético, punta de lanza de la penetración comunista en España, convencidos ya los rusos de que sus tentativas en Andalucía estaban abocadas al fracaso. Barcelona era la verdadera capital social de España y el comunismo no había encontrado dónde asirse en ella, por estar el mundo del trabajo dominado por anarquistas y sindicalistas revolucionarios. [7] [NDE]. El autor vuelve sobre este problema en las páginas 83-84, 115, 120-122, 634-635. [8] [NDE]. El autor vuelve sobre estos hechos en otro lugar. Véase la página 633. [9] [NDE]. Véanse las páginas 629-630. [10] [NDA]. Siempre he leído mucho, de todo lo que ha caído en mis manos. Y también he leído sin método. Catorce años de prisiones y leyendo cuanto me era permitido por la disciplina carcelaria y por el tiempo, me han dado un conocimiento general del mundo y de los humanos que lo habitan. No he seguido cursos de literatura ni de poética. Pero sí de una orientación precisa, sin la cual acaso hubiese llegado el momento en que leer hubiese resultado pesado. Creí -y sigo creyendo- que siendo un lector lento, los conocimientos contenidos en los libros irían formando un sedimento de cultura general en mi cerebro, que podría serme de gran utilidad por la dirección que di a mis lecturas: la oratoria. La oratoria tenía que llevarme a realizar análisis politico-sociales e históricos rápidos. El ser lector lento me permitía absorber mayor cantidad de saber que si hubiese sido de lectura rápida. Aún hoy recuerdo con delectación cuando en la soledad de la celda, sumido en la lectura de una página, me detenía, me frotaba las manos y me ponía a liar un cigarrillo, colocando parsimoniosamente la pizca de tabaco en la palma de la mano, limpiaba de palos la picadura, la trituraba lentamente entre las dos palmas, la igualaba en el papel de fumar, lo liaba, por la parte engomada y lo retorcía con delicadeza, de manera que saliese un cigarrillo digno de aquella pausa. Leía y releía la página o el párrafo y finalmente le prendía lumbre al cigarrillo. He leído en catalán, castellano y francés. Y también en valenciano, como La pau des poblets. Clásicos y franceses y castellanos, latinos del Imperio y los de la decadencia. Y más y más. Leí a los griegos, a Tales de Mileto, a Heráclito de Efeso. Conozco a Antístenes y a Diógenes, a los cínicos. Sé de los estoicos, de Teofastro, de Marco Aurelio; de Sócrates y sus diálogos recogidos por Platón y de las anécdotas narradas por Jenofonte. Sobre Sócrates y Jesucristo, uno de los dos paralelos que me sirvieron de tema para dos conferencias en el Sindicato Textil de Barcelona. Paralelismo que causó sensación, siendo el otro paralelo el de Ulises y Don Quijote. Estos paralelos dieron lugar a que Eduardo de Guzmán escribiera en La Tierra un artículo. Eduardo de Guzmán, entonces redactor jefe del periódico La Tierra, que cubría en aquellos momentos, con sus logrados reportajes, la accidentada vida social de Barcelona, asistió a mis conferencias en el Fabril de Barcelona, en la barriada del Clot, y de regreso a Madrid, habló de ellas con el presidente. o el secretario general del Ateneo. Este le encargó que me pidiese reproducirlas en el Ateneo madrileño. Mi contestación fue, claro, muy mía: que «yo no tenía que enseñarles nada a los intelectuales burgueses» y que «lo que yo estaba haciendo con el ciclo de conferencias agrupadas bajo el título general de El espíritu de la victoria era capacitar a la clase obrera para la lucha y el triunfo». Por aquel entonces batí los récords en mítines y conferencias en toda España. En Zaragoza, en el Palacio de la Lonja, di. una conferencia medida para un tema de treinta horas con el título de La reconstrucción del mundo. Hube de comprimirla por apremios de tiempo a seis conferencias diarias de cuatro horas cada una. Si al empezar la primera puede decirse que la mayor parte de los asistentes eran obreros, al terminar la última, la asistencia resultaba pareja entre obreros, por un lado, y profesores, abogados, ingenieros y otros representantes de la intelectualidad. Al día siguiente, domingo, dimos un gran mitin en la plaza de toros y de allí me fui a Bilbao, donde me esperaba Horacio Prieto para los mítines que había organizado como secretario de la Regional del Norte, en Bilbao, Baracaldo y Sestao. La misma conferencia de treinta horas la reproduje en la cárcel Modelo de Barcelona poco tiempo después, encontrándome preso con bastantes compañeros, entre ellos Alaiz, para responder a unos artículos aparecidos en Solidaridad Obrera. [11] [NDA]. Bandera Roja, sin ser expresión oficial de los sindicalistas revolucionarios, había representado la tendencia más influenciada por la revolución rusa -1917-1919- y Bandera Negra, sin ser expresión oficial de ninguna tendencia dentro de la CNT, había tratado de ejercer un control sobre los militantes de élite como Seguí. Pestaña, Simón Piera y otros. La propia CNT era casi inexistente, excepción hecha de algunos sindicatos en Barcelona (Madera, Construcción, Metalúrgicos, Alimentación y algunos más de menos importancia). Fue a partir del Congreso Regional de Sans en el año 1919 cuando el sindicalismo confederal empezó a luchar en grande contra la patronal y a expandirse por toda Cataluña. Los de Bandera Roja eran propensos a ejercer el terrorismo de grupo y los de Bandera Negra lo condenaban, si bien se gloriaban de hechos individuales. Los de Bandera Roja eran partidarios de los sindicatos y los de Bandera Negra no. Por entonces, ni los de la Roja ni los de la Negra influían considerablemente en la Organización confederal. [12] [NDE]. Sobre «Los Solidarios» y «Nosotros», véanse las páginas 92-98, 125-128, 133-136, 161-164, 188-189, 190-191 Y 629-633. [13] [NDA]. Buen castellano, excelente, fue de los que llegaron a Barcelona tras Durruti, todos de León. Nadie se preocupó de él cuando cayó preso en La Habana. Parece ser que salió en libertad mucho tiempo después. Pero nunca buscó contacto con sus antiguos amigos y compañeros de «Los Solidarios». Regresa http://www.kehuelga.org/biblioteca/eco/03calle.htm



    -- Anarcosindicalista. De formació autodidacta l'any 1902 intervingué en unes batusses, durant la vaga dels metal.lúrgics, i el detingueren durant unes hores. Participà en les reunions preparatòries del Congrés de “Solidaritat Obrera” de 1907, i amb tota probabilitat assistí al congrés constitutiu delebrat el dia 3 d'agost de 1907, però no en tenim constància. L’11-08-1907 fou empresonat durant nou mesos, per uns aldarulls en el Teatre Comtal de Barcelona, on resultà mort el lerrouxista Soteres. Assistí al congrés constitutiu de la Confederació Regional de Societats de Resistència - Solidaritat Obrera Barcelona- (Barcelona 07-09 de setembre de 1908) i mesos més tard va formar part, com a vocal, del seu Consell directiu. Sembla que prengué part activa en els fets de la Setmana Tràgica (juliol-agost de 1909) i després hagué de fugir de Barcelona. (S’establí a Gualba, Vallès Oriental), però cal dir que alguns autors mantenen que no hi participà dient que en aquelles dates es trobava treballant fora de Barcelona. Nosaltres ens decantem per la seva participació seguint les memòries dels testimonos de l’època. També hem llegit que va participar en el segon congrés de la Confederació Regional -Solidaritat Obrera- (Barcelona, 30, 31 d'octubre i 1 de novembre de 1910), cosa lògica veient la trajectòria del Noi del Sucre, però no l’hem localitzat en la relació d’assistents. Formà part de l'organització i assistí al primer Congrés de la CNT (Barcelona, 1911) representant la societat de pintors La Nueva Semilla. L'any 1913, dirigí la revista "Tramontana" editada en català. L’any 1915 va ser elegit president de la Federació local del Ram de la Construcció de Barcelona. El 1916, formant part del Comitè de la CRTC (algunes fonts el situen com a secretari del Comitè) assisteix a la Conferència de València del maig de 1916 i allí va propossar un pacte d’unitat d’acció amb la UGT. El pacte es va signar a Saragossa el 20/11/1916. Aquest acord comportà l’acció conjunta en la vaga general de 24 hores del 18 de desembre de 1916 protestant per l’encariment de les subsistències. Va ser el moviment vaguístic més unànim que s’havia fet a l’Estat. Pero el Govern de l’Estat no en va fer cas, i Seguí va promoure un nou impuls del pacte amb la UGT. Així el 27 de març signen a Madrid un manifest anunciant que les dues centrals sindicals organitzarien una vaga general indefinida si el govern “no realitza els canvis fonamentals en el sistema per a garantitzar al poble les mínimes condicions decoroses de vida i el desenvolupament de les seves activitats emancipadores”. La resposta del Govern va ser suspendre les garanties constitucionals i empresonar els firmants del manifest. (Els firmants eren Salvador Seguí, Ángel Pestaña i Ángel Lacort de la CNT i Francisco Largo Caballero i Julián Besteiro per la UGT). L'anunciada vaga general indefinida es va convertir, amb el suport del PSOE, en vaga revolucionària. La vaga prevista per l’estiu va esclatà el dia 13 d’agost. El Govern va declarar l’estat de guerra i va treure l’exèrcit al carrer provocant més de 70 morts (34 a Catalunya) centenars de ferits i prop de dos mil treballadors foren empresonats. Salvador Seguí va ser l’impulsor de la filosofia i de la praxis del Sindicat de Ram o Indústria (el Sindicat Únic), ho va proposar en el Congrés de Sants (1918). La proposta va ser acceptada i assumida pels delegats del Congrés i a més fou elegit secretari general de la CRTC. Aquesta nova organització dels sindicats, que tant clarividentment va formular Seguí, seria el punt de suport de l’expansió de la CNT cap a tot l’Estat. En el míting de clausura del congrés, el Noi del Sucre acabà la seva intervenció dient: Treballadors de Barcelona que heu segellat amb el vostre entusiasme la tasca del congrés regional, camarades delegats que, en representació de la Catalunya que pensa i treballa, assistiu als treballs del congrés, l’epíleg del qual fem aquesta nit, jo, en nom vostre, saludo a tots els explotats de la terra que, com nosaltres, esperen el regnat de la justícia i de la llibertat. Cal dir, situant-nos en el context de l’any 1918, que a la resta de l’Estat l’organització de la CNT estava en fase embrionària. El primer de maig de 1918 s’havia constituït la Confederació Regional Andalusa. El desembre de 1918 es constituiria la Confederació Regional de Llevant, i fins l’any 1921 no es va constituir la Confederació Regional Galega. Despres, durant la campanya endegada en pro de l'autonomia de Catalunya (1918-19), Salvador Seguí escrivia el 15 de desembre de 1918, ... parlen en nom de Catalunya els qui a Catalunya són execrats i parlen en nom de la llibertat d’un poble, els qui mantenen una hegemonia recolzada amb les baionetes del poder central. I encara més el 13 de gener de 1919 escrivia en el periòdic "El Diluvio" ... nosaltres volem que Catalunya no sigui una colònia com aquestes que tenen els senyors fabricants de Barcelona, en les quals està esclavitzant els obrers. Nosaltres volem que Catalunya sigui un poble lliure, conscient i ben administrat. Nosaltres som més catalans que ells, que tant presumeixen de catalanisme. Tampoc no volem fer el joc al poder central, donat que només espera l’ocasió que els homes de l’autonomia siguin impotents o qualsevol altre motiu per negar-la, pretextant que no poden dominar ni saben governar els diversos elements que componen Catalunya. A finals del mes de gener de 1919, fou empresonat en el vaixell "Pelayo" i després a la presó model de Barcelona. Més tard, per al dia 19 de març de 1919, el comitè de la vaga de la Canadenca va convocar una multitudinària assemblea a la plaça de toros Les Arenes de Barcelona, per ratificar els acords presos amb el Govern: S’aixecaria l’estat de guerra, es tornaria la llibertat als treballadors empresonats per la vaga, es procediria a la readmissió dels acomiadats i a l’obertura dels sindicats i s’establiria per decret la jornada màxima de treball 8 hores. Després de 44 dies de vaga pacífica es podia donar per acabada la vaga, perquè, com va dir Simó Piera membre del comitè de vaga, la victòria de la CNT, la victòria dels treballadors, era inqüestionable. El dia 19 de març al vespre, amb una plaça de braus plena de gom a gom, Simó Piera va obrir l’assemblea donant a conèixer els acords a que havia arribat el comitè de vaga i Salvador Seguí (que havia estat alliberat aquell mateix matí) va fer el parlament final. Diversos historiadors i testimonis de l’època han coincidit en assenyalar que la intervenció de Seguí, amb la presència de tots els radicals i extremistes de moviment obrer, fou d’una antològica solidesa i convicció. A finals de 1919 Salvador Seguí va assistir al segon congrés confederal de la CNT (Congrés del Teatre de la Comèdia, Madrid 10-18 de desembre de 1919). Entenem que la seva intervenció en la última sessió, sobre la tercera internacional, és una altra constatació de la vàlua sindical de Salvador Seguí. El dia 4 de gener de 1920 va patir un atemptat del què en sortì il.lès, i el dia 6 tornava a ésser empresonat. Va romandre a la presó fins l’arribada d’un nou governador, Frederic Carles Bas, el 22 de juny de 1920. Però Seguí com a estandat de l’anarcosindicalisme de la CNT, continuava essent perseguit per l’oligarquia dominant (fabricants i militars) i tot i que no havia estat cap vegada processat, amb la sagnant repressió del general Martínez Anido fou altra vegada empresonat i aquesta vegada deportat al reducte militar del castell de la Mola de Maó (30-11-20). En aquesta estada a la presó Seguí va escriure diversos articles sobre la funció del sindicalisme. Romangué deportat fins l'abril de 1922. Després de sortir de la presó i fins els més de juny realitzà més de cent actes públics pel País Valencià, Madrid i Andalucia. Assistí al Ple de regionals de Saragossa (11 de juny 1922). En aquest Ple Salvador Seguí i Ángel Pestaña van presentar una proposició (que fou aprovada) sobre la retirada de la CNT de la Tercera Internacional. El desembre de 1922 va ser elegit Secretari del Comitè de la CNT. Fou assassinat, juntament amb Francesc Comas, per Inocencio Feced Calvo pistoler del "Lliure" al carrer Cadena de Barcelona, el 10 de març de 1923 (veieu la nota A). L'oligarquia empresarial escapçava el moviment obrer pel lloc que més por li feia: la direcció assenyada. Només una nota final, la que va publicar “Solidaridad Obrera” l’endemà del seu assassinat: Seguí, com els que escrivim aquest full, com els que actuen a les organitzaciones sindicalistes, havia procurat portar la calma i la tranquilitat a l’esperit dels companys exaltats. Havíem procurat calmar les impaciències d’alguns perquè Barcelona no caigués de nou en les lluites pretèrites que ens han de valer el qualificatiu de bàrbars. I així heu corresponst a aquest esforç assassinant-lo miserablement, cobardament, traidorament. Nota A. Josep Peirat en el llibre La CNT en la revolución española. Editorial Ruedo Ibérico. París, 1971.Volum I pàg. 34 escriu: “Se planeó el atentado por la Patronal i el “libre”. Tomaron parte Carlos Baldrich, Manuel Simón i Amadeo Busch. En el CD núm. 14 d'Història de Catalunya (editat per La Vanguardia - Generalitat de Catalunya), en la dissertació del vídeo diu textualment "fou assassinat per pistolers de la patronal". Per més informació sobre Salvador Seguí: Manuel Cruells. Salvador Seguí, El Noi del Sucre. Editorial Ariel, S.A. Barcelona, 1974. Josep M. Huertas. Salvador Seguí: el Noi del Sucre. Materials per a una biografia. Editorial Laia. Barcelona, 1974. Escrits de Salvador Seguí. A cura d’Isidre Molas. Edicions 62 s/a. Barcelona, 1975. Articulos madrileños de Salvador Seguí (Edición de Antonio Elorza). Editorial Cuadernos para el diálogo, S.A. Madrid, 1976. Pere Foix. Apòstols i mercaders. Editorial Nova Terra, Barcelona, 1976. I no cal dir que també a Diccionari biogràfic del moviment obrer als Països Catalans. Coordinat per María Teresa Martínez de Sas i Pelai Pagès i Blanch. Edicions Universitat de Barcelona. Publicacions de l’Abadia de Montserrat, 2000. Miguel Iñíguez. Esbozo de una Enciclopedia histórica del anarquismo español. Edició de la Fundación de Estudios Libertarios Anselmo Lorenzo. Madrid, 2001.
    Can access one of the indexes at this site at http://www.veuobrera.org/00fine-x/ http://www.translendium.com/ http://www.veuobrera.org/00fine-x/segui-sa.htm
    http://www.veuobrera.org/00fine-x/

    -- RAW MATERIAL: David Antona Domínguez

    iN EARLY YEARS OF THE rEPUBLIC (touring the Canaries, Alicante, the Basque Country, Rioja & Castile .. together with Ascaso, Antona, Magriñá, Inestal, SANZ, Ricardo Canals (Valencia) 1898, & others) http://www.sbhac.net/Republica/Personajes/Politicos/Politicos1.htm David Antona. Bricklayer of profession & leader cenetista, of whose organization he was Secretary General of the National Committee, that when exploding the civil war was prisoner in the jail Model of Madrid by its intervention in numerous social conflicts of the time, & that the 20 of 1936 July was set free by order of the minister of the Interior, general Sebastián Pozas, getting up itself immediately afterwards to the republican military services. Destacadísima had one performance in the suppression of the military rise in Alcala de Henares & Guadalajara.


    El gran pecado de la delegación española que asistió en 1937 al congreso de la A. I. T. (formada por José Xena, David Antona, Horacio M. Prieto y el secretario general Mariano R. Vázquez) // Spanish delegation that attended in 1937 the congress of A.I.T. (formed by Jose Xena, David Antona, Horacio M. Dark & the Secretary General Mariano R. Vázquez)

    David Antona Domínguez (or Rodríguez) on 18 July of 1936 it|he|she was imprisoned & its|his|her|their colleagues|partners of the CNT took out it|him of the prison. It|He|She occupied the charge|post as a provisional secretary of July in September. The Committee lived in Madrid. * [[1936]] - [[Horacio Martínez Prieto]], [[CNT]] Comitè secretari, dimití (o el van fer dimitir), Madrid. secretario de su Comité Nacional
    See David Antona, El Río en la sangre. (Madrid : Queimada Ediciones, 1982) 224 p. Rosa Dubovsky


    Born in Russia & persecuted by the czarist regime, flees with her husband Adolph towards Turkey. Adolph gets ready in Army while he is in the Service Military, & there gives an arsenal of arms to the revolutionaries. Before they marry privily: Rosa part to France, & its husband to Buenos Aires.

    In 1907 they are reunited in Rosario, when it works in the Railroads & she works like hatbox.

    In the city of Santa Fe, Adolph militates in the field anarchist-syndicalism, & Rose concurs to the meetings of women anarchists. It founds a bibilioteca, exclusively for women, call Emma Goldman. After the blow of ´30, the marriage & its six children must escape to Buenos Aires, in spite of the little security. In 1936 Adolph dies. He begins to unite like employee of esterilla & tapestry, participates in the FORA & the Federation Libertaria Argentina, until 1972, the year of her death.


    ///

    Nacida en Rusia y perseguida por el régimen zarista, huye junto a su marido Adolfo hacia Turquía. Adolfo se alista en Ejército mientras hace el Servicio Militar, y allí entrega un arsenal de armas a los revolucionarios. Antes se casan en secreto: Rosa parte a Francia, y su esposo a Buenos Aires. En 1907 se reencuentran en Rosario, cuando el trabaja en los Ferrocarriles y ella trabaja como sombrerera.

    En la ciudad de Santa Fe, Adolfo milita en el campo anarco - sindicalista, y Rosa concurre a las reuniones de mujeres anarquistas. Funda una bibilioteca, exclusivamente para mujeres, llamada Emma Goldman.

    Después del golpe del ´30, el matrimonio y sus seis hijos deben escapar a Buenos Aires, a pesar de la poca seguridad. En 1936 muere Adolfo. Comienza a trabar como empleada de la esterilla y tapicería, participa en la FORA y en la Federación Libertaria Argentina, hasta 1972, el año de su muerte. http://www.alasbarricadas.org/ateneovirtual/index.php/Rosa_Dubovsky
    http://www.alasbarricadas.org/ateneo/modules/wikimod/index.php?page=Dubovsky,%20Rosa

    ?
    1984 -- Politieagenten Zijn ook Mensen (Police Officers are People Too)

    Photography & lithography. Height: 48.3 cm Width: 33 cm. The Netherlands, c1970.

    Published by the Society for the Rescue of Society, this poster shows a young protester being beaten by policemen. The title ironically reads "Police Officers are People Too." The photograph was believed to have been taken during a violent confrontation between an anarchist group known as the Provos & police in March of 1966. Little is known about the group who produced this poster, however much is understood about anarchism in Holland. Dutch anarchists have been credited with developing one of the most original & innovative anarchist movements in Europe. They have had a significant impact on the political landscape, including the establishment of the Green movement in Holland.

    http://www.ipl.org/exhibit/Labadie/europe.html
    http://pdxnorml.org/HT_provos_0190.html

    ?
    1993 -- Don't Vote

    Mimeograph. Height: 35.6 cm Width: 21.6 cm. USA, 1964.

    This poster was produced in 1964 by the New York Committe, Anti-Vote Campaign. The Anti-Vote Campaign was an apolitical group made up of individuals, anarchists, radicals, & libertarians. The message is simple, but poignant: "direct action not politics!" Clearly, the intent of the declaration is to call on individuals to seek out "direct actionist" alternatives to voting in the 1964 elections. The anti-vote movement believed that the political rights & liberties which people enjoy today are the result of individuals' strengths & actions -- not of their governments, independent candidates, or party platforms. http://www.ipl.org/exhibit/Labadie/north_america.html


    ?
    1999 -- http://freespeechseattle.org/
    http://freespeechseattle.org/
    http://freespeechseattle.org/posters/

    2000 -- Beating the ol dog ... http://RECOLLECTIONbooks.com/Jim/jimcard.html


    2000 -- new image links: Ali image, http://coloredreflections.com/decades/graphics/People/MAli.jpg malatesta http://syntac.net/hoax/Images/malatesta.jpg peltier http://www.igc.org/igc/pn/hg/gifs/lpimage-s.jpg



    2001 -- Robert Cantwell, author of The land of Plenty.




  • ?
    2001 --



    2001 -- Tuesday, October 12, 2004 - 07:32 PM, (1075 Reads)

    São cada vez mais numerosas as notícias que chegam das idéias e práticas anarquistas pelo mundo, e no Brasil. Isto é sintoma de que o anarquismo vive, é difuso e cresce, mesmo timidamente e sem a força social que outrora possuia. E como o caminho se faz caminhando... Brasil: Anarquismo em movimento no Rio de Janeiro

    São cada vez mais numerosas as notícias que chegam das idéias e práticas anarquistas pelo mundo, e no Brasil. Isto é sintoma de que o anarquismo vive, é difuso e cresce, mesmo timidamente e sem a força social que outrora possuia. E como o caminho se faz caminhando... Os companheiros/as da Federação Anarquista do Rio de Janeiro (FARJ) deram mais um passo na construção infinita do anarquismo naquela cidade. Com a inauguração neste sábado, 18 de SETEMBRO / SEPTEMBER, do Centro de Cultura Social do Rio de Janeiro (RJ), com a presença de cerca de 60 pessoas. A seguir um relato deste evento e projetos por um dos animadores do CCS/RJ. Longa vida ao CCS/RJ!


    TEMPLATE FOR CONGRESSES
    Socialist red rose logoRio de Janeiro

    September 8-13, 1913 

      

    dingbat
    Segundo Congresso Operário Brasileiro - Centro Cosmopolita. Ao todo os trabalhadores anarquistas e anarco-sindicalistas realizaram 12 sessões, debateram 24 temas com a presença de 117 delegados de 8 estados, sendo dois federações estaduais, cinco federações locais, 52 sindicatos e quatro jornais libertários.

    [Source: Movimento Anarquista no Brasil]


    "Todos/as se reuniram em uma grande roda em nosso pátio e cada um dos projetos ou atividades em andamento foi apresentado. Muitos/as compas que estiveram presentes no Colóquio Internacional Libertário lá estiveram para conhecer a Biblioteca Social Fábio Luz, instância pública da FARJ, fundada em 18 de NOVEMBER novembro de 2001, cujo acervo é dedicado principalmente ao anarquismo, suas idéias, lutas e história. A BSFL, dentro do espírito dos antigos ateneus libertários ou das bibliotecas sindicais, conta também com obras cuja temática abrange desde filosofia, história e educação, até literatura brasileira e estrangeira, poesia etc.

    A seguir, foi apresentado o principal projeto mantido pelo CCS/RJ, que é o da fabricação e venda de bolinhos por jovens estudantes entre 14 e 18 anos, moradores das comunidades carentes dos arredores, principalmente do Morro dos Macacos.

    Os/as próprios/as jovens apresentaram o projeto, falando da experiência de trabalhar de forma autogestionária, onde todas as decisões são tomadas por eles/as próprios/as. O CCS/RJ proporciona a eles/as os meios de produção (equipamentos, fornos, batedeiras, eletricidade, gás etc. E todo o dinheiro arrecadado com a venda dos bolinhos é dividida igualmente entre estes/as.

    O CCS/RJ também cedeu espaço para o Grupo Luz do Sol desenvolver um trabalho de reforço escolar com crianças das comunidades vizinhas, bem como uma oficina de reaproveitamento de produtos recicláveis (inicialmente pet e embalagens tetrapack), desenvolvida pelo nosso companheiro Berimbau.

    No próximo domingo, dia 26, haverá no pátio do CCS/RJ uma exposição dos objetos feitos com os materiais recicláveis. Adicionalmente, há no CCS/RJ aulas de Yoga e um curso de mosáicos.

    Em breve, estará sendo organziado no CCS/RJ um núcleo de advogados que proporcionará apoio jurídico as pessoas das comunidades carentes do bairro de Vila Isabel, e que levará o nome do grande escritor anarquista Lima Barreto.

    Após serem apresentadas as atividades internas do CCS, foram expostas as atividades externas que o CCS/RJ apoia, como as ocupações urbanas Nova Conquista, em Jacarepaguá, e Chiquinha Gonzaga, no Centro.

    O ato foi concluído com a falação dos companheiros Felipe Tombolini, do Instituto de Estudos Anarquistas de Santiago (Chile) e Frank Mintz, da CNT-Vignoles (França). Depois houve uma confraternização entre todos/as os/as presentes."

    // The notice that arrive of the ideas & practical anarchists for the world, & in Brazil are each time more numerous. That is symptom of that the anarquismo lives, is diffuse & grows, exactly timidamente & without the social force that long ago it possessed. E as the way if makes walking… Brazil: Anarquismo in movement in Rio De Janeiro

    The notice are each time more numerous that arrive of the practical ideas & anarchists for the world, & in Brazil. That is symptom of that the anarquismo it lives, he is diffuse & it grows, exactly timidamente & without the social force that long ago it possessed. E as the way if makes walking…

    Companheiros/as of the Anarchic Federacy of Rio De Janeiro (FARJ) they had given plus a step in infinite construction of the anarquismo in that city. With the inauguration in this Saturday, 18 of September, the Center of Social Culture of Rio De Janeiro (RIO DE JANEIRO), with the presence of about 60 people. To follow a story of this event & projects for one of the entertainers of the CCS/RJ. Long life to the CCS/RJ!

    “Todos/as if had congregated in a great wheel in our patio & each one of projects or activities in progress were presented. Muitos/as compas that they had been gifts in the Libertarian International Colóquio had been there to know the Library Fábio Luz, public instance of the FARJ Social, established in 18 of November of 2001, whose quantity is dedicated mainly to the anarquismo, its ideas, fights & history. The BSFL, inside of the spirit of the old libertarian ateneus or the syndical libraries, it counts also with workmanships whose thematic it encloses since philosophy, history e education, until Brazilian & foreign literature, poetry etc. To follow, the main project kept for the CCS/RJ was presented, that is of the manufacture & venda of cookies for young students between 14 & 18 years, inhabitants of the devoid communities of the outskirts, mainly of Mount of the Monkeys. Os/as próprios/as young had presented the project, speaking of the experience to work of autogestionária form, where all the decisions are taken for eles/as próprios/as. The CCS/RJ provides eles/as the ways of production (equipment, ovens, doughs mixer, electricity, gas etc. & all the money collected with venda of cookies is divided equally between estes/as. The CCS/RJ also yielded space for the Group Light of the Sun to develop one work of pertaining to school reinforcement with children of the neighboring communities, well as a workshop of reaproveitamento of products you recycle (initially pet & packings tetrapack), developed for ours Berimbau friend. In the next sunday, day 26, will have in the patio of the CCS/RJ an exposition of objects made with the materials you recycle. Additionally, it has in the CCS/RJ lessons of Yoga & a course of mosáicos. Soon, he will be being organziado in the CCS/RJ a nucleus of lawyers who it will provide to legal support the people of the devoid communities of quarter of Vila Isabel, & that it will take the name of the great anarchist writer (Afonso Henriques de Lima Barreto -- Encyclopædia Britannica ) Lima Barreto. After to be presented the internal activities of the CCS, they had been displayed external activities that the CCS/RJ supports, as the urban occupations New Conquest, in Jacarepaguá, & Chiquinha Gonzaga, in the Center. The act was concluded with the falação of the friends Felipe Tombolini, of the Institute of Anarchist Studies of Santiago (Chile) & Frank Mintz, of CNT-Vignoles (France). Later it had a confraternização between todos/as os/as gifts. “ http://www.infoshop.org/pt/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=1&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0


    2002 -- Agnes Inglis: Anarchist Librarian

    by Julie Herrada & Tom Hyry Published in the Progressive Librarian

    Agnes Inglis never planned on a career as a librarian. At the age of 52 in 1924, & following a period of intense work on behalf of radical immigrants facing persecution & deportation after World War I, Inglis visited the University of Michigan library to consult the collection of books, journals, papers, clippings, & ephemera donated by her friend Joseph Labadie in 1911. "Jo" Labadie(1) was a labor leader, social reformer & individualist anarchist who accumulated a large number of materials documenting the multitude of events & movements he had participated in over a forty-year career. Inglis found Labadie's original collection in the same condition in which it had been donated: "in fine shape…though still unbound." (Inglis 1924) She decided to spend a short period of time volunteering in the library unpacking & sorting materials. That short time turned into 28 years of distinguished & mostly unpaid service, during which she not only organized the large collection, but increased it by an estimated twenty times its original size, & raised it to the status it enjoys today among libraries documenting the history and philosophy of anarchism & other radical social & political movements. Inglis's life as an anarchist & a librarian provides an excellent case of the intersection between political ideals & librarianship.

    Born the youngest child of a well-to-do Detroit family in 1872, Agnes spent most of her first three decades in a sheltered, conservative, religious family home. Her father, a noted physician, died when she was four years old. Other than a year at an exclusive girls' academy in Massachusetts, Inglis spent her youth nursing a sister ill with cancer, & subsequently her mother who died before Agnes turned thirty. With no more family obligations & a substantial income, Agnes left home to travel & attend the University of Michigan where she studied history & literature.

    Inglis left school before attaining a degree & spent several years as a social worker at Chicago's Hull House, the Franklin Street Settlement House in Detroit, & the Ann Arbor YWCA. While working in these settings, she gained intimate knowledge of the unfair working & living conditions suffered by working class immigrant women & men. She also grew skeptical of the effectiveness of liberal policies & programs designed to transform the lives of working people & subsequently began to question the social, economic, & political conditions in the United States. At the same time, Inglis continued her abbreviated education informally. She read widely & was especially attracted to & persuaded by revolutionary writers. She attended many lectures in Ann Arbor & Detroit given by a variety of social critics, many of them anarchists. She met Emma Goldman in 1915 & became friends with the famous anarchist through whom she also met Alexander Berkman, Goldman's longtime comrade & lover. Inglis organized anarchist lectures in southeastern Michigan, began associations & friendships with many local radicals, & joined the Detroit chapter of the Industrial Workers of the World. In addition to her activism, Inglis used her financial means to generously support radical efforts ranging from strike funds to bail money for those imprisoned for expressing unpopular political viewpoints. With the onset of the United States involvement in World War I, Inglis stepped up her radical activities by participating frequently in demonstrations protesting conscription & the war. When the government cracked down on radicals demonstrating against the war in what became known as the first Red Scare, Inglis found her resources to be even more in demand. Along with tireless efforts in support of those facing deportation, she also posted bail for numerous individuals and contributed heavily to their defense funds. Her longtime support of radical causes eventually led her family to cut off her unlimited access to funds & gave her only a modest income on which to live. When the turmoil following the Red Scare died down, Inglis began her career in the Labadie Collection. As curator, Agnes developed idiosyncratic organizational techniques that nonetheless provided a useful structure to the collection. She began by dividing assorted materials into broad subject categories that resulted in a vertical file system still in use today. She had many journals bound, including Mother Earth, Regeneration , & Appeal to Reason , & compiled clippings & other ephemera into scrapbooks dealing with subjects on which there existed abundant documentation, such as Emma Goldman, Haymarket, the I.W.W., the Tom Mooney case, & Sacco & Vanzetti. In addition, she constructed a detailed card catalog (also still in use) that held item level cataloging on most materials in the collection as well as information lists of individuals and groups that functioned as a low level name authority file. Though her death left some mysteries about the arrangement of the materials in the collection, her organizational efforts restored contextual information to the materials & made them far more usable by researchers. There is no evidence that she either had or sought the assistance of trained librarians within the library system, consequently all this work was done on her own. Inglis succeeded in greatly increasing & broadening the holdings of the Labadie Collection. After a few years of organizing it, Agnes & Jo sent a letter to 400 radicals asking them to contribute their materials documenting events & people they knew. Though the letter received only a limited response, Inglis used it as a starting point to aggressively seek out individuals to donate materials. Among the most important collections she added were papers relating to Voltairine de Cleyre, a Michigan-born anarchist & friend of Emma Goldman's, & socialist writer John Francis Bray. She used her extensive connections & correspondence with radicals of the period such as Goldman, Roger Baldwin, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, & Ralph Chaplin, among many others, to persuade them to contribute relevant materials. Agnes also assisted many individuals in their research & publications including helping Goldman and Chaplin with their autobiographies, Henry David with the seminal The Haymarket Tragedy , and James J. Martin with Men Against the State . Inglis's career has historical significance for librarians concerned with issues of social justice for a number of reasons. Her story is inspiring from a political standpoint because once her political ideals were formed, she never betrayed them & she saw them as central to her work as a librarian. Her motivations came explicitly from her devotion to the ideals of the philosophy and history of anarchists & other leftist radicals with whom she labored for a better & more just world. Her political commitments often worked to the advantage of the collection, seen most explicitly in the use of her connections to acquire records from her comrades. Even recently, the Labadie Collection received a valuable set of papers from a woman who was still grateful to Agnes for bailing her father out of jail all the way back in 1917.

    She also put use of the collection as a top priority, even to the extreme of lending materials from the collection. When one of her borrowers damaged or did not return an item, her genteel and generous nature would never allow her to accuse them. She was pleased enough that people were interested in the materials. One note she wrote describing her loan of a book to an Italian anarchist who lived in the Twentieth Ward in Detroit in 1934 says "the Twentieth Ward sure is hard on a rare book!"

    Finally, her knowledge of the individuals & events of that history enabled her to effectively collect, arrange, describe, & provide access to the materials in the collection. Inglis once wrote to Emma Goldman, "It's no joke to take all that mass of material & fix it up so students can really use it. It is not a work everyone can do. One has to know the material. People don't appreciate that." (Inglis 1925) Agnes devoted the final third of her life to the Labadie Collection, until her death in 1952. Generations of scholars who have used the collection have appreciated the knowledge, skill & dedication Agnes Inglis brought to the cause of documenting the history of radical political movements in the United States & her contribution to that history is immeasurable.

    WORKS CITED Inglis, Agnes (1924) Letter to http://recollectionbooks.com/bleed/Encyclopedia/LabadieJoseph.htm, February 11th , Joseph Labadie Papers, Labadie Collection, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Inglis, Agnes (1925) Letter to Emma Goldman, March 19th , Emma Goldman Papers, Labadie Collection,University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

    1. For more information on the life of Labadie, see Carlotta Anderson's excellent new biography, All American Anarchist: Joseph A. Labadie & the Labor Movement (Detroit: Wayne State University Press) 1998. http://www.spunk.org/agnes.html


    2002 -- Dernière mise à jour : 22 mai 2002 La troisième semaine d'août est achevée ! Nouvelles biographies: , José Peirats, Michele Angiolillo, Jesús Guillen, Juan Portalés, Monier (Simentoff).

    Nouveaux événements: Exécution d'Angiolillo, exclusion des anars au Congrès Socialiste de Londres.

    Rectifications d'erreurs ou compléments d'informations: Teresa Mañe (Soledad Gustavo), congrès de l'U.A.C. http://ytak.club.fr/aout3.html#20
    http://ateneovirtual.alasbarricadas.org/historia/index.php?page=Guerrillas+Libertarias



    2003 --
    CRONOLOGIA DO ANARQUISMO
    1563 Morre Etienne de la Boétie, autor do Discurso sobre a Servidão Voluntária, um livro clássico do pensamento libertário, em que analisa o conformismo do povo e aponta a desobediência como um instrumento de mudança social e de luta contra os poderosos.
    1789 Revolução Francesa, um momento decisivo de derrocada da velha ordem feudal e clerical na Europa. Na Revolução participaram grupos populares radicais que defendiam posições próximas do pensamento libertário. A Revolução Francesa mereceu estudos de anarquistas como Pytor Kropotkin Piotr Kropotkin e Daniel Guerin e foi vista pelos movimentos libertários como precursora das revoluções sociais do século XIX e XX.
    1792 Mary Wollstonecraft, companheira de William Godwin , precursora libertária e feminista, publica Reividicação dos Direitos da Mulher.
    1793 William Godwin,  pensador inglês, precursor do anarquismo, publica o livro Investigação Acerca da Justiça Política.
    1837 Morre o socialista utópico Charles Fourrier.
    1840 Pierre Joseph Proudhon emprega pela primeira vez, no seu livro O Que é a Propriedade?, a palavra anarquia no sentido de sociedade autogovernada. O engenheiro francês Louis Léger Vauthier vai trabalhar no Brasil, Recife, onde passa a divulgar as idéias de Fourier, influenciando intelectuais como Antonio Pedro Figueiredo. 
    1841 Inicia-se a tentativa de criar um falanstério no Brasil na região do Saí (São Francisco - Estado de Santa Catarina) por um grupo de franceses encabeçados pelo médico fourierista Benoit Jules Mure.
    1842 Marx e Bakúnin começam a colaborar na revista Anais Alemães de Arnolde Ruge. Neste ano Marx elogia os "trabalhos penetrantes de Proudhon".
    1844 Marx conhece Proudhon, então já um famoso pensador socialista, em Paris. Nesse mesmo ano morre em França a revolucionária socialista, de origem peruana, Flora Tristán, avó do pintor Paul Gauguin.
    1845 Benoit Jules Mure edita, no Rio de Janeiro, após se ter frustrado o falanstério do Saí, um dos primeiros jornais socialistas, O Socialista da Província do Rio de Janeiro. Nesse mesmo ano o pensador anarquista individualista Max Stirner, escreve O Único e a sua Propriedade. Nos Estados Unidos o libertário Josiah Barren funda a colônia Utopia.
    1846 Proudhon escreve a Filosofia da Miséria. Marx e Proudhon trocam correspondência. Na última carta o anarquista francês, depois de criticar todo o dogmatismo, adverte Marx: "não nos tornemos os chefes de uma nova intolerância". é o sinal da irreconciliação entre os dois pensadores.
    1847 Marx publica A Miséria da Filosofia tentando refutar a obra de Proudhon. Constituem-se na Colômbia as sociedades democráticas, influenciadas pelo pensamento de Proudhon.
    1848 Kar Marx e Friederich Engels publicam o Manifesto Comunista. No Brasil dá-se a Revolução Praieira, no Recife, onde participam intelectuais influenciados pelo socialismo utópico. Agitações revolucionárias em vários países da Europa, a mais importante das quais foi a chamada Revolução de 1848 em França.
    1849 David Thoreau publica o clássico libertário americano Desobediência Civil. Bakúnin é preso, após ter participado em várias rebeliões, só vindo a escapar em 1861 da Sibéria.
    1850 José Maria Chávez tenta criar em Aguascalientes, no México, um falanstério. No Chile, em março, foi criada a "Sociedad de la Igualdad", por Ambrosio Larracheda, Manuel Lúcares, Cecilio Cerda e Rudecindo Rojas, uma das primeiras associações operárias e socialistas.  
    1852 Primeira viagem aos Estados Unidos de Victor Considérant, discípulo de Fourier, para criar um falanstério.
    1855 José Inácio Abreu Lima, o brasileiro general de Bolivar, publica o livro O Socialismo.
    1856 Morre precocemente Max Stirner.
    1861 O emigrante grego Plotino Rhodakanaty publica no México a Cartilha Socialista e edita o jornal El Falanstério. Bakúnin foge para o ocidente, indo viver na Inglaterra e posteriormente na Suiça.
    1862 Operários franceses e ingleses reunem-se em Londres durante a Exposição Internacional e decidem constituir uma organização internacional, que viria a ser fundada oficialmente em 1864, a AIT.
    1863 Proudhon publica um de seus principais livros O Príncipio Federativo.
    1864 é criada em Londres a Associação Internacional dos Trabalhadores (AIT) e Bakúnin funda Aliança Internacional da Democracia Socialista.
    1865 Morre Proudhon, considerado o primeiro anarquista moderno. Conferência de Londres da AIT. Em Habana é fundado o jornal La Aurora, de idéias proudhonianas. No relatório sobre a Conferência de Londres da AIT Charles Limousin e Fribourg escreveram que "se tomaram medidas para estabelecer correspondência com Rio de Janeiro e com as colônias francesas de Guadalupe e Martinica".
    1866 No Chile, o socialista utópico Ramón Picarte tenta criar um falanstério em Chillán. 
    1867 Marx publica o primeiro volume do Capital. Congresso de Lausanne da AIT.
    1868 Bakúnin ingressa na AIT e os núcleos de partidários da Aliança Socialista passam a ser seções da Primeira Internacional. As idéias internacionalistas chegam a Portugal e Espanha através do companheiro de Bakúnin, o italiano Giuseppe Fanelli. O socialista espanhol partidário de Proudhon, Pi y Margall publica o livro Las Nacionalidades. Congresso de Bruxelas da AIT. Os socialistas proudhonianos mexicanos criam Gran Circulo de Obreros.
    1869 é fundada a União Cooperativa Inglesa. Congresso de Basileia da AIT.
    1870 é formado o Gran Círculo de Obreros de México, de orientação proudoniana. Em Barcelona é criada a Federação Regional Espanhola, aderente à AIT. Morre o pensador russo Aleksandr Herzen, um federalista amigo de Bakúnin e um dos mais influentes intelectuais russos do século XIX.
    1871 Os trabalhadores de Paris declaram a Comuna, mas as tropas do governo invadem Paris em maio desencadeando um massacre. Bakúnin publica um dos seus principais livros Deus e Estado. Os internacionalistas espanhóis Anselmo Lorenzo, Morago e Mora refugiam-se em Lisboa e fazem contatos para criar uma seção portuguesa da AIT.  O poeta português Antero de Quental,  partidário da AIT, publica o folheto O Que é a Internacional? Conferência da AIT em Londres.
    1872 O Congresso de Haia da AIT, expulsa os anarquistas por proposta de Marx e transfere a sede a internacional para Nova York. Este foi o último congresso da AIT, a partir daí dissolveu-se a Primeira Internacional. Os anti-autoritários reúnem-se em Saint Imier na tentativa de preservar a internacional. Em Portugal , em fevereeiro, sai o jornal O Pensamento Social ligado aos internacionalistas. No México são editados os jornais El Obrero Internacional e La Comuna.
    1873 O médico Eduardo Maia, membro da seção portuguesa da AIT e um dos primeiros anarquistas do país, publica  A Internacional, sua História, sua Organização e seus Fins.
    1874 é publicada em Portugal a tradução Do Princípio da Federação de Proudhon. O anarquista francês era lido há vários anos em francês pelos intelectuais e trabalhadores socialistas.
    1875 Constitui-se no Uruguai a Federación Regional de la República Oriental del Uruguay, mais tarde transformada em Federación Obrera Regional Uruguaya. Reúne-se no México o Congreso General Obrero.
    1876 Morre  na Suiça o agitador e pensador anarquista russo Mikhail Bakúnin. No México as idéias socialistas são discutidas no Primeiro Congresso Operário. A ala marxista da AIT declara oficialmente, em Filadélfia, o fim da Primeira Internacional. é publicado no México o livro de Prouhdon Idea General de la Revolución en el Siglo XIX. Desencadeiam-se várias greves operárias com participação de trabalhadores anarquistas.
    1877 Sublevações camponesas, de inspiração socialista e libertária, no México, nos Planes de la Barranca e Sierra Gorda. Levante de Benevento, um grupo de anarquistas, entre os quais Carlo Cafiero e Errico Malatesta precorrem aldeias do sul de Itália, queimam os arquivos, distribuem armas e apelam aos camponeses para declarar o comunismo libertário.
    1878 Quatro anarquistas são enforcados em Chicago em conseqüência das manifestações pelas 8 horas de trabalho. Este acontecimento iria passar a marcar as comemorações do 1. de maio. No México é fundado o primeiro Partido Comunista Mexicano, de idéias anarquistas. Em Montevideu começa a publicar-se o jornal El Internacional.
    1879 Aparecem na Rússia vários grupos revolucionários de tendência populista e anarquista, que se dedicam a desencadear a ação direta contra o czarismo. Começa a publicar-se na Suiça o jornal anarquista Le Revolté, sob direção de Kropótkin. Publica-se em Cuba o jornal anarquista El Obrero.
    1880 Engels publica Socialismo Utópico e Socialismo Científico. Chega aos Estados Unidos o militante anarquista alemão Johann Most.
    1882 Anarquistas celebram em Montevideo o aniversário da Comuna de Paris.
    1883 é criada na Suiça a Emancipação do Trabalho, primeira organização marxista russa. Morre Karl Marx. é fundado em Buenos Aires o Circulo Comunista Anarquista.
    1884 Reclus visita a Colômbia para pesquisar para a sua Nova Geografia Universal, tendo proposto ao governo a criação de uma comunidade agrícola, a que chamou República Idílica, em Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta.
    1885 Malatesta chega à Aregentina onde residirá por cinco anos.
    1886 Começa a publicar-se em Londres o jornal Freedom, por um grupo anarquista reunido em torno de Kropótkin. Reúne-se em Habana o Congreso Obrero Local. Em Buenos Aires, o militante anarquista Mattei edita El Socialista.
    1887 é publicado o primeiro livro de Krópotkin em Portugal, A Anarchia na Evolução Socialista. Formam-se os grupos anarco-comunistas do Porto e de Lisboa. Trabalhadores anarquistas fundam, em Buenos Aires, o Circulo Socialista Internacional. Em Habana começa a se publicar o jornal anarquista El Productor.
    1888 é fundada em França a organização Bolsas do Trabalho, de tendência libertária. Kropótkin publica um dos seus mais famosos, e traduzidos, livros, A Conquista do Pão.
    1889 é fundada em Paris a Segunda Internacional. Em Santos, Silvério Fontes  cria o Centro Socialista, um dos primeiros grupos dedicados à divulgação das idéias socialistas no Brasil.
    1890 Generalizam-se as manifestações e comemorações do Primeiro de Maio na Europa. Embarcam para o Brasil o primeiro grupo de anarquistas que vai fundar a Colônia Cecília no Paraná. Oscar Wilde edita A Alma do Homem sob o Socialismo, um livro de inspiração libertária. No Chile greve promovida por trabalhadores anarquistas termina com uma violenta repressão. Em Buenos Aires começa a se publicar um dos primeiros jornais anarquistas El Perseguido. Em Nova York, o militante anarquista Pedro Esteve, começa a publicar El Despertar um dos mais duradouros jornais anarquistas, em língua castelhana, dos Estados Unidos. 
    1891 é fundada na Aregentina a Federación Obrera Argentina (FOA). Que depois de um período de estagnação volta a ser reorganizada em 1901, sob uma linha anarco-sindicalista.
    1892 é publicado, por emigrantes italianos, Gli Schiavi Bianchi, um dos primeiros jornais anarquistas brasileiros. Ravachol, o mais famoso dos anarquistas partidário da ação direta, é guilhotinado em França. Morre Carlos Cafiero um dos militantes  socialistas que contribuiu para o desenvolvimento do anarquismo em Itália. No Chile é criado o primeiro centro de estudos sociais anarquista.
    1893 Giovanni Rossi, médico veterinário e anarquista idealizador da Colônia Cecília publica na Itália , Cecilia, Uma Comunidade Anarquista Experimental. é criada na Holanda a National Arbeids Sekretariat (NAS), sindicalista revolucionária, onde teve um papel importante o anarquista Christian Cornelissen. Chega a Cuba o tipógrafo catalão Pedro Esteve, que seria um dos principais militantes anarquistas do país. Nesse mesmo ano os trabalhadores cubanos fundam a Sociedad General de Trabajadores. Levantamento de trabalhadores em Bogotá, com influência anarquista. No Chile é publicado El Oprimido, considerado o primeiro jornal anarquista do país.
    1895 é fundada a Confederação Geral do Trabalho (CGT) francesa que viria a inspirar o anarco-sindicalismo em todo o mundo. A Carta de Amiens, aprovada em 1906, é o documento que define as linhas do sindicalismo revolucionário libertário.
    1896 No Congresso de Londres os anarquistas são expulsos da Internacional Socialista. Em Portugal é publicado o importante estudo de Silva Mendes, O Socialismo Libertário ou Anarquismo. Morre William Morris importante militante socialista inglês. Reúne-se em Lima o Primero Congreso Obrero. No Chile é criado o Centro Social Obrero reunindo os principais militantes anarquistas que publicam também o jornal El Grito del Pueblo.
    1897 é fundado em Buenos Aires La Protesta Humana, o mais importante jornal anarquista latino-americano.
    1898 Realiza-se no Brasil, no Rio Grande Sul, o primeiro congresso que reúne organizações operárias a nível estadual. Chega a Buenos Aires, o advogado italiano e intelectual anarquista Pietro Gori.
    1899 Na Colômbia Jacinto Albarracín, anarquista indígena, perseguido funda na floresta uma comuna libertária.
    1900 é publicado no Rio de Janeiro o livro Estados Unidos do Brasil, o capítulo da Geografia Universal de Elisée Reclus, referente ao Brasil. O anarquista mexicano Ricardo Flores Magón funda o jornal La Regeneración.
    1901 Morre Fernand Pelloutier operário e anarquista francês criador das Bolsas de Trabalho e idealizador do sindicalismo revolucionário, que influenciou o anarco-sindiclaismo à escala mundial. é fundada na Argentina a Federación Obrera Argentina (FOA) e os trabalhadores de Rosário declaram greve geral. Chega a São Paulo o advogado e militante anarquista Neno Vasco.
    1902 é editado o livro Apoio Mútuo de Kropótkin, uma crítica do darwinismo social e a defesa do princípio da cooperação como fundamento da evolução das sociedades. A FOA declara greve geral na Argentina. No Chile, a greve dos tipógrafos marca o desenvolvimento do sindicalismo revolucionário no país. Neste mesmo ano reuniu-se o Primeiro Congresso Social Operário, com participação de sociedades operárias, cooperativas e centros de cultura social.
    1903 O escritor e militante anarquista Fábio Luz publica o primeiro romance brasileiro de inspiração libertária, O Ideólogo. Foma-se na Argentina a Unión General de Trabajadores (UGT), reformista, mas onde virá a surgir mais tarde uma tendência próxima do sindicalismo revolucionário. No Chile foi criada na capital uma comunidade anarco-comunista, tendo sido criado, pouco depois, no interior uma comunidade influenciada pelas idéias de Tolstoi. Em Valparaíso, em abril, os trabalhadores portuários influenciados pelo sindicalismo revolucionário desencadeiam uma greve, que acaba se generalizando, em maio, em fortes conflitos de rua na cidade, obrigando o governo a enviar tropas para a cidade. Calcula-se que morreram mais de cem trabalhadores e houve milhares de feridos e presos.
    1904 No Quarto Congresso Sindical Argentino é criada a Federação Operária Regional Argentina (FORA) a mais importante e combativa organização anarco-sindicalista da América Latina. Realiza-se em Amsterdã o Congresso Antimilitarista organizado pelo anarquista e pacifista Ferdinand Nieuwenhuis.
    1905 Desencadeia-se a revolução russa que derruba o czarismo autocrático, iniciando uma abertura liberal. Nos Estados Unidos foi criada a Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) a mais importante organização sindicalista revolucionário americana, que influenciou a criação de organizações semelhantes no Chile, Nova Zelândia e Austrália. Morre élisée Reclus destacado geógrafo e militante anarquista. é criada a Federación Obrera de la Regional Uruguaya (FORU) de linha anarco-sindicalista, herdeira da linha libertária dos internacionalistas do século XIX. Morre em França, Louise Michel, famosa militante anarquista que participou da Comuna de Paris. No Chile realiza-se a Primera Convención Nacional de las Mancomunales, considerado o primeiro congresso operário. 
    1906 Primeiro Congresso Operário Brasileiro, aprova uma linha de atuação anarco-sindicalista e cria a Confederação Operária Brasileira (COB). Greve de mineiros no México deixa centenas de mortos. O agitador anarquista colombiano Biófilo Panclasta chega a Buenos Aires. No Chile foi criada a Federación de Trabajadores de Chile (FTCH), considerada a primeira federação operária sindicalista revolucionária. 
    1907 Congresso Anarquista Internacional em Amsterdã de que participou o colombiano Biófilo Panclasta representando os trabalhadores argentinos. No Brasil desencadeiam-se lutas pelas 8 horas de trabalho. Congresso dos anarquistas alemães reúne-se clandestinamente.
    1908 Começa a se publicar, no Rio de Janeiro, A Voz do Trabalhador, órgão da Confederação Operária Brasileira, principal jornal anarco-sindicalista do Brasil. é fundada na Bolivia a Federación Obrera Local (FOL), que será recriada em 1926, após ter desaparecido por vários anos. é fundada pelo operário Hilário Marques a revista Sementeira, a mais importante publicação anarquista portuguesa. Morre em Paris o agitador anarquista individualista Albert Libertad. Revoltas camponesas no México com o apoio de anarquistas.
    1909 Semana Trágica de Barcelona. Greve revolucionária agita Barcelona, provocando uma repressão feroz. O educador anarquista Francisco Ferrer Guardia é fuzilado acusado de ser responsável pela agitação revolucionária, mesmo que na época dos acontecimentos estivesse em Londres. Manifestações de indignação por todo o mundo contra o governo espanhol. Começa, em Portugal, o Congresso Operário Nacional , que encerra em 1910.
    1910 Morre o famoso escritor russo e defensor de um cristianismo igualitário, com afinidades anarquistas, Liev Tólstoi, que influenciou grupos anarco-cristãos em vários países, principalmente na Holanda e Estados Unidos. Em Barcelona foi fundada a Confederação Nacional do Trabalho (CNT), anarco-sindicalista. Revolução Republicana em Portugal com participação de trabalhadores e militantes anarquistas. Revolução Mexicana, com participação de camponeses e intelectuais libertários influenciados pelas idéias do militante anarquista Ricardo Flores Magón. Os trabalhadores suecos criam a Sveriges Arbetares Central (SAC) de tendência sindicalista revolucionária.
    1911 Primeiro Congresso Anarquista português e fundação Federação Anarquista da Região Sul. São enforcados no Japão os anarquistas Denjiro Kotuku e sua companheira Yugetsu Sugo Kanno. Greve geral no Peru promovida pelos anarco-sindicalistas. São editados os livros de Rafael Barrett, anarquista espanhol que atuou no Paraguai, El Dolor Paraguayo e Cuentos Breves. O ativo militante e jornalista anarquista Neno Vasco parte para Portugal, onde continuará sua militância. Chega a Buenos Aires, José de Brito, que se tornará um ativo militante anarquista na Argentina e, posteriormente em Portugal. No Panamá começa a publicar-se El Unico, Publicação Individualista, um dos raros jornais anarquistas individualistas da América Latina.
    1912 Constitui-se em Portugal a Federação Anarquista da Região Norte. Tranbalhadores anarco-sindicalistas bolivianos criam a Federación Obrera Internacional (FOI). Morre Voltairine de Clayre, agitadora anarquista americana. é criada em Itália a União Sindical Italiana (USI), anarco-sindicalista. Morre em tiroteio com a polícia Jules Bonnot, ilegalista e anarquista francês. No Chile é editado o jornal La Batalla, um dos mais importantes periódicos anarquistas do país.
    1913 Segundo Congresso Operário Brasileiro mantém a linha sindicalista revolucionária. Em Portugal formam-se as Juventudes Sindicalistas. Em Lisboa edita-se o importante jornal anarquista Terra Livre, dirigido pelo luso-brasileiro Pinto Quartim. Criação da Unión Obrera de Colombia.
    1914 Começa a Primeira Guerra Mundial dividindo o movimento socialista (inclusive os anarquistas) sobre a posição a tomar. Começa a se publicar, no Rio de Janeiro, A Vida, a principal revista anarquista do começo do século. Reúne-se em São Paulo a Conferência Libertária. Semana Vermelha em Itália, onda de greves e agitações, desencadeada pela USI, paraliza o país.
    1915 Tentativa de formar uma confederação anarco-sindicalista no México, resulta infrutífera pela violenta repressão desencadeada no ano seguinte. Congresso Internacional da Paz, realiza-se no Rio de Janeiro, com representações de vários estados brasileiros e delegados da Argentina. Realiza-se em Ferrol (Espanha) o Congresso Mundial Contra a Guerra, com delegados de vários países. Realiza-se no Rio de Janeiro o Congresso Anarquista Sul-americano, reunindo delegados do Brasil, Argentina e Uruguai.
    1916 Morre James Guillaume o mais conhecido militante anarquista suiço, miliante da AIT e fundador da Federação do Jura, que seria o centro difusor do anarquismo do século XIX. Esta Federação recebeu e apoiou militantes anarquistas de todo o mundo. Realiza-se no México um Congreso Obrero Nacional que cria a Federación del Trabajo de la Región Mexicana, anarco-sindicalista. O revolucionário anarquista mexicano Ricardo Flores Magón é condenado, nos Estados Unidos, a 20 anos de prisão.
    1917 Explode a Revolução Soviética. O Partido Social Democrata Russo, de Lenin, desencadeia ações militares que lhe dão o poder. Inicia-se a publicação de A Plebe, o mais importante jornal anarquista brasileiro. No Chile é criada a IWW, organização sindicalista revolucionária.
    1918 Inicia-se no Rio de Janeiro a greve geral revolucionária que ficou conhecida por Insurreição Anarquista do Rio de Janeiro. Publica-se, no Porto, Portugal, A Comuna, um dos mais destacados títulos da imprensa anarquista. No Brasil os anarquistas criam os Comitês Populares contra a Carestia de Vida. Chega à Argentina Diego Abad Santillán um dos mais importantes militantes e intelectual anarquista do nosso século, autor de uma vasta obra que inclui livros sobre o anarquismo e sindicalismo na Argentina.  
    1919 O anarquista português Manuel Ribeiro funda a Federação Maximalista Portuguesa, a primeira organização a defender o leninismo no país e que viria a dar origem ao Partido Comunista. No mesmo ano no Brasil é fundado o chamado Partido Comunista do Rio de Janeiro, que mistura anarquismo e maximalismo. Em Portugal, em Coimbra, no Segundo Congresso Operário Nacional, foi fundada a Confederação Geral do Trabalho (CGT), anarco-sindicalista e inicia-se a publicação do jornal A Batalha, o mais importante jornal anarco-sindicalista português. Semana Trágica em Buenos Aires, greve geral violentamente reprimida, com centenas de mortos. é criada no Chile a IWW, central sindical de afinidade anarco-sindicalista. é morto após a derrota da Revolução Alemã, o pensador anarquista Gustav Landauer. é fundada a organização anarco-sindicalista alemã Freie Arbeiter Union (FAU). é criada em Moscou, a Internacional Comunista, conhecida por Terceira Internacional.
    1920 Realizam-se, em Portugal, inúmeras greves, incluindo duas greves gerais. Morre precocemente em Portugal, Neno Vasco, um dos mais importantes militantes anarquistas de Portugal e do Brasil. Realiza-se o Terceiro Congresso Operário Brasileiro. Kropótkin escreve várias cartas a Lenin criticando a evolução autoritária da Revolução Russa. é fundado em Milão o diário anarquista Umanità Nuova. No Chile começa a publicar-se Claridad, a mais importante revista ácrata. Neste último país, durante a vaga repressiva deste ano, morreu na prisão o poeta libertário Gómez Rojas. 
    1921 Morre na Rússia o pensador anarquista Piotr Krópotkin, depois de um longo exílio na Europa. O seu funeral foi a última grande manifestação livre dos anarquistas russos. Violenta repressão, na União Soviética, contra o soviete de Kronstadt e contra o movimento maknovista, abre caminho à violência autoritário do Partido Comunista. é criado em Moscou a Internacional Sindical Vermelha (PROFINTERN) tendo por objetivo ampliar a influência dos partidos comunistas sob o movimento operário. As tropas argentinas massacram os trabalhadores anarco-sindicalistas da Patagônia.
    1922 Morre o importante escritor Lima Barreto autor de livros como Triste Fim de Policarpo Quaresma, colaborador da imprensa operária e simpatizante anarquista. Terceiro Congresso Operário Nacional em Portugal reafirma o sindicalismo revolucionário. Fundação do Partido Comunista do Brasil, aderente à Terceira Internacional, entre os fundadores estão vários ex-anarquistas. Marcha sobre Roma dos fascistas italianos, leva Mussolini ao poder, desencadeando a repressão sobre o movimento operário e socialista. Em Salvador é fundada a Unión Obrera Salvadoreña, de tendência anarco-sindicalista e em Cuba a Federación Obrera de la Habana (FOH). Nos Estados Unidos morre, de forma suspeita, na prisão o anarquista mexicano Ricardo Flores Magón. No Chile é fundada uma nova organização anarco-sindicalista, Federación Obrera Regional de Chile (que desaparece em 1927) e vai coexistir com a IWW também sindicalista revolucionária.
    1923 é publicado um dos mais importantes livros anarquistas em língua portuguesa, A Concepção Anarquista de Sindicalismo, de Neno Vasco. Em Portugal greve geral de solidariedade com os mineiros. Realiza-se em Alenquer (Portugal) uma Conferência Anarquista que decide a criação da União Anarquista Portuguesa (UAP). No México é fundada a Alianza Local Mexicana Anarquista (ALMA). No Peru anarco-sindicalistas criam a Federación Regional de Obreros Indios. O anarquista Kurt Wilckens mata na Argentina o coronel Varela, que comandou o massacre da Patagônia.
    1924 Manifestações em vários países, incluindo Portugal e Brasil de solidariedade com os anarquistas Sacco e Vanzetti. Criação, em Bogotá, do Grupo Sindicalista Antorcha Libertária, no ano seguinte seria criada a Federación Obrera del Litoral Atlântico (FOLA), anarco-sindicalista. é fundado por anarco-sindicalistas, no Panamá, o Sindicato General de Trabajadores. O anarquista colombiano Biófilo Panclasta participa de lutas operárias em São Paulo o que leva à sua prisão de deportação para o campo de concentração da Clevelândia, de onde veio a fugir. Chega à Argentina o militante anarquista francês Pierre Piller (Gaston Leval). No Chile a adoção do Código Trabalhista e de uma política de integração dos sindicatos no Estado, dá um rude golpe no sindicalismo autônomo.
    1925 é fundada em Cuba a Confederación Nacional Obrera de Cuba, anarco-sindicalista. Realiza-se na Colômbia o Segundo Congresso Operário que decide criar a Confederación Obrera Nacional.
    1926 Golpe Militar em Portugal abre o caminho à ditadura fascista, visando responder ao crescimento das lutas operárias. Chega ao México o escritor e militante anarquista de origem polaca Ret Marut, que passou a assinar seus livros como Bruno Traven. Formação do primeiro grupo anarquista da Guatemala.
    1927 Em Valência foi fundada a Federação Anarquista Ibérica (FAI) reunindo as organizações anarquistas das várias nacionalidades da península ibérica. Junto com a CNT, seriam as organizações que tiveram o papel decisivo na Revolução Espanhola de 1936. São mortos nos Estados Unidos Nicola Sacco e Bartolomeu Vanzetti, trabalhadores anarquistas italianos, num processo judicial fraudulento, que provocou a indignação do movimento operário internacional. Greve na Colômbia marca o momento mais alto do sindicalismo revolucionário no país.
    1930 Golpe militar no Brasil prepara o caminho para a ditadura de Getúlio Vargas. Golpe militar do general Uriburu impõe uma ditadura a que seguirá uma outra de Perón, que destruirá o sindicalismo autônoma na Argentina.
    1931 é fundada no Chile a Federación General de Trabajadores (CGT) anarco-sindicalista, com uma estrutura semelhante à FORA argentina. Morre o anarquista francês Emile Pouget que, junto com Fernand Pelloutier, desenvolveu as idéias centrais do sindicalismo revolucionário. Greves em Cuba promovidas pelos anarco-sindicalistas duram vários meses.
    1932 Morre em Itália, sob liberdade vigiada, Errico Malatesta, o principal agitador e pensador anarquista italiano, que atuou em vários países, inclusive na Argentina.
    1933 Os nazistas chegam ao poder na Alemanha desencadeando uma onda de repressão sobre as organizações operárias e socialistas. Morre o poeta alemão John Henry Mackay, grande divulgador do pensamento de Stirner.  
    1934 A CGT portuguesa, anarco-sindicalista, desencadeia uma greve geral revolucionária em 18 de janeiro. A repressão que se seguiu, destruiu o sindicalismo revolucionário e institui o sindicalismo corporativista fascista. Começa-se a publicar em França por iniciativa de Sebastian Faure a Enciclopédia Anarquista. Diego Abad Santillán parte para Espanha onde teria um papel importante no contexto revolucionário.
    1935 Morre em Paris o anarquista ucraniano, Nestor Mackhno, que teve de se refugiar no ocidente após ser perseguido pelo governo russo. Morre, no Uruguai, o militante anarquista italiano Luigi Fabbri, companheiro de Malatesta que desenvolveu intensa atividade na Europa e no Uruguai. Os anarquistas cubanos participam da luta contra a ditadura de Batista. é fundada clandestinamente na Argentina a Federación Anarco-Comunista Argentina (FACA)
    1936 Como resposta ao golpe fascista do general Francisco Franco, os trabalhadores, sindicalistas e anarquistas assaltam os quartéis desencadeando um processo revolucionário libertário que teve de se confrontar com os fascistas de Franco, apoiados por Hitler, Mussoluni e Salazar e, internamente, com os estalinistas. O revolucionário Victor Serge, ex-anarquista, que se tornou militante do Partido Comunista da União Soviética, consegue exilar-se no ocidente, após um movimento internacional de solidariedade, vindo a denunciar os crimes do estalinismo. é morto a tiro em Madrid, em condições nunca esclarecidas, Buenaventura Durruti, o mais famoso revolucionário anarquista do nosso século.
    1937 Realizam-se vários atentados em Portugal contra objetivos ligados aos fascistas espanhóis e alguns militantes anarquistas e comunistas executam um atentado contra o ditador Salazar, que consegue escapar com vida. Militantes operários, incluindo anarquistas e comunistas são deportados para o campo de concentração do Tarrafal, em Cabo Verde. é implantada no Brasil a ditadura de Getúlio Vargas, adotando uma constituição de tipo fascista, passando a desencadear a sistemática repressão contra o movimento operário e particularmente sobre os anarquistas. é morto por estalinistas em Espanha o militante anarquista italiano Camilo Berneri. é criada em Portugal a Federação Anarquista da Região Portuguesa (FARP).
    1939 As tropas de Franco derrotam as forças anti-fascistas, seguindo-se uma violenta repressão e o exílio de centenas de milhares de operários e anarquistas, que se refugiam em França, vindo alguns mais tarde para a América Latina. Franco e Salazar estabelecem o Pacto Ibérico, fundamentalmente destinado a articular a repressão contra o movimento operário. Começa a Segunda Guerra Mundial desencadeando-se a expansão nazi-fascista. Morre em Monte Carlo, Benjamin Tucker um dos mais destacados pensadores libertários americanos.
    1940 Morre Emma Goldman militante anarquista de origem russa, que teve uma importância central no anarquismo dos EUA. Expulsa em 1919 para a Rússia teve de deixar o país pelas suas críticas à evolução autoritária da Revolução Soviética. Foi uma das primeiras vozes a se levantar contra o autoritarismo comunista.

    Bibliografia:

    Anarquismo e Anarco-sindicalismo na América Latina. Alfredo Gómez. Madrid, Ruedo Ibérico, 1980.

    Cronograma del Anarquismo en Latinoamerica. Coletivo Alas de Xue, Bogotá, 1998.

    Echos y Figuras del Anarquismo Hispanoamericano. Angel Cappelletti. Móstoles, Madre Tierra, 1990.

    História del Pensamiento Socialista. G. D. H. Cole. México, Fundo de Cultura Economica, 1974.

    História do Movimento Operário e das Idéias Socialistas em Portugal (Cronologia). Carlos da Fonseca. Lisboa, Europa-América, 1979.

    La Anarquia Atraves de los Tiempos. Max Nettlau. Barcelona, Antalbe, 1979.

    Universo ácrata. Edgar Rodrigues. Florianópolis, Editora Insular, 1999.

    Utopismo Socialista (1830-1893). Carlos Rama. Venezuela. Biblioteca Ayacucho, s/d.

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    Anarchist Soccer players
    2003 -- US: Revolutionary Soccer Tournament Cup Bay Area, Game 3! last of a 3-game match

    ?

    An Anti-Imperialist Soccer Match... Because Imperialism is Off-Sides! Communists Vs. Anarchists

    Anarchists Faceoff with Communists in Soccer Tournament, 6:00 PM Piedmont, California

    We've run in the streets together. We've been in meetings together. We've strategized against imperialism together. But now it's time for Bay Area Anarchists & Communists to bring our relationship to a whole new level. So we're going to build unity & work out our differences where it really matters -- on the soccer field.

    The last of a 3-game match In some ways, the soccer game played in North Berkeley Sunday afternoon was a typical matchup with cheerleaders, hearty competition, a rousing band & proud parents on the sidelines. But the anarchists vs. the communists soccer match veered off pretty quickly from there. [...]



    [Anti-Details, click here]


    2003 -- NEED EXACT DATE

    Subject: Kenners Wake Resent-Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 16:51:30 -0800 Resent-From: mooc-list@eskimo.com Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 19:50:16 -0500 From: Jesse Walker http://www.spectator.org/dsp_article.asp?art_id=5850 Kenners Wake by Jeet Heer American Spectator Online 12/3/2003, 12:08:44 AM TORONTO -- Hugh Kenner, who died last week at age 80, began his career as a great literary critic in a characteristically eccentric way, by reading a book smuggled in by a priest & visiting a genius locked away in a madhouse. To understand why the book & the genius changed Kenner's life we have to return to Kenner's formative years, in the provincial backwater that was Canada in the 1940s. From a young age, Hugh Kenner was equally interested in the arts & the sciences. As an undergraduate entering the University of Toronto in 1941 Kenner had to decide whether he wanted to major in mathematics & physics or literary studies. Literature won out over science but Kenner would remain blissfully free of the sniffy disdain for technology that so many cultured people confuse with humanism. Canada was an inhospitable place for a budding scholar of modernism: the University of Toronto curriculum stopped dead-cold at 1850. More contemporary books were not only disdained, they were often forbidden by the government. At Canada's skittish border, novels by Balzac, Zola, D.H. Lawrence, & James Joyce were kept out of a country that feared anything foreign & new. One modern masterpiece Kenner did have access to was Joyce's Finnegans Wake, tolerated because it was deemed incomprehensible. Excited by Wake, Kenner discovered that Joyce's Ulysses, otherwise verboten in Canada, could be found in the restricted access section of the University of Toronto library. However, in order to take a look at the illicit text, Kenner needed to secure two letters of reference: one from a religious authority & one from a medical doctor. Kenner knew a priest who could vouch for his morals, but, unfortunately, was not able to find an M.D. who could attest to the fact that reading Joyce would not be corrupting. Ultimately, Kenner had a family friend, a Jesuit priest, smuggle into Canada a copy of the greatest novel of the twentieth century. Compared to the traditional literature, pre-1850 vintage, Joyce seemed wild & chaotic. A friend of the young Kenner argued that he shouldn't expect to find coherence in modern culture, that you can only "just let it hit you." This despairing notion haunted Kenner, raising what he called "the generic twentieth-century problem, discontinuity." As Kenner notes in his book Bucky, reading Joyce & the other modernists forced him to wonder whether we "still have lines of communication open with Jefferson, Socrates, Christ? Or have we spot-welded about ourselves a world we can't think about? Must you just let it hit you?" Kenner was never willing to write off contemporary culture as beyond understanding & he soon found a mentor who shared his hope in finding an underlying order beneath the surface chaos of modern life & literature. Marshall McLuhan, later famous as a gnomic media guru, was then a young English professor interested in the parallels between literature & mass culture. Sharing a fascination with technology & modern culture, McLuhan & Kenner became fast friends. In the warmth of their initial enthusiasm, they had planned to co-write several books, including studies of T.S. Eliot & the cartoonist Al Capp. (Kenner would write the Eliot book alone & the Capp project never came off, although Kenner eventually wrote a book on animation director Chuck Jones.) Both Kenner & McLuhan felt that the great modernists should not be seen as representing a permanent break from the past. Rather, writers like Joyce & Eliot helped us re-connect with tradition, but re-energizing the stories found in Homer & Shakespeare for our times. More than intellectual interests drew Kenner & McLuhan together. Both men were born Protestants but found religious solace in Catholicism. McLuhan converted in 1937 & Kenner would do the same in 1964 (although he had clearly been within the ambit of Catholicism for many years prior). As Catholics enthusiastic about modernist culture & even some forms of lowbrow popular entertainment, Kenner & McLuhan cut against the grain of their adopted faith. After all, Roman Catholicism at that time still lived under the shadow of Pius IX's 1864 "Syllabus of Errors,'' which condemned the idea that "the Roman Pontiff can, & ought to, reconcile himself … with progress, liberalism, & modern civilization.'' Kenner would lament the fact that "middlebrow Catholic intellectuals" of the early twentieth century "found a facile role in condemning modernity en bloc.…Alienation from the whole century could be made to seem a Catholic English layman's moral duty." In their own work, Kenner & McLuhan heralded a newer & more confident Catholic mood of Vatican II, where the church sought to reconcile itself with modernity. In June 1948, Kenner & McLuhan made a fateful trip to visit Ezra Pound, then incarcerated as a mental patient St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, D.C. After his wartime support for Mussolini & alleged descent into madness, Pound's personal & literary reputation was at a low. Yet Kenner found in Pound's company a sane genius. "Enthralled by the master, I resolved that if no one else would make the case for Ezra Pound as a poet, then I would," Kenner once recalled. With McLuhan as an intellectual ally & Pound as a poet needing a champion, the trajectory of Kenner's career was set. Kenner would always remain a loyal Poundian: Kenner's book The Pound Era (1971) is by far the best tribute that poet has received & a classic in twentieth century literary criticism. By contrast, Kenner's friendship with McLuhan would fray. Because Kenner was always a much more facile & readable writer than McLuhan, his early essays & books got a great deal of attention. Quite unfairly, McLuhan accused Kenner of stealing his ideas. The reality was that McLuhan was at his best as an oral thinker, rather like Socrates, who developed his sharpest thoughts in conversation with bright students. Yet when McLuhan tried to transcribe his thoughts, the results were usually a mess, half-developed notions splattered all over the page. McLuhan needed Kenner to complete his thoughts & give them form. Plato had performed a similar function for Socrates. Unlike McLuhan, Kenner was a phrasemaker: his best expository prose hummed & sparkled with wit. It's hard to quote a small passage from Kenner to give a feel for his work, since his greatest effects were in meaty paragraphs. But consider this tribute Kenner wrote to the literary tradition of the "stoic comedian": "Flaubert, Joyce, & Beckett are their own greatest inventions, & the books they contrived, or had their contrivances contrive, record a century of intellectual history with intricate & moving fidelity: suffering our partner the machine to mechanize all that the hand can do yet remaining obstinately, gaily, living; courting a dead end but discovering how not to die." Here, compactly, is the essential Kenner theme: that modernists incorporated the mechanical forces of contemporary life precisely to keep the humanist heritage alive. Kenner's genius was always in doing the unexpected: showing that Pound's poetry illustrated the principles of fractal math, arguing that Alexander Pope anticipated the techniques of Pop Art, demonstrating that Bugs Bunny cartoons gained their speed & energy from tight-fisted economic policies at the Warner Brothers Studio. All of these are unlikely connections, yet Kenner made them real & convincing. He never simply accepted the world as it appeared, but always looked for deeper patterns that demonstrated coherence & order. Perhaps Kenner's Catholic faith gave him confidence to carry out his inquiries, sure in the ultimate goodness of creation. Yet even if those of us who don't share his faith can still cherish the beautiful patterns he uncovered.


    2004 -- » Baader, Andreas

    Anarchist & terrorist, born in Munich, SE Germany. He became associated with the student protest movement of the later 1960s & was imprisoned in 1968. Critical of Germany's post-war materialism & military dominance by the USA, he formed with Ulrike Meinhof the Rote Armee Fraktion (Red Army Faction), a band of underground urban guerrillas. The Faction helped Baader escape from prison in 1970 & carried out a series of terrorist outrages, including bomb attacks, robberies, & kidnappings. He was captured and sentenced to life imprisonment in 1977. An attempt was made by the Faction to secure his release by kidnapping a German businessman, Hans-Martin Schleyer, & holding a Lufthansa airliner hostage at Mogadishu, Somalia, and when this was thwarted he committed suicide. Schleyer was murdered. http://www.biography.com/find/article.jsp?aid=9193760&search=anarchist


    2004 -- Johannes Agnioli über Anarchismus und Marxismus und über die Abschaffung des Staates


    2004 -- Le 7 novembre 2004, à Avricourt (Lorraine), mort de Sébastien BRIAT écrasé par un train de déchets radioactifs à destination de l'Allemagne, alors qu'il tentait avec d'autres militants antinucléaires (par des actions autant pacifiques que symboliques), de bloquer le train pour sensibiliser l'opinion publique contre le danger du nucléaire et le transport de ses déchets. Militant antinucléaire et syndicaliste âgé de 21 ans, Sébastien Briat s'était également investi dans la création de la section étudiante du syndicat CNT-Education de Nancy. http://ytak.club.fr/novembre1.html#briat


    2005 -- befreit die gefangenen ! wir sind für sie draußen...
     the blues is going strong...&nbs23p;
  • panthertanten»click«
  • haschrebellen»click«
  •     bambule»click«
  •   blues»click«
  • http://tommyhaus.org - http://gib.squat.net/blues/twh

    click:»no sound« - click:»no flash + no sound«

     ...and the madness began 
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    2006 --


    Anarchism: A Documentary History Of Libertarian Ideas: From Anarchy to Anarchism (300 CE to 1939)
    Table of contents See the lengthy list at Anarchy Now pages: http://recollectionbooks.com/anow/history/spain/

    Books on the Chinese revolution
    Anarchism in the Chinese Revolution by Arik Dirlik

    Books on the Cuban revolution

    Cuba - The Anarchists & Liberty (15 page pamphlet) by Frank Fernandez The Cuban Revolution - a Critical Perspective by Sam Dolgoff

    Miscellaneous articles

    The Novocherkassk Tragedy, June 1-3 1962 by Piotr Suda

    Workers Solidarity Movement pamphlets

    Marxism & Anarchism THE LEFT...ASHES TO PHOENIX TIME TO BE CONSTRUCTIVE Organisational Platform of the Libertarian Communists Marx & the State Freedom & Revolution Articles on the Russian revolution (part 1) Articles on the Russian revolution (part 2) Articles on the Russian revolution (part 3) The Russian Revolution http://www.geocities.com/WestHollywood/2163/bolintro.html


    3500 -- "Now & then we had a hope that if we lived & were good, God would permit us to be pirates." -Mark Twain


    3500 -- Banging the computer by using your head.

    ?




    ?
    3500 -- updated Freddie Baer graphic:


    3500 -- Marie Louise Berneri (1918-1949) Born in Arezzo, Italy, the elder daughter of Camillo Berneri & Giovanna Berneri. Her father was a very popular & at times controvertial figure in the Italian anarchist moverment of the 1920s, & he & his family went into exile in 1926 for resisting Moussolini.

    Maria Luisa Berneri took on the french version of her name & went to study psychology at the Sorbonne in the mid-1930s. She soon became involved in the anarchist movement & produced the short-lived paper Revision, with Luis Mercier Vega.

    At the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War her father went to Spain, fought on the Aragon front, moved to Barcelona, & edited the prestigious Italian-language revolutionary anarchist paper Guerra di Classe.

    Marie went twice to Barcelona, the second time after her father's assassination by Communists in May, 1937. She subsiquently moved to England & took an active part in the production of the English anarchist paper Freedom.

    Projects Berneri worked on included Spain & the World, Revolt! (the successor to Spain & the World) & being part of one of the small groups which started War Commentary.

    Her wide contacts in & knowledge of the international movement gave her great authority among anarchists, but her libertarian principles & personal modesty prevented her from misusing it. In April 1945 she was one of the four editors of War Commentary who were tried for incitement to disaffection, but she was acquited on a legal technicality (a wife cannot conspire with her husband), and when her tree comerades were imprisioned she took on the main responsibility for maintainign the paper into the postwar period.

    After her death in 1949 from a viral infection, several of her works were published posthumously by Freedom Press; Neither East Nor West & Journey Through Utopia, as well as various contributions to Freedom Press periodicals. http://tigerden.com/~berios/libertarians.html


    3500 -- John Reed Clubs, Italian-Americans & Communist party http://www.libertynet.org/balch/meyer.htm


    3500 --



    3501 -- See Our Dishonest Constitution (B. W. Huebsch, 1914) by Allan L. Benson,
    http://www.crocker.com/~acacia/text_odc.html


    3501 -- Professor J. Allen Smith, of the University of Washington, gives similar testimony in his admirable work, "The Spirit of American Government."

    "It is difficult to understand," says he (pages 31-32), "how any one who has read the proceedings of the Federal Convention can believe that it was the intention of that body to establish a democratic government. The evidence is overwhelming that the men who sat in that convention had no faith in the wisdom or political capacity of the people. Their aim & purpose was not to secure a larger measure of democracy, but to eliminate, as far as possible, the direct influence of the people on legislation & public policy. That body, it is true, contained many illustrious men who were actuated by a desire to further what they conceived to be the wetfare of the country. They represented, however, the wealthy & conservative classes, & had, for the most part, but little sympathy with the popular theory of government."

    Professor Smith also says:

    "In the United States, at the present time, we are trying to make an undemocratic constitution the vehicle of democratic rule. The Constitution was framed for one purpose while we are trying to use it for another."

    Students of the Constitution, from Woodrow Wilson down, know such to be the case. Victims of the Constitution, from the lowliest workingmann up, know nothing of the sort. They believe in the Constitution. They believe it was made for them. Cited in OUR DISHONEST CONSTITUTION by Allan L. Benson Published 1914 by B. W. Huebsch



    http://www.crocker.com/~acacia/text_odc.html


    3509 -- The efforts of teachers like Peter Kropotkin, Louise Michel, Elisée Reclus, & others, inspire the devotees with ever greater energy. Disruption is imminent with the Socialists, who have sacrificed the idea of liberty & embraced the State & politics. The struggle is bitter, the factions irreconcilable. This struggle is not merely between Anarchists & Socialists; it also finds its echo within the Anarchist groups. Theoretic differences & personal controversies lead to strife & acrimonious enmities. http://struggle.ws/revolt/ws98/ws55_louise.html
    http://members.tripod.com/~anarcho/emma.html


    ?
    3509 -- Anselmo Lorenzo Dr Dave Berry

    He has an entry in A. Thomas Lane (ed.), Biographical Dictionary of European Labor Leaders (Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1995), pp.585-6, by Jose Amodia.

    If it's not easy for you to access a copy, let me have your postal address & I'll send you a photocopy.

    Anselmo Lorenzo image, Spunk: http://www.spunk.org/library/index/images.html In his book El Proletariado Militante, Anselmo Lorenzo put forward revolutionary ideas regarding the emancipation of the working class in a future society based on freedom, solidarity & the absence of any sort of authoritarianism. http://www.afmltd.demon.co.uk/meltzer/utopia.html http://ytak.club.fr/noms2.html#e
    Fundación de Estudios Libertarios "Anselmo Lorenzo" - publisher & distributor of Spanish language anarchist books. http://www.ecn.org/a.reus/cntreus/fal/

  • His story "A New God Was Born" appears in The Ancient Mysteries Reader, ed. Peter Haining (Doubleday, 1975)
    http://www.best.com/~contento/t67.html#A1038

    http://home.newyorknet.net/ias/links.htm

    ?
    3509 -- Isolated, Ferrer returned to Paris together with Charles A. Laisant, L. Descartes, Eugenio Fourniere, Charles Malato (Malato, a French revolutionary & propagandist, was a close friend of Francisco Ferrer), A. Naquet, & Sembat.

    Laisant launched a larger letter writing campaign in 1909 when Ferrer was jailed & shot by the Spanish government. Alphonso XIII was a member of the Astronomy Society of France, & Laisant wanted the king's membership suspended. Laisant corresponded with several important figures, including Gabrielle Camille Flammarion, Alfred Naquet, & Francisco Galceran, accusing the king of being a murderer & thus unfit to be a member of the society. It was decided that the Astronomy Society would publish a pamphlet, A LA PORTE DE L'ASSASSIN (Oust the Murderer!) signed by all senior members of the society. The pamphlet, published in 1910, is included at the end of this series.

    Sol Ferrer after the death of her father. The first subseries, CORRESPONDENCE, dated 1891-1914, contains correspondence with several notable figures, including Alejandro Lerroux, Pedro Vallina, Anselmo Lorenzo, & Henri Rochefort. selection of newsletters, announcements, invitations, photographs, and correspondence from several organizations of which Sol Ferrer was a member. The organizations include the World Union of Freethinkers, the International League for Child & Adult Education, & the International Association of the Friends of Francisco Ferrer. Several of the organizations represented in this series sponsored events in memory of the life & work of Francisco Ferrer. Most notable is the Freethinker's 33rd International Congress in 1959, which was devoted entirely to Francisco Ferrer. These materials are arranged alphabetically. play FLOREAL by Jean Pierre Chardon. FLOREAL was translated into Spanish by Anselmo Lorenzo & published by La Escuela Moderna in 1906.

    Illustration by Flavio Costantini

    http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/speccoll/findaids/historical/ferrer


    ?
    3509 -- The Tragic Week, Excerpted from the end of Chapter Seven, The Spanish Anarchists by Murray Bookchin forthcoming from AK Press. I've copied background info about Tragic Week to put the death of Francisco Ferrer into context. FB

    The Anarchists in Solidaridad Obrera were Anarchosyndicalists who believed in operating within large labor movements -- workers like Jose Rodrguez Romero, Tomas Herreros, & the publicist Leopoldo Bonofulla. Encouraged by Ferrer, they opened a concerted attack on the Socialists & tried to guide the labor federation toward revolutionary goals. Their efforts, fostered by the drift of the early French CGT toward revolutionary syndicalism, were to be marked by increasing success. The periodical Solidaridad Obrera soon fell under Anarchosyndicalist control, & on June 13, 1909, a congress of the labor federation voted overwhelmingly to accept the general strike tactic "depending upon circumstances."

    Anarchosyndicalists were viewed with disdain by the Barcelona Anarchist Communists associated with the periodical Tierra y Libertad & the terrorist-oriented Grupo 4 de Mayo (May 4th Group). This handful of purists was all that remained of the much larger Anarchist Communist movement formed in the 1890s. Their ranks had been terribly depleted by arrests & persecutions. Owing to a lack of funds, they were compelled to give up their headquarters & meet in the offices of the newspaper. The editors, Juan Baron & Francisco Cardenal, regarded the Anarchosyndicalists as deserters to reformism & held faithfully to the doctrines that had formed the basis of the old Anarchist Organization of the Spanish Region.

    Illustration by Flavio Costantini

    http://struggle.ws/revolt/spain/tragic_book.html
    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/8195/blasts/pointblank/spanishrevolution.htm

    3509 --
    No. 15 ~ 6/1998 ---
    A Soldier Returns
    Jacobo Maguid
    A Fragment Of Luigi
    Galleani's Life
    Sébastien Faure & the La Ruche Experimental School
    Clément Duval
    Books Galore!
    Money - & other things.

    Future Plans for the KSL

    No. 14 ~ March, 1998 ---
    A Rebel in Barcelona: Jack White's first Spanish impressions
    Alexander Shapiro: The USSR & the CNT: an unconscionable stance
    Maximoff on the Russian Counter-Revolution
    Forgotten Anarchists No. 9: Virgilia d'Andrea by J. Grancharoff
    The Vanquished Who Do Not Die by Virgilia d'Andrea

    Michael Schirru by Melchior Seele
    Clément Duval Corrections
    KSL News

    No. 13 ~ 1997 ---
    An Anarchist on Devil's Island
    Birth of the FAI
    Kate Sharpley Library Partial wants list
    Mother Earth Publishing Association

     Unknown Anarchists: Celso Persici
    Latest Publications of the KSL

    No. 12 ~ 1997 ---
    Why The Blast? by Alexander Berkman
    In memoriam: Alexander Berkman
    Interview with Leo Voline
    Some Militants of the CNT

    Done March 2004: Joaquin Pallarés TomásJoaquin Pallarès Tomás

    http://recollectionbooks.com/bleed/Encyclopedia/IlleraMacario.htm>Macario Illera Tejada


    , José Siliceo Victorio, The 'Los Queros' Guerrilla band, Benigno Andrade Garcia, Juan Brell Piñol, José
    Ledo Limia
    & Benigno Mancebo

    No. 11 ~ 1997 ---
    THE FRIENDS OF DURRUTI 1937-1939
    Jaime Balius - IN SELF DEFENCE: I Demand an Explanation
    Little Known Anarchists No 5: Dan Chatterton
    Unknown Anarchists No 6: Ross Winn. By Emma Goldman
    Remembering Luigi Fabbri
    Jack White
    Feedback
    What is the Kate Sharpley Library?

    No. 10 ~ 1997
    KSL News
    Durruti - Before the Storm: A letter from Durruti
    Makhno's "Black Cross"
    Little Known Anarchists, Number 3: John McAra
    Collectivised Cinema: Films made by the socialised film
    industry (CNT-
    FAI) in Barcelona during the civil war
    "Anarcho-Syndicalism" - A history of the FAUD
    Secrets of the KSL

    No. 9 ---
    Little Known Anarchists No 2: BULGARIA: A. M. Nakov, Anarchist Militant
    SOME LITTLE KNOWN ANARCHISTS: Sam Mainwaring
    The Groupe d'Etudes Scientifiques: the Scientific Spleen Squad
    Makhno's Philosophers

    No. 6 ~ September, 1996
    Albert Meltzer
    Robert Lynn: Glasgow 1924-1996
    Kate Sharpley's Story
    Matters Arising
    Appeal
    KSL Publications
    Andre Prudhommeaux- profile By Charles Jacquier
    nul points section
    Halldor Laxness (1902- )
    Kate Sharpley Library: Accounts
    The Meltzer Press
    Pamphlets From The Kate Sharpley Library

    No. 5 ---
    Did Kropotkin Support World War I?
    Anarchists Against Hitler: The Underground FAUD in the Rhineland
    From a Peace Museum to a Hitler Barracks
    Lives Remembered: Ambrose Barker & Ella Twynan
    The Svensk Arbetaren Centralorganisation (Sweden)
    K.S.L.

    No. 4 ---
    A Rebel Spirit
    Aldred Of Glasgow
    Spanish Resistance: The People Named
    The Direct Action Movement 

    No. 3  ~  November, 1992
    Scope of the Library
    The Humble Soapbox
    Ongoing anarchist Movements (1) -The Anarchist Black Cross

    No. 2 ---
    The Problems of Anarchist History
    The Kate Sharpley Library
    Library News
    Argentinean Anarchist Library
    Women Pioneers
    Homestead Revisited
    Joe Hill
    Newcastle Fights theFascists
    Why can't I see it yet?

    No. 1 ---
    Draft Statutes at the (reconstituted) Kate Sharpley Library
    The story of the Moscow gold: How the Spanish war was lost
    Was Tolstoy An Anarchist? The two caricatures of Anarchism
    Anarchist Literature: "It must Begin Again"
    Library News

     

    http://flag.blackened.net/ksl/


    3509 -- Etta Federn 1883-1951 Already Emma Goldman had, when she was on round trip by republican Spain, in whom magazine " Mujeres Libres " some historical women presented, in order to disprove by the representation of the " amazing acts of the women in the past the legend of its inferiority " (S.94). It was fundamental constituent of the toolistic adult education to strengthen the self-confident its of the Spaniards & to unfold directed the " knowledge around a woman Mrs. " (S.94) with them together. But it was methodically meaningful to use among other things historical Frauenportraits as medium to give in particular in order " possible orientation models " (S.94).

    The roof federation " Agrupación Mujeres Libres " had developed explicitly from the realization & experience that the active, mostly young Anarchistinnen their specific requests & problems within the existing libertaeren local's groups & express could not bring in (the term " more libertaer " covers here both anarchistische & anarchosyndikalistische beginnings). anarchosyndikalistischen women's movement of Barcelona Etta feathers/springs literature, language & Paedagogik informed. According to the model of the " Escuela Moderna " of the libertaeren paedagogue Francisco Ferrer (1859-1909) it developed own libertaer educational concepts. Later it - likewise in connection with the " Mujeres Libres " - created a libertaeres school center in the katalonischen place Blanes, whose chief was also it

    Until 1932 she had found after two marriages failed & as Alleinernaehrerin of its family refuge within the anarchosyndikalistischen movement of Berlin. The co-operation in the FAUD (" free worker union of Germany ") - for their magazines it additionally regularly contributions wrote - unfolded soon to a close, basic social relations network. In particular the intimate friendship with Rudolf Rocker & Milly Witkop Rocker held lifelong. 1936 Emma Goldman forms CNT-FAI London Committee & made representative of CNT-FAI Exterior Propaganda London bureau. http://www.comlink.de/~graswurzel/225/federn.html
    http://perso.wanadoo.fr/libertaire/archive/2000/233-nov/mujeres.htm


    3509 -- Kropotkin was as busy as he & they saw little of each other, being separated by large distances. But Cherkesov, the old friend of both, lived at no great distance and visited both of them constantly. Tarrida del Marmol was a very good friend of his. I passed a day with him & Malatesta at Higharn's Park, N. E., where Tarrida lived & died so untimely in March, 1915, aged but fifty-four. Malatesta wrote of him: "I, personally, perhaps never happened to agree with him --- and. we were all the same the best of friends. One could quarrel with him, but could not help to love him, because he was above all a loving & lovable man. & in saying so, I mean to pay him the greatest tribute that can be paid to a man" ("Freedom, April, 1915). By Tarrida he would no, doubt have known Francisco Ferrer, when he came to London. He spent many evenings with Arnold Roller, who then wandered all over Europe as a young knight errant of the general strike, today striking a blow at German militarism & another day exploring the Republic of Andorra as the first solitary anarchist who probably ever was there. Louise Michel, Alfred March & T. H. Keell of "Freedom," Harry Kelly & Rudolph Rocker might be named, but who did not know him & how many names do we ignore! Luigi Fabbri & Jacques Mesnil, on their visits to London, should be added. Whatever the length of his exile may be, Malatesta always remains in such close touch with the movement & the whole social & political life of Italy that from the "Questione Sociale" of 1883 to "Volanti" thirty years later, a well-made and ample paper always seems to originate under his hands at a moment's notice, a Errico Malatesta The Biography of an Anarchist A Condensed Sketch of Malatesta from the book written by by Max Nettlau Published by the Jewish Anarchist Federation New York City. 1924
    http://www.pitzer.edu/~dward/Anarchist_Archives/malatesta/nettlau/nettlauonmalatesta.html

    3509 -- Left-Wing Films archive



    ANTI-AUTHORITARIAN STRUGGLES

    10 Rillington Place - True drama of a British murder case that led to the abolition of the death penalty. John Hurt stars as a man sentenced to die for the murder of his family, a crime he didn't commit.(111 min.)

    1984 - The 1984 production with the Eurhythmics soundtrack & Richard Burton as the party official. (115m)

    Arise, My Love (Mitchell Leisen, 1940) Claudette Colbert is a journalist who, in trying to demonstrate that women can take on non-fluff assignments, rescues Ray Milland from a Franco firing squad. Together they attempt to get the U.S. out of its isolationist complacency. (Steve Press)

    Blade Runner - The plight of enslaved cyborgs & our corporate-dominated future through eyes ofa sympathetic cop. (113m)

    The Blue Kite (1993, Tian Zhuang- zhuang) A boy, born in Beijing in 1954, grows up amid the political upheaval & zealotry of the Cultural Revolution. One day his father's library co-workers meet to practice "self-criticism" and to identify reactionaries in their midst. When the boy's father returns from the toilet, all eyes are on him: He has been selected as the reactionary, and that is his death sentence. The mother remarries twice seeking stability, unsuccessfully. It's a remarkable portrait of a society victimized by ideology." Review by Roger Ebert, in Mother Jones, 1996"

    Brazil (1985, Terry Gilliam) In a dystopian vision, Gilliam takes what Kafka started to operatic heights in a film that is fantastic but not, finally, unrealistic." Review by John Sayles, in Mother Jones, 1996"

    Brute Force (Jules Dassin, 1947) Burt Lancaster & Charles Bickford are leaders of two gangs of inmates in a prison. They form a united front to effect a break-out, as the sadistic captain of the guards (Hume Cronyn) stages a coup d'etat & overthrows the more humane, but impotent warden. While the film is an obvious metaphoric depiction of fascism, it is also a statement of existential despair: no one ever escapes. (Steve Press)

    Burnt by the Sun (1994, Nikita Mikhalkov) A lament for the loss of idealism. A populist Red general & eccentrics holed up in an artists' retreat are the last to get the news of Stalin's purges. The director and his own daughter play the leads. " Review by John Sayles, in Mother Jones, 1996"

    Catch 22 - A brilliant dark comedy about mercantilism & the military.

    Clockwork Orange - An argument against involuntary behavior modification that portrays the beauty of stylish rapes & beatings along the way.

    The Fallen Sparrow (Richard Wallace, 1943). John Garfield plays a Spanish Civil War veteran who is haunted by his experiences of torture at the hands of Franco's army, & who is being pursued by Fascists in New York. (Steve Press)

    Farewell My Concubine Chen Kaige's beautiful & achingly sad portrayal of a doomed love triangle between two Chinese opera stars, and a former prostitute. Following the protagonists from the '49 revolution through the Cultural Revolution, portrays the horror of Maoist totalitarianism.

    Fatherland In this HBO special, it is 1964 in an alternative history. The Normandy invasion failed. Germany conquered Europe. Russian Communist guerrillas continue a defensive fight against occupying Germany. Dignitaries gather in Berlin, the capitol of European Germania, to celebrate the Fuhrer's 75th birthday. The focal point is the scheduled meeting between Hitler & U.S. President Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr., which may bring an end to U.S. aid to the Russian guerrillas. But a German police officer and a visiting American journalist discover evidence of the completely covered-up Holocaust, & race to deliver it to the American delegation to prevent detente.

    Hangmen Also Die (Fritz Lang, 1943) Brian Donlevy assassinates Nazi butcher Reinhard Heydrich in occupied Czechoslavakia. (Steve Press)

    Heatwave (Phillip Noyce, 1983, Australia) Judy Davis plays an activist fighting the demolition & replacement of homes in a low-income neighborhood with high end housing. The film, which is based on real events, depicts a shadowy relationship between legitimate developers & organized crime. Based on the same events,  The Killing of Angel Street (Donald Crombie, 1981, Australia)  further explores corrupt official involvement, from the local police all the way up to the highest levels of government. (Steve Press)

    Hey, Babu Riba (Gala Videnovic, 1986, Yugoslavia) Coming of age film set in Yugoslavia just after Tito broke with Stalin. (Steve Press)

    In the Name of the Father (1993, Jim Sheridan) A "paddy thief" is swept into the black hole of the Irish-British conflict. Sheridan presents his main characters as unwilling pawns, then uses them to flush out the bigger players."Review by John Sayles, in Mother Jones, 1996"

    Invasion of the Body Snatchers (Don Siegel, 1956) Can be taken as red scare propaganda or as a warning against the authoritarianism and mind-numbing conformity of the McCarthy era. In Invasion of the Body Snatchers (Phil Kaufman, 1978), the first remake, global pollution is the enemy. In The Body Snatchers (Abel Ferrara, 1993), the second remake, the military is the enemy. (Steve Press)

    The Kiss of the Spiderwoman - A radical activist imprisoned by a Latin dictatorship in the same cell with a romantic homosexual, discovers their solidarity against oppression.

    The Last Supper (1996) -  a group of liberal grad students take it upon themselves to rid the world of future right-wing extremists (abortion doctor killers, anti-feminists, homophobics, book banners) by inviting them over for Sunday dinner & poisoning them....if their minds can't be changed. A lovely little dark comedy!

    Lord of the Flies - Classic, chilling tale of British schoolboys stranded on a remote island without adults, & their homemade society's slide into savagery. (90 min.)

    Mephisto (1981, Istvan Szabo) "Klaus Maria Brandauer, in one of the best performances I've ever seen, plays a German actor who is, at first, a socialist & the proud lover of a black woman--but by the end has found that his beliefs were a pose, & happily discards them to gain success under Hitler. As he climbs to the top of the Nazi propaganda structure and the bottom of his own soul, the movie is both merciless & understanding. This is a weak & shameful man, the film seems to say--but then it cautions us against throwing the first stone."Review by Roger Ebert, in Mother Jones, 1996"

    Metropolis - Robot chick leads the oppressed workers in revolt.

    Modern Times - Worker guy, Charlie Chaplin, caught in the cogs of the industrial wheel.

    Nasty Girl, The - German woman gets in big trouble when she starts investigating her town's collaboration with the Third Reich.

    Not Without My Daughter - True story of an American woman who risked life & veil to rescue her daughter from Islamic fundamentalist Iran.

    The Official Story - (1985, Luis Puenzo) The adoptive parents of children whose parents were disappeared by the Argentine junta.The emotional fallout of Argentina's "dirty war," starring a terrific Norma Aleandro. Posits that political awareness is a responsibility, not an option." Review by John Sayles, in Mother Jones, 1996"

    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) - A rebellious mental patient challenges institution, gets fried, inspires native American to seek freedom.

    People Under the Stairs - Courageous African-American houseburglar liberates tongueless zombies from the basement of Ron & Nancy Reagan's prison-America.

    The Rapture - Woman confronts God, the ultimate dictator, after she kills her daughter in a religious frenzy.

    Romero - The life & death of El Salvador's martyred social justice Bishop.

    Seven Samurai, The - Kurosawa's masterpiece, about seven samurai who train a village in armed self-defense, helping them defeat marauding bandits. The depiction of class & caste is raw & riveting.

    Schindler's List (1993, Steven Spielberg) The story of a flawed and complex man who decides, while working for the Nazi war machine, to shelter some 1,000 Jews. Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson) begins by sucking up to the Nazis, but some deep chord in his soul is struck, & he begins to cheat them of money, work, & lives. It's a rare blending of superb Hollywood artistry & deeply felt emotional & political content."Review by Roger Ebert, in Mother Jones, 1996"

    Shoah (1985, Claude Lanzmann) This nine-hour film is one of the most remarkable documents imaginable about the Holocaust. Without using documentary footage from the war, Lanzmann relies on eyewitnesses, narration, and the eerie remains of the death camps to investigate a chapter of human horror. His film is patient: He listens to his subjects as they run through their rehearsed feelings about events that occurred 40 years earlier, and we watch them reveal the lessons they've absorbed into their very beings."Review by Roger Ebert, in Mother Jones, 1996"

    Sleeper - Woody Allen, refugee from the 20th century, becomes leader of the revolt against a future oppressive regime.

    Sneakers (1992) A group of security analysts, including Robert Redford, Dan Akroyd, & Sidney Poitier, are offered a job by the CIA and when they are reluctant, pressure is brought to bear by the threat to disclose the identity of their leader, a 60s radical with outstanding warrants. A chip exists that will allow any computer to be cracked, & organized crime will soon control it, though sudden changes in their police records suggest that it is already operational.

    Spartacus (1960) - Classic story of Roman slave revolt leader. Watch for the homoerotic "do you like snails?" master-slave scene that was expurgated by the censors, but added back in re-release.

    Terminator, Terminator 2 - Arnold Schwarzenegger makes a lot of radical films, such as the Terminator movies, for the Republican bimbo that he is. In the Terminator films, the military-industrial complexes computers have become sentient, & carried out their anti-human programming. In T1, the future robot empire sends a cyborg back in time to kill the mother of the future leader of the human resistance. In T2, a suspence-action classic, this same mother is a hardened guerrilla who mid-way through the movie blows up a central military-industrial research facility.

    They Live - A homeless drifter discovers that yuppies & the Republican elite of the U.S. have been bought out by ugly aliens, who are beaming obedience messages at us from billboards, newspapers & TV. Problem is you can't see that they're aliens unless you're wearing these special sunglasses, so people get a little upset when he starts blowing the yuppie alien heads off.

    THX-113 - More horrific than 1984, George Lucas' first film, produced by Francis Ford Coppola, & starring Robert Duvall as the worker drone awakening to the need for freedom in a subterranean, post-individualist society.

    Tin Drum, The - Midget with a drum terrorizes the Third Reich.

    Tito & Me (Goran Markovic, 1992, Yugoslavia) A young boy causes delightfully anarchic chaos during a party-sponsored "march around Tito's homeland" (i.e., Croatia).

    The White Rose - German film with sub-titles, about a group of young Germans resisting the Nazis during WWII - a tragic ending

    Wisdom - Emilio Estevez stars as a chronically unemployed ex-con who sets himself up as a modern day Robin Hood, knocking over banks to destroy mortgages & help the poor. (109 min.)

    Yellow Submarine - The struggle against the Blue Meanies by the boys from Liverpool is a brilliant allegory for world uprising against the Bad guys.

    Z - A gripping true-life Greek drama about the assassination and cover-up of a leader of the resistance movement in Greece. This is an exciting film by Costa-Gavras. Dubbed in English. (127 min.)



    http://www.dsausa.org/dsa/rl/Docs/Films.html


    3509 -- See our ARCHIVES DATABASE, ANARCHIST

    FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia), the ELN (National Liberation Army); EPI (Peopleís Liberation Army) ; Anarchism in Colombia;

    Elisee Reclus intention of setting up a colony there; self-managing commune set up by J. Albarracin. 1910 publication of Ravachol, a newspaper Trofeos (1908), Crepuscolo (1910-1911), El Obrero (1912-1916), & Paz y Amo; three labor congresses with libertarian presence; groups like the Antorcha Libertaria in Bogota, Via Libre in Barranquilla, Grupo Libertario in Santa Marta, FOLA (Atlantic Coast labor Federation) ; embrace sixteen trade unions from that area.

    leading publication included La Voz Popular, La Antorcha, El Sindicalista, Pensamiento y Voluntad, etc.

    Raul Eduardo Mahecha; Vargas Vila; Juan de Dios Romero, "anarchist & adventurer" (as he described himself). Biofilo Panclasta; Alas de Xue-AIT grouping, a collective; publication of the book "Biofilo Panclasta, the Eternal Captive"; joined the IWA; co-ordination of groups in Colombia, festival last May under the name of "May 68-69, the relevance of libertarian thinking". ; anarchists from Bogota, Cali & Medellin,; Humberto Pena Taylor & numerous human rights activists among victims of paramilitary groups also threatened to attack the National University while the libertarian festival was in progress; sympathisers among the Law Library of the National University (who helped organise the festival) ; improvised collectives the Anarquistas al Combate group.; anarchists among the membership of the superb La Libelula Dorada theatre troupe, stunning & now resurrected libertarian publication Biofilos. In Medellin city there is the Vargas Vila Libertarian Collective; ONIC (National Indian Organisation of Colombia); Colombian libertarians can be contacted at: Alas de Xue-AIT Apdo. Aereo 52477 Bogota (Columbia) e-mail: smtorrer@bachue.usc.unal.edu.co (From CNT September 1998) See our ARCHIVES DATABASE, ANARCHIST for full article, The Viability of Libertarian ideas in Colombia http://members.xoom.com/blakflag


     ?
    3509 -- Federico Urales. ANARCHIST ARCHIVES, NEED SOME DATES FOR URALES Germinal Esgleas dies. Spanish anarchist militant & companion of Federica Montseny. Collaborator on "Revista Blanca", with Secretary-general of the CNT. During exile (in France), he was imprisoned by fascist Vichy government. The Novela Ideal genre, devised by the Urales family, the parents of Federica Montseny, sought to spread anarchism’s ethical ideas in readily accessible prose. Maria BATET: The Novela Ideal did sterling work among the young. There were very interesting themes, religious themes as well, in fact especially, because at the time religion in Spain held great sway & always has. They were always on the look-out for the other side of the coin, to combat religion. http://www.afmltd.demon.co.uk/meltzer/utopia.html Soledad Gustavo (Teresa Mané) lives, Villanova. Catalan anarchist free thinker, met Joan Montseny (Federico Urales) at a conference she had just given (with Anselmo Lorenzo). Their relationship results in a daughter, Federica Montseny (12 February 1905), an important figure in Spanish anarchism. Very cultivated, Soledad was one of the first lay teachers in Spain. With her companion Montseny, founded "Revista Blanca" in 1898. Wrote El sindicalismo y la anarquia. Died in Perpignan February 2, 1939. "Towards the end of the 19th century, Soledad Gustavo & Federico Urales were the founders, first, of Tierra y Libertad & of the Revista Blanca. The latter achieved a print-run of 12,000 copies." http://www.afmltd.demon.co.uk/meltzer/utopia.html  ? http://flag.blackened.net/liberty/cnt.html
    http://www.altern.com/cnt/ukwelco.htm



    3510 -- REFERENCE FROM KEN KNABB BUREAU PUBLIC SECRETS; IF REFERENCE FOUND HERE, GO HIS WEB PAGE FOR EASY FINDING/LOCATING

    Site Index

    References are to the numbered web pages listed at the bottom of this page. Once you click to one of those pages, you can use your computer’s search form to search that page for references to the topic.

    In the case of names & other specific topics, virtually every mention of the term is indexed. Broader or very frequently mentioned topics (“situationists,” “spectacle,” “revolution,” etc.) are indexed more selectively, omitting mere passing mentions. In some cases, especially when there are numerous references to a topic, boldface indicates texts containing particularly significant passages on the topic (one or more paragraphs). Underlined boldface indicates texts that are largely or entirely devoted to a topic.

    If you use this index frequently, you may find it more convenient to print it out & use the separate web page list, instead of constantly reloading the whole index. Bear in mind, however, that entries are constantly being added to the index — an old copy will not cover the latest texts added to the site.

    Note (June 2000): This index contains references to only a few of the main topics of Rexroth’s Communalism. For a more complete indexing of that book, which contains hundreds of references to historical events and utopian movements, see the separate index to it. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A AAUD (radical German labor union), 59 Abetz, Otto, 70 Ace, Johnny, 308 Action Committees (May 1968), 55, 56, 103 Acratas (Spain), 56 L’Action Française (fascistic French journal), 137, 204 Adam & Eve, 157 Adams, John, 106, 146 Adenauer, Konrad, 24 adhocracy, 104 Adler, Max, 59 Adler, Mortimer, 105 Adorno, Theodor, 75 advertising, 4, 29, 50, 117, 119, 255 affective détournement, 118, 131, 132, 190 affinity groups, 103, 104, 134, 264 AFGES (Strasbourg Student Union), 49, 71 Afghanistan, 101 Africa, 37, 38, 39, 48 L’Age d’or (Bunuel film), 50 Agence pour l’auto-suppression du prolétariat (Lille), 146 Agentur für die Selbstaufhebung des Proletariats (Berlin), 146 Aggressive School of Cultural Workers (Iowa), 146 Aitken, Robert, 158 Akerström, Fred, 308 Alba, Victor, 103 Alba Congress (1956), 5, 6, 7, 13 Albania, 24, 57, 105 Albert, Michael, 104 Albert, Stew, 252 Albigensians, 308 Algeria, 24, 38, 48, 52, 71, 111 —revolt against France (1954-1962), 5, 28, 39, 48 —self-management struggles (1962-1965), 37, 39, 45, 54, 263 alienation, 23, 27, 28, 41, 46, 111, 118, 136, 139, 141, etc. Alinsky, Saul, 158 Allen, Woody, 142 Allende, Salvador, 135 Alpert, Alan, 205 Alternative (Belgium), 21 alternative institutions, 102, 125 Althusser, Louis, 49, 71 American Civil War (1861-1865), 103 Amish, 139 anarchism, anarchists, 25, 27, 40, 56, 59, 66, 71, 73, 75, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 119, 129, 130, 133, 138, 139, 157, 190, 191, 192, 251, 254, 263, 264. See also separate “Communalism” index. —American, 105, 106, 139, 157, 205 —Chinese, 107 —French, 49, 55, 56, 63, 71, 73, 75 —Italian, 59, 75, 123 —Japanese, 107, 130, 133, 190 —Polish, 107 —Spanish, 28, 59, 103, 139, 144 Anarchism (Japan), 130, 133, 146 Anarchism Today (ed. Apter & Joll), 75, 129 Anarchist Circle. See Libertarian Circle Anarchist Federation (France), 73, 75 Anarchist Review (England), 146 anarcho-Maoism, 57 anarcho-primitivists, anarcho-technophobes, 192, 257 Anarchos (New York), 105, 106, 264 Anarchy (London), 75, 105 Anarchy: A Journal of Desire Armed (Missouri), 146, 191, 192 Andersen, Hans Christian, 137 Andreotti, Libero, 76 Anglo-Catholicism, 137, 138 Angola, 101 Angry Brigade (England), 129 Angry Young Men, 9 Ansgar-Elde, 26 anticolonial struggles. See Third World Anti-Mass, 114, 262, 263 anti-situationist art, 26, 31, 35 Antoine, 71 Apollinaire, Guillaume, 137, 308 Apostolidès, Jean-Marie, 76 Aquinas, Thomas, 105, 137 Arab countries, 37, 48, 57, 103, 135 Arab-Israel war (Six Day War, 1967), 48 Arabian Nights, 105 Arafat, Yasser, 141 Aragon, Louis, 42, 49, 253 Aragon agrarian collectives (Spanish revolution), 59 architecture & urbanism, 2, 3, 7, 8, 15, 17, 18, 22, 24, 40, 60, 69, 70, 102, 104, 203. See also unitary urbanism; psychogeography; dérives Aref, Abd-ul-Rahman (Iraqi ruler), 48 Argentinian guerrillas, 50 Arguments (Paris), 28, 29, 41, 55, 56, 58, 71, 75 Ariadne, 2 Aristotle, 105, 128, 157 Armstrong, Louis, 137 Aron, Raymond, 56 Arshinov, Peter, 101 art, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 14, 16, 19, 23, 26, 29, 30, 35, 36, 40, 42, 67, 68, 70, 102, 104, 107, 110, 139, 192, 203, 253. See also culture & society; poetry; film; détournement art criticism, 14, 68 Artaud, Antonin, 114 Ashley, Clarence, 105 Asimov, Isaac, 107 —Our Angry Earth: A Ticking Ecological Bomb (w/Pohl), 104 assemblyists, 104. See also popular assemblies astrology, 107, 138 Asturias (region in Spain): —1934 insurrection, 25, 27, 32, 40, 69, 101 —1960s strikes, 32, 37, 60, 72 At Dusk: The Situationist Movement in Historical Perspective (Jacobs & Winks), 130, 190 Atelier de Création Libertaire (Lyon), 146 Athanarópoulos, Tákes, 146 Athens (ancient), 104, 128, 137, 191, 264 Atkins, Guy, 75 Aufheben (England), 191, 192 Augustine, Saint, 28, 203 Aurelius, Marcus, 137 Austro-Marxism, 59 automation, 12, 28, 104 automobiles, 3, 10, 17, 25, 104, 191 avant-garde movements, 7 Avatamsaka Sutra, 138 Avrich, Paul, 101 Axelos, Kostas, 41 Azerbaijans, 103, 135 B Baath Party, 48 Babeuf, Gracchus, 139 Bach, Johann Sebastian, 105 —Well-Tempered Clavichord, 308 Bad: The Autobiography of James Carr, 106 Baez, Joan, 105, 139, 308 Baghdad comrades, 37 Baguette Quartette, 107 Baj, Enrico, 5 Bakunin, Mikhail, 70, 75, 105, 129, 133, 139, 190, 203 Baluchis, 103, 135 BAMN: Outlaw Manifestos & Ephemera 1965-1970 (ed. Stansill & Mairowitz), 75 La Bande des Dialecticiens (Brussels), 146 Bandini, Mirella, 76 Baran & Sweezy, 76 Barb (Berkeley), 251 Barbara (French singer), 308 Bardot, Brigitte, 28 Barjonet, André, 56, 73 Barrès, Maurice, 27 Barrot, Jean, 191 —“Critique of the Situationist International,” 75 —Eclipse & Re-Emergence of the Communist Movement (w/Martin), 75, 191 Barth, 59 Barthes, Roland, 34, 71 Basho, Matsuo, 107 Baudelaire, Charles, 32, 105, 137 Baudet, Jean-Pierre, 192 Baudrillart, Jean, 49 Bauhaus, 6, 7 Bauhaus (Nashist), 31 Bayen, Maurice, 58, 75 Beard, Henry, 102 Beardsley, Michael, 105, 107 Beardsley, Nancy, 105, 107 Béart, Guy, 107 Beatles, 105, 113, 265, 308 Beats, Beat Generation, 9, 71, 105, 107, 137, 139 Beauvoir, Simone de, 45 Bebel, August, 125 Becker-Ho, Alice (Debord), 76 Beethoven, Ludwig van, 47, 131 —Eroica Symphony, 4 behindism, 106, 118, 190 Beijing-Bao, 18 Beirne, Joe, 262 Belafonte, Harry, 308 Béland, Paul, 107 Belgium, 14, 25, 102 Belmondo, Jean-Paul, 68 Ben Bella, Ahmed, 37, 39, 45, 54, 135 Ben-Bellaism, 52, 59 Benes, Eduard, 57 Bense, Max, 41 Berreby, Gérard, 76 Berger, John, 75 Beria, Lavrenti, 47 Berkeley: —in the sixties, 105 —Free Speech Movement (FSM), 37, 38, 71, 72, 103, 105, 112, 205, 254, 264 Berkman, Alexander, 105, 137, 139 Bermudes, Winston, 70 Berne, Eric, 107 Berneri, Marie Louise, 104, 192 Bernstein, Eduard, 48, 71 Bernstein, Michèle, 2, 7, 13, 75, 76 —“No Useless Leniency,” 106 —“Victories” (series of paintings below), 36, 70 —Victory of the Bonnot Gang, 36 —Victory of the Great Jacquerie of 1358, 36 —Victory of the Paris Commune, 36 —Victory of the Spanish Republicans, 36 —Victory of the Workers Councils of Budapest, 36 Berque, Jacques, 46 Bertrand, André, 49 Besançon, Julien, 203 Bhagavad Gita, 137 Bible, 105, 137, 158. See also separate “Communalism” index. Bierce, Ambrose, 203 Biermann, Wolf, 308 Big Brother & the Holding Company, 105 Bigorgne, Gérard, 56 Birth of a Nation (Griffith film), 4 Black & Red (Michigan), 76, 105, 106, 157 Black Mask (New York), 62 Black Mass, 4 Black Muslims, 37, 54 black nationalism, 37, 38 Black Panthers, 105, 106, 112, 264 Black Power, 54, 55 blacks, American, 37, 38, 54, 71, 143, 264, 265, 308. See also civil rights movement; Watts riot Blake, William, 104, 105, 137, 139, 154 Blanchard, Daniel (alias Pierre Canjuers), 67 —“Preliminaries Toward Defining a Unitary Revolutionary Program” (w/Debord), 24, 139 Blanco, Secundo, 59 Blanqui, Louis-Auguste, 69 Blanquism, 25, 75 Blazwick, Iwona, 76 Bloch, Joseph, 129 Bloch, Nadine, 1, 106, 107, 121, 130, 146 The Blue Bird (Maeterlinck), 204 blues, 105, 139, 308 Boehme, Jakob, 132 —The Signature of All Things, 137 Boggs, Dock, 105 bohemianism, 29, 71, 308 Bolloten, Burnett, 103 Bolo’bolo (P.M.), 104 Bolshevik revolution. See Russia: 1917 revolution Bolshevism, Bolsheviks, Bolshevik Party, 28, 39, 40, 41, 47, 48, 52, 55, 57, 59, 69, 71, 74, 101, 103, 105, 106, 111, 116, 119, 139. See also Leninism; Trotskyism. See also separate “Communalism” index. Bonaparte, Napoleon, 4, 27, 203 Bonnefoy, Yves, 308 Bonnie & Clyde, 308 Bonnot Gang, 36, 50 boredom, 25, 203 Borman, Frank, 61 Bookchin, Murray, 75, 76, 106, 157, 205, 264 —“The May-June Events in France,” 75 —Post-Scarcity Anarchism, 191 —Social Anarchism versus Lifestyle Anarchism, 191, 192 —To Remember Spain, 103 Boorstin, Daniel, 253 Borkenau, Franz, 103 Bossuet, Jacques-Bénigne, 75 Boumaza, Bachir, 39, 45 Boumédienne, Houari, 37, 38, 39, 45, 48, 54, 135 “Bourderon & Passedieu” (Pierre Bourdieu & J.C. Passeron), 71 Bourdieu, Pierre. See above bourgeois revolution, 23, 28, 29, 52, 55, 101, 102, 103, 132, 201, 202 Bourne, Randolph, 139, 204 Bourricaud, François, 56 Bourseiller, Christophe, 76 Bové, José, 156 Boy Scouts, 105 boycotts, consumer strikes, 103 Bracken, Len, 76 Bradley, Michael, 190 Brakhage, Stan, 105 Brassens, Georges, 107, 139, 308 Braun, Werner von, 61 Brazil, 24 Breá, Juan, 103 breaks & exclusions, 7, 13, 19, 35, 36, 43, 51, 62, 66, 106, 130, 131, 132, 157, 191. See also revolutionary organization Brecher, Jeremy, 103 Brecht, Bertolt, 4, 7, 10, 75, 102, 145 —“Anecdotes of Herr Keuner,” 114 —Mother Courage, 4 Brel, Jacques, 107, 308 Brenan, Gerald, 102, 103 Brendel, Cajo, 134 Breton, André, 9, 32, 41, 75, 105, 137, 203 Brezhnev, Leonid, 47, 57 Brinton, Maurice, 101 British Columbia phone strike (1981), 103 British Mandate (over Palestine), 48 Brook, James, 76 Brooks, Van Wyck, 137, 157 Brotherhood of the Free Spirit, 132, 139. See also separate “Communalism” index. Broué, Pierre, 103 Brown, Bernard E., 75 Brown, Bill, 190 Brown, Bruce, 75, 129 Brown, James, 308 Brown, Jerry, 158 Brown, Norman O., 253 Bruant, Aristide, 107, 308 Buber, Martin, 105, 132, 138, 190 —I & Thou, 105, 138 —Paths in Utopia, 106, 138 —Tales of the Hasidim, 138 Buddha, 138 Buddhism, 107, 113, 114, 144, 158, 190, 191, 192, 265. See also Zen Buddhism —Rexroth on, 137, 138 —Gary Snyder on, 105 —socially engaged Buddhism, 144, 158 Buddhist Peace Fellowship (BPF), 144, 158, 190 —Turning Wheel, 146, 158 Buffet, Bernard, 9 Buffon, Georges, 4 Bugs Moran gang, 137 Bunyan, John, 157 Burckhardt, Jakob, 35 Bureau of Public Secrets, 106, 130, etc. See publications under Knabb bureaucracy, bureaucratic class, 28, 29, 38, 39, 41, 47, 48, 57, 71, 72, 73, 101, 102, 103, 104, 111, 134, 136, 202, 203, 258, etc. See also state capitalism; Stalinism Burgess, Ernest, 15 Burroughs, William, 106, 253, 263 —Naked Lunch, 251 Bush, George, 103, 141 C Caamaño, Francisco, 37 Caesar, Julius, 138 Cahiers du Cinéma, 68 Calas, Nicolas, 7 Calonne, Jacques, 5 calypso music, 308 Cambodia, US invasion of (1970), 251 Camous, Christian, 107, 146 Camus, Albert, 105 Canada: British Columbia phone strike (1981), 103 Le Canard Enchainé, 75 Canjuers, Pierre (Daniel Blanchard), 67 —“Preliminaries Toward Defining a Unitary Revolutionary Program” (w/Debord), 24, 139 Cannon, Gus, 105 Cánovas del Castillo, Antonio, 102 Caos (Mexico), 56 Capital (Marx), 58, 65, 75, 101, 102, 106, 116, 118 capitalism (commodity system), 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 37, 38, 48, 52, 53, 55, 56, 58, 60, 67, 71, 72, 73, 101, 102, 103, 104, 111, 115, 116, 119, 120, 125, 136, 139, 141, 143, 156, 157, 202, 203, 253, 254, 255, 256, 264, 265, etc. See also state capitalism; work. See also separate “Communalism” index. Carco, Francis, 308 Cardan, Paul. See Castoriadis Carles, Trevor, 190 Carli, 75 Carmichael, Stokely, 54, 264 Carmina Burana, 139, 308 Carné, Marcel, 105 Carnegie, Dale, 118 Carolina Tar Heels, 105 Carr, James, 106 Carrión, Tita, 106, 122, 130, 146 —Reich: modo de empleo (translation of Voyer article), 106 —Banalidades de base (translation of Vaneigem article), 106 Carroll, Lewis, 28, 32, 75 —Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, 109 —Silvie & Bruno, 102 Carter Family, 105 Casanova, Giacomo, 137 Cash, Johnny, 308 Castle, Barbara, 56 Castoriadis, Cornelius: —Workers’ Councils & the Economics of a Self-Managed Society, 75, 104 —alias Paul Cardan, 21, 29, 34, 37, 71 —alias Jean-Marc Coudray, 55 Castro, Fidel, 28, 39, 54, 55, 57, 111, 135, 254 Castro-Guevaraism, 52 Catholic Church, Catholicism, 7, 38, 103, 138, 139. See also separate “Communalism” index. Catullus, 137 Caussimon, Jean-Roger, 107 CCE (Council for Conscious Existence), 106 CCPOA (California prison guards union), 104 Céline, Louis-Ferdinand, 105 CEM. See Council for the Eruption of the Marvelous Censor (pseudonym of Gianfranco Sanguinetti) Center for Research on the Social Question. See CRQS Center for Socio-Experimental Art, 36 Cerf, Christopher, 102 CGT (French Communist Party-dominated labor union), 56, 63, 73, 103 Chadwick, David, 107 Chamfort, Sébastien-Roch, 75 Chandler, Raymond, 118, 137 Chang Kuo-hua, 47 Chao Yung-shih, 47 Chaplin, Charlie, 7, 105 character (in Reich’s sense), 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 130, 131, 190, 191, 205. See also roles The Charge of the Light Brigade (film), 75 Charles, Jeanne (pseudonym of Françoise Denevert) Charles, Ray, 308 Chartres cathedral, 104 Chasse, Robert: —The Power of Negative Thinking, or Robin Hood Rides Again, 76, 112, 157, 264 —A Field Study on the Dwindling Force of Cognition (w/Elwell), 76, 114 —“Reply to Murray Bookchin” (w/Elwell), 157 Chastel, Arnaud, 106 Chatel, S., 68 Châtelet, François, 58, 71 Chaucer, Geoffrey 105 Chen Tsai-tao, 47 Cherry, Randall, 76 Chetin, Sara, 205 Cheval, Ferdinand 104 Cheval, Patrick, 56 Chiang Kai-shek (Jiang Jieshi), 47, 134 Chicago Eight, 106, 251 Chicano riot (Los Angeles, 1970), 106, 114, 256 Child ballads (collected by Francis James Child), 308 children, childhood, 101, 102, 104, 105, 137 China, 18, 29, 37, 39, 47, 48, 52, 57, 71, 73, 104, 105, 107, 110, 111, 134, 141, 254 —classic novels, 105, 138, 140 —landscape paintings, 104 —secret societies, 4 —revolution (1925-1927), 47, 52, 73; Shanghai uprising (1927), 47, 71, 134 —bureaucratic Stalinist revolution (1949), 7, 25, 37, 47, 103 —“Cultural Revolution” (1966-1976), 47, 71, 73, 103, 107, 111, 134, 254 —Tiananmen Square movements (1976 & 1989), 103, 104, 134, 158 Chirico, Giorgio de, 2, 3, 118 Chokei, 138 Chombart de Lauwe, Paul Henry, 15 Chomsky, Noam, 102, 157 Chou En-lai (Zhou Enlai), 47, 135 Christ, Jesus, 4, 27, 28, 119, 139, 190, 251 Christian Science Monitor, 102, 103, 104, 107 Christianity, 7, 24, 27, 28, 29, 34, 38, 40, 41, 46, 75, 105, 107, 119, 138, 139, 203, 204, 251, 254. See also separate “Communalism” index. Christie, Stuart, 75 Chronos (England), 76, 107, 157 Chtcheglov, Ivan, 2, 7, 75 —“Formulary for a New Urbanism,” 15, 104 —“Letters from Afar,” 2, 15 Chuang Tze, 138 CIA, 75, 135, 157 The Cid (Corneille), 4 cinema. See film Citizen Kane (Orson Welles film), 50 cities, city planning. See architecture & urbanism civil rights movement, 38, 102, 103, 105, 139, 264 Clark, Ramsey, 107 Clark, Timothy, 62 The Class Struggles in France (Marx), 74 classes, class society, 27, 29, 39, 47, 53, 71, 72, 103, 119, 201, etc. See also hierarchy; bureaucracy; capitalism Claudel, Paul, 41 Clausewitz, Karl von, 47, 55, 75, 145 —On War, 102 Cleaver, Eldridge, 111 Clemenceau, Georges, 4 CLER (French Trotskyist student group), 56 Cleyre, Voltairine de, 139 Clinton, Bill, 104 Club Med, 21, 41, 42, 203 CMDO (Council for Maintaining the Occupations), 55, 56, 63, 73, 75, 103 —“Report on the Occupation of the Sorbonne,” 56 —“For the Power of the Workers Councils,” 56 —“Address to All Workers,” 56, 104 CNRS (French National Center for Scientific Research), 23 CNT (Spanish anarchist labor union), 59, 133, 190 Cobbett, William, 157 Cobra (Experimental Artists’ International), 7, 75, 76 Cocteau, Jean, 7 Cohen, Leonard, 107, 139, 308 Cohn-Bendit, Daniel, 55, 56, 75 —Obsolete Communism: The Left-Wing Alternative (w/Gabriel Cohn-Bendit), 56, 75 COINTELPRO operation (FBI), 105, 106 Cold War, 24, 205 Coleman, Ornette, 137 collectives. See communes & collectives Collette, Rosa, 103 Collins, Judy, 308 colonialism. See Third World Coltrane, John, 107 Comecon, 57 comics, 50, 56, 106, 205 Comintern (Third International), 41, 47, 48, 71, 202 Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal (CSICOP), 107 Committee of 100 (England), 71, 75 commodity system. See capitalism Commoner, Barry, 24 Common Market (European Community), 37 communalist movements, 40, 132, 139. See also separate “Communalism” index. communes & collectives (1960s), 112, 113, 254, 263, 264, 265. See also separate “Communalism” index. communism (in the true sense of the word), 46, 48, 72, 101, 104, 117, 136, 139, 202. See also separate “Communalism” index. Communist League (1847-1852), 74 Communist Manifesto (Marx & Engels), 4, 29, 74, 132, 202 Communist International. See Comintern “Communist” parties, 29, 47, 48, 57, 59, 71, 139, 202, 251, 254. See also Stalinism —Algerian, 39 —American, 157 —Chinese, 47, 73, 134 —Czechoslovakian, 57 —Danish, 50 —French, 48, 55, 57, 71, 73, 75, 101, 103, 139, 191, 203 —German, 59 —Greek, 103 —Indochinese, 48 —Indonesian, 39 —Iranian, 135 —Italian, 47, 56, 57, 103 —Polish, 71, 111, 134 —Russian, 47, 73, 134. See also Bolshevik Party computers, 60, 101, 104, 191 Confucianism, 138 Confucius, 47 Congo, 24, 32, 35, 37, 40 —Katanga region, 29, 37 —Kivu region, 72 Constant (Nieuwenhuis), 5, 7, 16, 31, 34, 71 consumer society. See capitalism consumer strikes, 103 Contemporary Issues (London), 106, 157, 202 —“The Great Utopia,” 157 Contradiction, 75, 106, 112, 113, 114, 129, 130, 131, 146, 190, 205, 250, 257, 262, 263, 264, 265 —“Anti-Anti-Mass,” 114, 262 —“Bureaucratic Comix” (Knabb), 106, 111, 114, 257 —“Critique of the New Left Movement,” 106, 114 —“On the Poverty of Hip Life,” 106, 114, 191 —“An Open Letter to John Zerzan,” 114 —“Still Out of Order” (w/Point-Blank), 114, 205, 262 —“Wildcat Comics,” 114 Cooper, David, 75, 129 Cooperstein, Robert, 106, 122, 130, 146 —The Reproduction of Human Capital (pamphlet on children), 106 Corbière, Tristan, 308 Cornand, Brigitte, 76 Cornuault, Joël, 1, 106, 107, 121, 130, 146 Correspondence (Detroit), 25 Cosséry, Albert, 102 Costa, Xavier, 76 Coudray, Jean Marc. See Castoriadis Council for Conscious Existence (CCE), 106 Council for Maintaining the Occupations. See CMDO Council for the Eruption of the Marvelous (CEM), 106, 114, 130, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254 —“Great Moments in the Void” trading cards (Hammer), 106 —On Wielding the Subversive Scalpel, 106, 114 councilism, 56, 59, 74, 103, 191. See also workers councils councilist organizations, 59 counterculture (1960s), 102, 105, 106, 107, 112, 113, 114, 139, 157, 205, 252, 254, 264, 265, 308. See also youth rebellion. See also separate “Communalism” index. counterfeitism, 106 Country Joe & the Fish, 105, 308 Cournot, Michel, 44 CP. See “Communist” parties CPE (Committee for Participatory Education), 251 Cravan, Arthur, 29 Create Situations (Chastel-Verlaan group), 106, 114, 146 crime & punishment, 101, 102, 104 Critique of Political Economy (Marx’s Capital), 50 Critique of the Gotha Program (Marx), 74 Cromwell, Oliver, 157 Cronin, Isaac, 106, 107, 122, 129, 130, 145, 146, 190, 205, 253. —“The American Situationists: 1972-77,” 106 —“A Critique of ‘On Wielding the Subversive Scalpel’ by One of Its Authors,” 106, 114 —“We’re Tired of Playing With Ourselves” (w/Hammer & Smith), 106, 205 —Implications (w/Shutes), 106, 130 —Call It Sleep (video w/Seltzer), 107, 145 —Money: Myths & Realities (w/Béland), 107 Cros, Charles, 308 CRQS (Center for Research on the Social Question), 106, 107, 121, 130 —Débat d’orientation de l’ex-Internationale Situationniste, 76, 130 —“Declaration Concerning the CRQS,” 106, 130 See other CRQS publications under Denevert CRS (French riot police), 55, 58 Crystal Night (1938), 27 Cuba, 24, 25, 32, 39, 47, 48, 52, 57, 71, 105, 110, 130, 254 cubism, 42 cubist poetry, 137 culture & society, 7, 11, 19, 23, 30, 31, 32, 36, 67, 70, 132, 139. See also art; poetry; counterculture cummings, e.e., 308 CWA (Communication Workers of America), 262 cybernetic welfare state, 27, 28, 112, 264 Czechoslovakia (1968 revolt), 56, 57, 58, 73, 74, 101, 103, 111, 158; Prague, 263 D dadaism, dadaists, 2, 7, 27, 29, 30, 32, 36, 40, 41, 70, 75, 76, 106, 107, 157, 205, 253 Dahou, Mohamed, 7 Daily Californian (Berkeley), 205 Daily Telegraph (London), 75 Dalai Lama, 158 Dalhart, Vernon, 308 Damia, 107 Danger: Official Secret—RSG 6 (Spies for Peace), 70 D’Annunzio, Gabriele, 4 Dante, 137, 138 Darrow, Clarence, 137 Darwin, Charles, 106, 107 De Bello Civili (Thessaloniki), 146 de Gaulle, Charles. See Gaulle, Charles de De Vries, Bernhard, 71 Dean, James, 264, 308 “The Death of J.H.” (metagraph), 4 Debord, Alice (Becker-Ho), 76 Debord, Guy, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 14, 15, 17, 20, 23, 26, 50, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 74, 75, 76, 106, 114, 118, 126, 130, 131, 142, 145, 157, 158, 191, 192 —films, 8, 16, 65, 75, 76, 102, 106, 107, 126, 142, 145, 157 —Comments on the Society of the Spectacle, 101, 102, 145 —“Correspondence with a Cybernetician,” 71 —“Declaration” (w/Riesel & Viénet), 74 —“Directives,” 70 —Hurlements en faveur de Sade (film), 65 —In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni (film), 75, 157 —Mémoires (w/Jorn), 16 —On the Passage of a Few Persons Through a Rather Brief Period of Time (film), 16 —“The Organization Question for the SI,” 74 —“Perspectives for Conscious Changes in Everyday Life,” 107 —Preface to the Fourth Italian Edition of “The Society of the Spectacle,” 103 —“Preliminaries Toward a Defining a Unitary Revolutionary Program” (w/Canjuers), 24, 68, 139 —The Real Split in the International (La véritable scission dans l’Internationale, including Debord & Sanguinetti’s “Theses on the SI & Its Time”), 1, 75, 102, 114, 123, 125, 129, 130, 205 —“Remarks on the SI Today,” 114 —“Report on the Construction of Situations,” 4, 10, 18 —“The Situationists & the New Forms of Action in Politics & Art,” 36 —The Society of the Spectacle (book), 1, 55, 56, 58, 65, 74, 75, 77, 101, 102, 106, 110, 114, 126, 130, 133, 139, 141, 145, 157, 205, 253 —The Society of the Spectacle (film), 65, 75, 126, 145 —“Theory of the Dérive,” 106 —“Theses on the Paris Commune” (w/Kotányi & Vaneigem), 55, 75, 114 —“A User’s Guide to Détournement” (w/Wolman), 16 For more information on Debord’s films & post-SI texts, see the Situationist Bibliography Debordism, 106 Debray, Régis, 157 Debs, Eugene, 102, 137, 140 Decameron (Boccaccio), 105 decentralization, 104 “Declaration of the 121,” 28, 75 Defoe, Daniel, 137 delinquents, 24, 25, 71, 264. See also youth rebellion democracy (direct & participatory as opposed to representative & governmental), 55, 56, 69, 73, 101, 103, 104, 111, 112, 157, 202, 264. See also self-management; workers councils; popular assemblies; electoral politics Denevert, Daniel, 106, 107, 119, 120, 121, 130, 146 —Suggestions relatives au légitime éloge de l’I.S., 106 —“Sur les fonds d’un divorce,” 106, 190 —“Theory of Misery, Misery of Theory,” 106, 125, 126, 130 —“To Clarify Some Aspects of the Moment” (Pour l’intelligence de quelques aspects du moment), 106, 130 Denevert, Daniel & Françoise, 106, 107, 121, 126 —“Un Anti-Denevert,” 130 —Chronique des Secrets Publics, 126, 127, 130 —“Declaration Concerning the CRQS” (w/Bloch & Cornuault), 106, 130 —“Lettres sur l’amitié,” 107 Denevert, Françoise (alias Jeanne Charles), 106, 107, 121, 126, 127, 146 Denmark, 37, 50, 70 dérives, 2, 7, 11, 15, 106, 107, 118. See also psychogeography Descartes, René, 41, 59 “Destruction of RSG-6” demonstration (Denmark), 36, 70 détournement, 4, 11, 16, 18, 22, 28, 32, 36, 40, 41, 42, 50, 58, 70, 75, 106, 107, 114, 118, 125, 142, 145, 151, 157, 253, 263 dialectics, 41, 58, 102, 119, 120, 201. See also revolutionary theory “The Dialectics of Celebrity” (article in a women’s lib paper), 264 Diderot, Denis, 75, 157 —Jacques the Fatalist, 157 Diem, Ngo-dinh, 48 Diggers (English Revolution), 139, 157. See also separate “Communalism” index. Diggers (San Francisco), 105, 112, 113, 264, 265 Dio, Johnny, 18 “Diverse Comments on the Public Activity of the Bay Area ‘Notice Comrades’,” 190 Diversion (Horelick), 106, 130, 190 Dogen, 107 Dohrn, Bernardine, 111 dolce stil nuovo (13th-century Italian poetic school), 32 Dolgoff, Sam, 103 Domenach, Jean-Marie, 46 Domino, Fats, 308 Don Quixote (Cervantes), 105, 137 Donovan, 139, 308 Dooley, Mr. (Finley Dunne character), 105 Doors (rock group), 308 Dorrenbach, H. (revolutionary sailor), 59 Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 105, 138 Dotremont, Christian, 5 Douglass, Frederick, 102, 191 Doyle, Arthur Conan, 118 The Dream of the Red Chamber, 137, 140 Dresden insurrection (1849), 70 Dreyer, Carl, 105 Drouin, Pierre, 12 drugs, 23, 71, 105, 265. See also psychedelics Dubcek, Alexander, 57 Ducasse, Isidore. See Lautréamont Duchamp, Marcel, 4, 41, 70, 137 Dühring, Eugen, 114 Dumontier, Pascal, 76 Duncan, Robert, 105 Dunne, Finley Peter, 105 Dunnington, Greg, 205 Durrell, Lawrence, 105 Durruti, Buenaventura, 28, 102, 103 Durruti Column (Spanish civil war), 28, 49 Dutschke, Rudi, 57 Dylan, Bob, 105, 113, 137, 139, 265, 308 E East Bay Express, 107 East Europe, Eastern bloc, 7, 24, 27, 29, 36, 43, 47, 57, 71, 103, 139, 141, 144. See also Russia; Stalinism Ebert, Friedrich, 59 Eckhart, Meister, 138. See also separate “Communalism” index. ecological & environmental issues, 29, 74, 101, 104, 105, 119, 132, 139, 156, 157, 191, 202, 264. See also technology; architecture & urbanism economic crises, 55, 101 education, 71, 104, 105 Egypt, 48, 52 1844 Manuscripts (Marx), 74, 75 Eisenstein, Sergei, 4, 50, 65 —Potemkin, 75, 103, 145 —Ten Days That Shook the World, 75, 145 Elde, Ansgar, 26 electoral politics, 101, 102 Eliade, Mircea, 27 Eliot, T.S., 137, 157 Elle, 42 Ellington, Duke, 137 Elliott, Jack, 105 Ellul, Jacques: —Autopsy of Revolution, 75 —Propaganda, 29 Elwell, Bruce: —A Field Study in the Dwindling Force of Cognition (w/Chasse), 76, 114 —“Reply to Murray Bookchin” (w/Chasse) 157 Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 118 Emison, Grant, 190 Encyclopaedia Britannica, 137 Encyclopédistes, 28, 41, 71 “The End of Prehistory” (radio program), 129 Engels, Frederick (Knabb pseudonym), 114, 253 Engels, Friedrich, 69, 75, 104, 107, 116, 125, 129, 201, 202, 264 —Anti-Dühring, 114 —Communist Manifesto (w/Marx), 4, 29, 74, 132, 202 —The German Ideology (w/Marx), 114 —Introduction to Marx’s Class Struggles in France, 74 England, Great Britain, 9, 21, 27, 38, 49, 62, 71, 129, 202, 254 —process of “primitive accumulation,” 101 —Revolution (1640-1660), 40, 139, 157. See also separate “Communalism” index. —Mandate over Palestine (1920-1948), 48 —Spies for Peace scandal (1963), 70, 71, 102 —Rhodesian crisis (1965), 38 —labor government, 38, 56, 71 —youth rebellion, 9, 71 —wildcat strikes, 37, 56, 71 Enragés (1793), 27, 40 Enragés (1968), 55, 56, 58, 73, 75, 102, 103, 129 Enragés & Situationists in the Occupations Movement. See under Viénet Enragés-Situationist International Committee, 56, 73 Epimenides, 48 Erostratus, 27 Estes, Sleepy John, 105 Étiemble, René, 56 Eva (French singer), 308 Everson, William, 105 everyday life, 23, 27, 28, 130, 251, 252, etc. See also leisure; survival existentialism, existentialists, 7, 9, 18, 71, 105, 138 Experimental Artists’ International (Cobra), 7 Extraphile (Virginia), 146 F FAI (Iberian Anarchist Federation), 59, 74, 264 Faisal (king of Saudi Arabia), 48 Falangists (Spanish fascists), 37 fallout shelters, 24 Fanonism, 52 Fariña, Mimi & Richard, 308 Farmers Confederation (France), 156 fascism, 7, 27, 28, 29, 39, 40, 59, 101, 112, 139, 202, 264 Faupel, Wilhelm von, 103 FBI, 18, 105 Feltrinelli, Giangiacomo, 56 FER (French Trotskyist student group), 73 Ferlinghetti, Lawrence, 105, 308 Fernandel, 68 Ferré, Léo, 107, 308 feudalism, 27, 28, 41, 102. See also separate “Communalism” index. Feuerbach, Ludwig, 37 —Principles of the Philosophy of the Future, 118 FGEL (French Federation of Liberal Arts Groups), 71 Fields, W.C., 105, 137 Fifth Estate (Detroit), 146, 191, 192 Figaro (Paris), 4 Figaro Littéraire (Paris), 75 film, 4, 7, 8, 42, 50, 65, 68, 102, 105, 141, 142, 145. See also Debord: films Fine, Sidney, 103 First International (International Working Men’s Association), 25, 35 Fitzgerald, Ella, 308 FLN (Algerian National Liberation Front), 39 Flaubert, Gustave, 105 Flint, Michigan, sitdown strike (1937), 103 Florence, 104 folk music, 105, 107, 139, 308 Folkways Records, 308 Fonda, Jane, 264 For Ourselves (Berkeley), 75 For Whom the Bell Tolls (film), 75, 145 Ford, Ford Madox, 107, 138, 157 —Parade’s End, 105, 138 Ford, Simon, 76 Forsyth, Lucy, 76, 157 Foster, Nelson, 190 Fougeyrollas, Pierre, 25 Fourier, Charles, 28, 32, 40, 51, 60, 71, 104, 106, 118, 125, 158. See also separate “Communalism” index. —Notice to the Civilized Concerning the Next Social Metamorphosis, 60 Fourth International (Trotskyist), 71, 75 Fourth World Manifesto, 112, 264 France, 9, 24, 25, 71, 106. See also Paris —Fronde (1648-1653), 40 —revolution (1789-1793), 4, 21, 69, 117, 156, 204; Bastille (1789), 117; Parisian sections, 264; Enragés (1793), 40 —revolution (1848), 55, 69 —Franco-German war (1870-1871), 103 —Paris Commune (1871), 25, 27, 36, 39, 55, 59, 69, 71, 75, 101, 103, 119, 137, 156 —avant-garde movements (ca. 1918-1957), 7 —first Vietnam war (1946-1954), 48 —Algerian war (1954-1962), 5, 28, 39, 48 —Strasbourg scandal (1966), 49, 55, 56, 58, 75, 102, 103, 253 —May 1968 revolt, 55, 56, 58, 60, 63, 66, 73, 75, 101, 102, 103, 106, 120, 123, 125, 129, 139, 156, 203, 308, etc. See more detailed listing under May 1968 revolt —Lip company takeover (1973), 75, 103, 119, 129 —jobless revolt (1998), 156, 158 Franco, Francisco, 36, 37, 38, 55, 56, 70, 101, 103, 205 Frankfort School, 190 Franklin, H. Bruce, 205 fraternization, 103 Free Speech Movement. See FSM Freedom (London), 75 Freeman, Jo, 104 Fréhel, 107 French Socialist Party, 156 French songs, 107, 139, 308 The French Student Uprising (ed. Schnapp & Vidal-Naquet), 63, 75 Frères Jacques, 308 Freud, Sigmund, 7, 37, 40, 116, 191 Freudian psychology, 7, 10, 58. See also psychoanalysis Frey, Théo, 49 FSM (Berkeley Free Speech Movement), 37, 38, 71, 72, 103, 105, 112, 205, 254, 264 Fullerton, John, 76 functionalism, 7, 10, 24 Fusion, 75 futurism, 7 G Gagarin, Yuri, 29, 61 Galileo Galilei, 61 Gallizio, Giuseppe Pinot, 5, 14, 16 Gandhi, Mohandas, 132, 158 Gandhiism, 71, 132 gangs. See delinquents gangsters, 18 Garaudy, Roger, 42, 71 García Oliver, Juan, 59 Gardner, Martin, 107 Garnault, Jean, 49 Garnautins (Frey, Garnault & Holl), 49, 51, 62, 66 Gauguin, Paul, 70 Gaulle, Charles de, 28, 55, 56, 71, 73, 75, 102, 103, 105, 139 Gaullism, de Gaulle regime, 25, 48, 55, 56, 71, 73 Gaussen, Frédéric, 55 Gayraud, Joël, 76 Geismar, Alain (Maoist leader of SNESup), 55 The German Ideology (Marx & Engels), 46, 50, 74, 114 German Social Democracy, 57, 59, 71 Germany, 20, 24, 31, 48, 102, 141, 157, 202 —revolution (1918-1919), 25, 59, 101, 102, 103, 139; Kiel mutiny (1918), 32, 71; Spartakist insurrection (1919), 40, 41, 55, 59, 71 —East Berlin workers’ uprising (1953), 71 —West Berlin student movement (1960s), 48, 49 Getz, Stan, 308 Gibbon, Edward, 107 Gibson, Morgan, 190 —Revolutionary Rexroth: Poet of East-West Wisdom, 140, 300 Gide, André, 7, 41 Gifford, Kathie Lee, 191, 192 Giles-Peters, A.R., 201 Gilgamesh, 137 Ginsberg, Allen, 105, 108, 113, 139, 264, 265, 308 —Howl, 137 Gitlin, Todd, 75, 157 —The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage, 157 —The Twilight of Common Dreams: Why America Is Wracked by Culture Wars, 157 —The Whole World Is Watching: Mass Media in the Making & Unmaking of the New Left, 157 giveaway strikes, 60, 103 Glucksmann, André, 55 Gnostics, 138 God, 9, 23, 27, 28, 29, 41, 61, 71, 105, 107, 138, 157, 190, 203 God Speaks Through Me (Illinois), 146 Godard, Jean-Luc, 42, 49, 50, 65, 68, 71, 75, 106, 203, 251 —Breathless, 68 —The Gay Science, 65 —Love, 65 Goines, David Lance, 103 The Golden Ass (Apuleius), 105 Goldman, Emma, 105, 137, 139, 158 Goldner, Loren, 75, 129 Gombin, Richard, 75, 129 —Le projet révolutionnaire, 63 Gomulka, Wladyslaw, 57 Gonzalvez, Shigenobu, 76 The Good Soldier Svejk (Hasek), 102 Good Times (San Francisco), 262 Goodman, Paul, 102, 104, 107, 158, 191 —Communitas (w/Percival Goodman), 104 —“On a Writer’s Block,” 114 —People or Personnel, 104 Goodwin, Archie (Rex Stout character), 107 Gorz, André, 25 Gospels, 138 Gotha Program, 74, 125 graffiti, 50, 131, 156 —May 1968, 55, 56, 73, 75, 102, 111, 203 Graham, Billy, 190, 251 Gramsci, Antonio, 29, 37, 59 Grappin, Pierre, 56 Grateful Dead, 105 Gray, Christopher, 62 —King Mob, 62 —Leaving the Twentieth Century, 1, 75, 76, 107, 129, 146, 190 GRCA (Groupe Révolutionnaire Conseilliste d’Agitations — French situ group), 74 Great Leap Forward (China, 1958), 47 Greco, Juliette, 308 Greece, 264 —Athens (ancient), 104, 128, 137, 191, 264 Greek Communist Party, 103 Greek philosophers, 104, 128 Greek tragedies, 137 Green, Allan, 62 Greene, Robert, 76 Grégoire, Roger, 103, 106 —“To Readers of Black & Red” (w/Lanphear), 106 —Worker-Student Action Committees: France May ’68 (w/Perlman), 55, 103, 106 “Grenelle Accords,” 55 Griffith, D.W., 4 Gropius, Walter, 6 Groueff, Stéphane, 18 Group for Research on Everyday Life, 23 Grove Press, 75 Guérin, Daniel, 45, 54 Guerrilla Art, 130 Guevara, Che, 39, 48, 105, 251, 253 Guevaraism, 52, 60, 106, 134 Guiducci, Roberto, 29 Guigné, Joël, 146 Guilbert, Cécile, 76 Guilbert, Yvette, 308 Guillain, Robert, 29 Guitry, Sacha, 4 Gulf war (1991), 103, 107, 141, 190 Guthrie, Arlo, 308 Guthrie, Woody, 105, 308 Gutierrez, Donald, 140, 300 Gut-Rage (Enragés leaflet), 56 H Hadj, Messali, 39 Hahn, Thich Nhat, 107, 144, 158 Hahnel, Robin, 104 Haight-Ashbury, 105, 113, 265 Halle, Adam de la, 308 Hallyday, Johnny, 71 Hamalian, Linda, 140, 157, 300 Hamill, Sam 300 Hammer, Dan, 1, 106, 122, 130, 146, 205, 252 —“Great Moments in the Void” trading cards, 106 Hammett, Dashiel, 137 —The Maltese Falcon, 106 happenings, 30, 71, 110, 139 Harbi, Mohammed, 39, 45 Hardy, Françoise, 308 Harikrishnas, 252, 263 Haruki, Tommy, 106, 107, 130, 146 Hashimoto, Yoshiharu, 190 Hasidism, 138 Haussmann, Georges-Eugène, 3, 24 Havrenne, Marcel, 27 Hawking, Stephen, 104 Hayden, Tom, 111, 264 health care, 104 Heatwave (England), 71 Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich, 23, 24, 28, 29, 37, 41, 43, 46, 52, 55, 57, 58, 70, 71, 74, 75, 102, 106, 116, 117, 130, 131, 157, 201 —The Phenomenology of Spirit, 56, 102, 118, 190 Heidegger, Martin, 34 Heine, Heinrich, 157 Hell’s Angels, 264 Heraclitus, 128, 203 Herald Tribune, 24, 38 Hermetic Books, 138 Herodotus, 137 Herzl, Theodor, 48 Hesse, Hermann, 104, 105 —The Glass Bead Game (Magister Ludi), 107 hierarchy, hierarchical power, 27, 28, 29, 38, 53, 71, 72, 101, 102, 103, 104, 111, 119, 136, 143, 251, 253, etc. See also classes; capitalism High Life music, 308 Hill, Christopher, 157 —The Law of Freedom & Other Writings of Gerrard Winstanley, 157 —The World Turned Upside Down: Radical Ideas in the English Revolution, 157 Hill, Joe, 308 Histadrut (Federation of Jewish Labor), 48 hippies. See counterculture Hitler, Adolph, 102, 116, 141, 201 Hitler-Stalin Pact (1939-1941), 48, 139 “Hitler-Trotskyists,” 41 Hitomaro, 137 Ho Chi Minh, 48, 111, 300 hobbies, 12, 104 Hoffman, Abbie, 112, 264 Hoffman, Allan, 62 Hofstätter, Peter R., 18 Hofuku, 138 Holiday, Billie, 308 Hollon, Bobbi, 38 Hollywood, 38, 143 Holmes, Sherlock (Conan Doyle character), 118 Home, Stewart, 76, 192 homelessness. See housing; rent strikes Homer, 105, 107, 137, 138, 140 Hong Kong, 48, 107, 134, 190 Horelick, Jon, 106 House, Son, 105 housing, 104. See also architecture & urbanism How To Develop Self-Confidence & Influence People by Public Speaking (Carnegie), 118 HUAC (House Un-American Activities Committee), 253 Hughes, Langston, 308 Human Behavior, 130 humanism, 27, 38, 71 Humanité (French Communist Party paper), 23, 75 humor: —Rexroth on, 137 —as radical tactic, 102 Humphrey, Hubert H., 48 Humpty Dumpty, 32 Hung, General, 47 Hungarian revolution (1956), 5, 37, 39, 44, 55, 57, 59, 101, 103, 104, 105, 110, 111, 135, 145, 157, 158, 253, 256, 257; Budapest workers councils, 36, 59, 71, 73 Husák, Gustáv, 57 Hussein (king of Jordan), 48 Hussein, Saddam, 103, 141 Hutchins, Robert M., 105 Hutterites, 139. See also separate “Communalism” index. Huxley, Aldous, 105 —The Perennial Philosophy, 104 —Island, 107 I I Ching, 113, 265 Iberian Anarchist Federation (FAI), 59, 74 ICO (Informations, Correspondance Ouvrières — French ultraleftist newsletter/group), 55, 59, 71, 74, 114 iconoclasts, 27 ideology (as opposed to theory), 25, 28, 29, 35, 37, 41, 44, 47, 51, 53, 59, 71, 72, 102, 104, 106, 118, 119, 125, 136, 192, 254, 264, etc. See also revolutionary theory Imrie, Malcolm, 76 Ince, Thomas, 50 India, 47, 52 Indonesia, 39, 47 Industrial Revolution, 38, 101, 104, 143, 192, 202 INEB (International Network of Engaged Buddhists), 158 Informations, Correspondance Ouvrières. See ICO INSA (French National Institute of Applied Sciences), 55 intelligentsia, 28, 29 International Communist Current, 107 International Correspondence (Hong Kong), 190 International Monetary Fund (IMF), 104 International Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus, 5, 6, 7, 76 —Eristica, 5 International Socialists, 262 International Working Men’s Association (First International), 25, 35 Internationale Situationniste. See Situationist International internationalism, 37, 48, 55, 73, 103 Internationalism Bulletin (New York), 75 Internationals, 40 —First (International Working Men’s Association), 25, 35 —Second (Socialist), 57, 71, 202 —Third (Communist, Comintern), 41, 47, 48, 71, 202 —Fourth (Trotskyist), 71, 75 Internet, 104, 191 Ionesco, Eugène, 137 IPN (National Pedagogical Institute), 55, 56 Irak: les révoltes inconnues (Montreal), 146 Iran (1979 revolution), 103, 107, 135, 190 Iraq, 48 —Baghdad comrades (1959), 37 —Gulf war (1991), 103, 107, 141, 190 I.S. (Internationale Situationniste). See Situationist International Isaacs, Harold, 47, 134 Islam, 37, 39, 40, 103, 107, 204. See also separate “Communalism” index. Isou, Jean-Isidore, 7, 36, 75 Israel, 37, 48, 135, 138 It Ain’t Me Babe (women’s lib paper), 253 Italian Anarchist Federation, 75, 123 Italian Anarchist Union, 59 Italian Socialist Party, 59 Italy, 7, 25, 57, 59, 102 —1920 revolution, 59, 101; Turin councils movement, 39, 59, 71, 73 —1968-1969 wildcat struggles, 56, 72 Ivain, Gilles (pseudonym of Ivan Chtcheglov) IWW (Industrial Workers of the World) (“Wobblies”), 102, 137, 139, 157, 204, 308 —Little Red Song Book, 308 Izvestia (Moscow), 47, 48 J Jacks, L.P., 204 Jackson, Jonathan, 264 Jacobinism, 69, 201 Jacobs, David, 76, 190, 205 Jacopetti, Gualtierro, 65 jacqueries (violent peasant revolts), 27, 36, 40. See also separate “Communalism” index. Jambu, Jeanne. See Smith, Jeanne James, Henry, 138, 139, 157 Japan, 7, 9, 48, 56, 71, 102, 106, 107, 130, 202 —anarchists, 107, 130, 133, 190 —Sanrizuka occupation (1970s), 103, 133 —Stalinism, 47 —Zengakuren, 35, 37, 71, 73 Jappe, Anselm, 76 Jarry, Alfred, 28, 308 jazz, 308 jazz poetry, 137 JCR (Revolutionary Communist Youth — French Trotskyist group), 55, 56, 71, 73 Jefferson, Blind Lemon, 105 Jefferson Airplane, 308 John of the Cross, St., 138, 190 Johnny Guitar (Nicolas Ray film), 75, 145 Johnson, Richard, 75 Johnson, Robert, 105 Johnson, Samuel, 138 Jones, Jim, 190 Jones, Ken, 158 Jones, LeRoi, 308 Jong, Jacqueline de, 20, 26 Jordan, 48 Jorn, Asger, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14, 20, 75, 76 —Detourned Painting, 16 —Mémoires (w/Debord), 16, 76 —alias George Keller, 25 Jospin, Lionel, 156 Journey Through Utopia (Berneri), 104 Joyce, James, 32, 40, 41, 105 —Finnegans Wake, 105 Judaism, 48, 138 Judas Iscariot, 190 Judd, Alan, 157 June 19th Declaration (accompanying Boumédienne’s coup), 37, 39 Jung, Carl, 138 K Kabbalism, 138 Kádár, János, 57 Kalevala (Lönnrot), 105, 137 Kamenev, Lev, 59 Kandel, Lenore, 308 KAPD (German Communist Workers Party), 59 Karol, K.S., 47 Kassem, Abd-ul-Karim, 48 Katanga (region of Congo), 29, 37 “Katangans” (France, May 1968), 55 KAUD (German Communist Workers Union), 59 Kaupp, Katia, 44 Kautsky, Karl, 104, 201 —The Social Revolution, 59 Keaton, Buster, 105 Keller, George (pseudonym of Asger Jorn) Kellner, Douglas, 201 Kennedy, John F., 24 Kerensky, Alexander, 55, 73 Kerouac, Jack, 105, 138, 139 —The Dharma Bums, 105 —On the Road, 137 Kesey, Ken, 105, 113, 265 Khatib, Abdelhafid, 7, 14 Khayati, Mustapha, 41, 49, 52, 74, 75, 103 Khomeini, Ayatollah, 103, 107, 135 Khomeiniists, 103, 107 Khrushchev, Nikita, 44, 47, 71 Khrushchevo-Brezhnevists, 39 kibbutzes, 48, 104, 138 Kiel mutiny (Germany, 1918), 32, 71 Kierkegaard, Soren, 40, 105, 138, 157 —Concluding Unscientific Postscript, 118 —The Sickness Unto Death, 205 King, Martin Luther, Jr., 38, 105, 132, 158 King Mob (Australia), 146 King Mob (England), 62 The Kings Depart: Versailles & the German Revolution (Watt), 103 Kipling, Rudyard, 138 Kivu (region of Congo), 72 Kleiner, Elaine Laura, 300 Klossowski, Pierre, 41 Knabb, Ken, 105, 106, 107, 114, 130, 131, 146, 190, 191, etc. —“Affective Détournement: A Case Study,” 106, 190 —“The Blind Men & the Elephant,” 76, 107, 129, 157, 190 —Bureau of Public Secrets #1, 1, 106, 124, 190 —Bureau Prehistory, 130, 250 —“Bureaucratic Comix,” 106, 114, 257 —“Confessions of a Mild-Mannered Enemy of the State” (autobiography), 107, 191, 192 —“Do We Need Snyder for Poet-Priest?” 106 —Double-Reflection, 106, 107, 129, 190 —“Hello, men!” balloon, 106 —“How Not To Translate Situationist Texts,” 76 —“In This Theater...,” 106 —“The Joy of Revolution,” 107, 155, 156, 158, 191, 192 —“Notice Concerning the Reigning Society” (w/Carrión, Cooperstein, Cronin, Hammer, Rosenberg & Shutes), 106, 107, 130, 190 —“Ode on the Absence of Real Poetry Here This Afternoon,” 106 —“Open Letter to the Tokyo ‘Libertaire’ Group,” 107 —“The Opening in Iran,” 107, 190 —“Paris Spleen,” 107 —Public Secrets, 153, 191, 192 —“A Radical Group in Hong Kong,” 107, 190 —The Realization & Suppression of Religion, 106, 107, 190, 191, 192 —“Reich: How To Use” (comic poster), 106 —The Relevance of Rexroth, 107, 190 —Remarks on Contradiction & Its Failure, 106, 130, 131, 205 —“Remarques sur le style de Double-Reflection,” 130 —Situationist International Anthology, 1, 107, 190, 191, etc. See complete listing under Situationist International —“The Society of Situationism,” 106, 107 —“Special Investigator” business card, 106 —“Strong Lessons for Engaged Buddhists,” 158, 190 —“The War & the Spectacle” (Gulf war leaflet), 107, 190, 191, 204 —“What Subversion Really Is” (alias Frederick Engels), 114 “Knabbists,” 130, 190 Knapp, Gregory, 300 Koran, 37 Korea, North, 105, 111 Korea, South, 158 —public-participation newspaper strike, 103 Korsch, Karl, 106, 119, 201 —“On an Activistic Form of Materialism & on the Class & Partisan Character of Science,” 201 —“Theses on Hegel & Revolution,” 201 Korun, Walter, 14 Kosygin, Alexei, 47, 57 Kotányi, Attila, 20, 26, 51, 74 —“Basic Program of the Bureau of Unitary Urbanism” (w/Vaneigem), 24, 69 —“Theses on the Paris Commune” (w/Debord & Vaneigem), 55, 75, 114 Kotik, Jan, 5 KPD (German Communist Party), 59 KPFA (Berkeley noncommercial radio station), 137, 139, 308 Kravetz, Marc, 55, 71 Krivine, Alain (JCR leader), 55 Kronstadt revolt (1921), 25, 27, 32, 40, 55, 59, 71, 73, 101, 105, 110, 111, 137, 139, 253, 256, 257 Kropotkin, Piotr, 59, 105, 133, 138, 139, 158, 190 Ku Klux Klan, 4 Kunzelmann, Dieter, 26 Kuo Min Tang (Guomindang), 47, 139 Kurds, 37, 103, 135 Kuron, Jacek, 71, 111, 134 Kwok, K.C., 134 http://www.slip.net/~knabb/index1.htm


    3510 -- Anarchy in Kansas: Moses Harman, Lucifer, the Light-Bearer, Clarence Lee Swartz, Lois Nichols Waisbrooker, Charles T Fowler, Gaspar C. Clemens, Victor Yarros http://world.std.com/~bbrigade/anarchy%20in%20kansas%20%231


    3510 -- With this personalism is connected a primordial anarchistic element in my world- outlook, which separated me off from other Russian thinkers of the XX Century, & separated me off also from the Marxists......

    Khomyakov was uniquely original as an anarchist in contrast with Vl. Solov'ev & this also made him characteristically a Russian thinker. K. Leont'ev sensed the modernist & reformist character of the ideas of Khomyakov, he saw in them elements, detestable to him, of liberalism, democratism, humanism.

    Nikolai Berdyaev 1874 - 1948 http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/Philosophy/Sui-Generis/Berdyaev/essays/rsr.htm


    3511 -- Poetry of Voltairine de Cleyre & Thou Too The Hurricane At the Grave in Waldheim The Dirge of the Sea I Am Love's Ghost Life or Death The Toast of Despair Mary Wollstonecraft John P. Altegeld The Feast of Vultures The Suicide's Defense Germinal The Road Builders Ave et Vale Marsh-Bloom "Light Upon Waldheim" Written-In-Red page originally online from Liberated Existence, no longer as of 2003 Denny Henke http://recollectionbooks.com/bleed/Encyclopedia/Decleyre/poetrydecleyre.htm


    3519 -- BOOKCHIN, MURRAY Communalism: the democratic dimension of anarchism Bookchin M. Democracy & Nature. Vol 3 Issue 2. 95. Page 1-17. Democracy is not a form of 'rule' but the direct management of society in face-to-face assemblies. This means that consensus decision making, in fact, represents the individualistic alternative to democracy, & it presupposes a kind of uniformity and psychological homogeneity which rules out the individual diversity that constitutes the basis of a free society. Democracy is the political dimension of anarchism, & communalism is the politics that is engaged in in the process of creating active citizens and genuine communities related to each other through confederations that could ultimately challenge the existence of the state.


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    3519 -- The Anarcho-Statists of Spain: An Historical, Economic, & Philosophical Analysis of Spanish Anarchism by Bryan Caplan In the spirit of F.A. Hayek's The Road to Serfdom , I dedicate this essay to anarcho-socialists of all factions. Preface In "Looking Back on the Spanish War," George Orwell writes, "I have little direct evidence about the atrocities in the Spanish civil war. I know that some were committed by the Republicans, & far more (they are still continuing) by the Fascists. But what impressed me then, & has impressed me ever since, is that atrocities are believed in or disbelieved in solely on grounds of political predilection. Everyone believes in the atrocities of the enemy and disbelieves in those of his own side, without ever bothering to examine the evidence." The same remark applies with equal force to much of the recent debate about the behavior of the Spanish Anarchists during the Spanish Civil War. Seeing that it was very difficult to unravel the truth behind the conflicting accounts & citations, I decided to look at the evidence for myself. The following essay is the product of my investigations. Quotations may sometimes seem overlong, because I avoided cutting them whenever possible to eliminate any suspicion of creative editing. --Bryan Caplan "Suffer no man & no cause to escape the undying penalty which history has the power to inflict on wrong." --Lord Acton, "The Study of History" If you would like to volunteer to translate this essay into Spanish, please e-mail me at bdcaplan@princeton.edu. 1. Introduction The Spanish fascists used barbaric methods throughout the Spanish Civil War in order to establish a brutal dictatorship.[1] The Spanish Communists used similar wartime measures in their failed effort to give birth to an even more totalitarian regime.[2] But many discussions of the Spanish Civil War overlook, minimize, or apologize for the atrocious behavior and tyrannical aspirations of perhaps the most powerful faction of the Spanish Republicans: the Anarchist movement. The present essay aims to redress the balance. It first summarizes the historical details of the Anarchists' behavior during the Spanish Civil War, scrutinizing both the behavior of the upper echelons of the Anarchist movement as well as the rank-and-file militants. The essay then examines the economics of Anarchist-controlled Spain, focusing on both the policies adopted, their aims, & the results. I conclude with a philosophical dissection of the Spanish Anarchist movement, showing that their horrific behavior was largely the result of their incoherent view of human freedom, their unsuccessful attempt to synthesize socialism & liberty, & their uncritical & emotional way of thinking. http://www.gmu.edu/departments/economics/bcaplan/spain.htm


    3519 -- ARCHIVE: REVIEW THE FRIENDS OF DURRUTI GROUP 1937-1939, Author Agustin Guillamon, Translated by Paul Sharkey This 114 page book examines the role of the Friends of Durruti, a small group of militants from the Durruti column who were involved in the events of May 1937 - a civil war within a civil war on the streets of Barcelona. The Friends of Durruti were simultaneously embraced by the Trotskyist Movement and ostracised by the Spanish Anarcho-Syndicalist Movement. Reading the book gave me an insight into their goals & methods. By May 1937, the anarchists were on the retreat. The struggle for the Social Revolution had been replaced by the Civil War. The militia's had almost been incorporated into a regular army. The collectives had not reached their full potential. The Republican government had four Anarchist Ministers. The joy of the 19th July, 1936 had been replaced by a grinding civil war. The Friends of Durruti group witnessed first hand the evaporation of the anarchist victories. They questioned the Anarchist strategies of the C.N.T./F.A.I. they despaired that at the very moment the Anarchist Movement could have abolished the state, they resuscitated it. After fifty years of agitation & organisation the anarchist movement was not able to take the final step & abolish the state. The collectives became part of the state apparatus. Capitalism survived. Reading & re-reading this book I'm not convinced by the Friends of Durruti's assertion that May 1937 was a failure "because the workers failed to come up with a revolutionary leadership". I accept their criticism that the C.N.T./F.A.I. policies snatched defeat from the jaws of victory but not that revolutions are inherently authoritarian. Those readers who believe that "revolutions without theory fail to make progress" would benefit from reading this book. The Friends of Durruti Group 1937-1939. Published by AK Press1996 ISBN1873176-54-6


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    3519 -- Revolt on the Clyde Silkscreen. Height: 35.5 cm Width: 25.4 cm. Scotland, 1984. Prolific publishers of posters, the Clydeside Anarchists used the medium as a means of communicating their views. They also produced a number of smaller posters which were used to inform their community of upcoming public meetings and events. In this example, the poster shows a picture of a bus being overturned in the Glasgow General Strike of 1919. The title reads "How it was...How it must be again!"


    3519 -- Jack London was not the only one who condemned while praising. There were others, even in our own ranks, among them S. Yanofsky, the editor of the Freie Arbeiter Stimme. He was one of the speakers at the banquet given to celebrate the appearance of Sasha's book. He was the only one of the five hundred guests who interjected a discordant note into the otherwise beautifully harmonious evening. Yanofsky paid high tribute to Sasha's Memoirs as the "mature product of a mature mind," but he "regretted the useless & futile act of a silly boy." I felt outraged by the man's denouncing the Attentat on the occasion of the birth of Sasha's book, a work conceived in that heroic moment of July 1892 and nourished by tears & blood throughout the dark & terrible years that followed. When I was called upon to speak, I turned upon the man who presumed to represent a great ideal & yet who was lacking in the least understanding of one so truly the idealist. "To you the impressionable youth of Alexander Berkman appears silly," I said, "and his Attentat futile. You are by no means the first to take such a stand towards the idealist whose humanity can tolerate no injustice & endure no wrong. From time immemorial the wise & practical have denounced every heroic spirit. Yet it has not been they who have influenced our lives. The idealists and visionaries, foolish enough to throw caution to the winds & express their ardour & faith in some supreme deed, have advanced mankind & have enriched the world. The one whose work we are here to celebrate happens to be such a futile visionary. His act was the protest of a sensitive spirit that would rather perish for his ideal than continue for a lifetime as a smug inhabitant of a complaisant & callous world. If our comrade did not perish, it was certainly not due to the mercy of those who had openly declared he should not survive his living grave. It was due entirely to the same traits that inspired Alexander Berkman's act: his unwavering purpose, his indomitable will, & his faith in the ultimate triumph of his ideal. These elements have gone into the making of the 'silly' youth, into his act & into his martyrdom of fourteen years. It is these same elements that have inspired the creation of Prison Memoirs. Whatever greatness and humanity the book possesses, they are woven of these elements. There is no gap between the silly youth & the mature man. There is a continuous flow, a red thread that winds like a leitmotif throughout the entire life of Alexander Berkman." http://www.havocrex.com/column1.html


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    3520 -- Kiril Kadiiski was born in the city of Kjustendil in 1947. A poet, an essayist & translator of poetry, he is standing outside the officially imposed criteria for literature, one of the founders of the Bulgarian "Samizdat" (which means "Selfpublishing") and the first private publisher in Bulgaria (Nov Zlatorog paper). He has translated a number of French & Russian poets among which are Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Mallarme, Apolinaire,Tutchev, Block, Voloshin, Pasternak. http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hangar/9556/index2.htm


    4001 -- archive Year Event Location 1997 Sea of Japan Oil Spill Japan A Russian oil tanker breaks in two in the Sea of Japan, spilling 1.2 million gallons of fuel oil. 1996 Milford Haven Oil Spill South-west Wales The Sea Empress, a Liberian oil tanker operated by a Russian crew, ran aground on rocks off St. Ann's Head in the entrance channel to Milford Haven, spilling thousands of tons of crude oil. 1991 Persian Gulf War oil spills Kuwait, Sea Island Terminal Saddam Hussein ordered the release of oil from the Sea Island Terminal, the Mina al-Bakr terminal, & several AL-Ahmadi tankers. Although the size of the spill is disputed (it could be anywhere from 70,000 tons to 600,000 tons), it has been called one of the largest oil spills in history. In addition to other damage, over 20,000 seabirds were killed. 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill USA, AK, Prince William Sound Exxon Valdez ran aground 25 miles off Valdez, Alaska, spilling over 11 million gallons (37,000 tons) of oil into Prince William Sound & causing the worst oil spill in American history. Hundreds of miles of Alaskan shoreline were contaminated, & hundreds of animals, 50,000 birds & an uncountable number of fish were killed. 1988 Bangladesh floods Bangladesh Due to overpopulation, deforestation & poverty, the rivers Ganges and Brahmaputra flood annually. This has resulted in erosion & the loss of thousands of lives, as well as many other environmental problems. 1986 Chernobyl meltdown Ukraine Due to human error during a series of tests, a nuclear reactor became unstable & went out of control. The result was by far the worst single event in the history of the world's nuclear power industry. Hundreds of people died immediately & thousands were seriously affected by the radioactive fallout. 1986 Sandoz chemical spill Switzerland, Basel, Rhine river A fire at Sandoz AG's warehouse 956, on the Rhine river, caused a massive leak of contaminated water into the Rhine. Contaminants included 840 tons of insecticides, mercury, & other toxins. The spill caused a water-use crisis within the heavily populated area & resulted in the death of over 500,000 fish. 1984 Bhopal disaster India, Bhopal A Union Carbide pesticide producing plant leaked a cloud of highly toxic chemicals over the densely populated city of Bhopal causing thousands of deaths. 1983 Iran-Iraq oil spill Iran, Nowruz offshore oil field & Khargo Island oil facility The blowout of a well in Iran's Nowruz oil field prompted an Iraqi air & sea attack which damaged more nearby wells as well as the Khargo Island oil facility. During February, March & April, more than 225,000 barrels of oil were either burnt or spilled into the gulf. It was the worst oil spill in the history of the Persian Gulf. 1983 Times Beach Evacuation USA, MO, Times Beach A small Missouri town was forced to shut down due to contamination by the highly toxic chemical, Dioxin. 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear accident USA, PA, Harrisburg, Three Mile Island A series of human errors & equipment failures caused one of the two reactors at this nuclear plant to overheat leading to a partial meltdown. The accident came close to causing a massive explosion & nuclear disaster similar to what occurred at Chernobyl in 1986. 1978 Amoco Cadiz oil spill France, Brittany, Portsall The supertanker, Amoco Cadiz, ran aground during a storm. The ship lost its entire cargo of 226,000 tons of crude oil which spilled into the Atlantic Ocean. Amoco was ordered to pay $85 million in damages. 1978 Love Canal evacuation USA, NY, Niagara Falls From 1942 to 1953, the Hooker Chemical Company dumped approximately 22,000 tons of toxic chemical waste into Love Canal at Niagara Falls. Schools & homes built on the site at a later date had to be evacuated in 1978. After a decade of clean-up, the government declared the area safe for reoccupancy. The area, still considered unsafe by many environmentalists, has been renamed Black Creek Village. 1972 Buffalo Creek Disaster USA, WV, Buffalo Creek Valley More than 125 people were killed & thousands more were left homeless when a coal company's refuse pile dam collapsed, dumping millions of gallons of water & waste materials on sixteen small communities in the mountains of West Virginia. 1945 Hiroshima & Nagasaki atomic bomb attacks Japan, Hiroshima The U.S.A. dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima instantly killing 80,000 people, & eventually killing another 125,000, due to radiation & cancer. Two days after Hiroshima, a similar bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. This time, 70,000 people were immediately killed & another 100,000 died in following years. Environmental Disaster Timeline



    http://www.earthbase.org/home/timeline/indexb.html


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    4003 -- clown image archive http://www.unitedmedia.com/comics/dilbert/duh/images/decision.gif http://www.killuglytv.com/ads/newevilfish.gif ALT=? width="100" height="100" BORDER="1" hspace="10" vspace="10" align="left"


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    4005 -- Lynd Ward Archive Lynd Ward died in 1985 http://www.antioch.com/wardx56.jpg http://www.antioch.com/wardx58.jpg

    ? http://www.antioch.com/lynd.html

    http://www.bpib.com/lyndward.htm

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    4009 -- sid vicious sex pistols nazi graphic on t shirt http://www.geocities.co.jp/MusicStar/6282/pistols/discography/boot.html

    http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/7412/punklinx.html

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    4500 -- shorts


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    4500 -- Charles Bukowki material archive this guys index has images & texts: http://hinux.hin.no/~eyvhans/bukdikt/


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    4500 -- ??????????????
    http://users.lanminds.com/~jchas/winners.html


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    4500 -- raspberry image


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    4500 -- brain image


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    4500 -- moving body image


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    4500 -- nuns with guns image


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    4500 -- manson et al animated poster image


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    4500 -- music animated poster image


    4509 -- Massive collection of links to photos of anarchists, good also to track down biographical info William Godwin - Engraving - Lampooned Group Photos - Group #1 Left to Right: Fernando Garrido, Elias Reclus, Jose Maria Orense, Aristides Rey, Giuseppi Fanelli. - Madrid Internationalists Rather large photo includes Fanelli & many others. Albert Jay Nock - Nock #1 Rafael Farga Pellicer - Pellicer #1 Salvador Sequi - Sequi #1 Seals & Logos - Page full of Anarchist Seals & Logos

    Flag Home Page Anarchist Library http://flag.blackened.net/anarpics/


    4509 -- ANARCHIST ARCHIVE Suzanne La Folette was the key link between 19th century & 20th century libertarian feminism in America. Her noted work Concerning Women11 was published in 1926, & she helped Albert Jay Nock establish The Freeman, a leading political & literary journal of the time.12 Later, after World War Two, she was also involved with the founding of William Buckley's National Review (which, alas, turned into a primarily conservative rather than libertarian journal). http://www.digiweb.com/igeldard/LA/pamphlets/lib-fem.htm#chapVIII


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    4519 -- AIT LOGO (International Workers Association /Asociación Internacional de los Trabajadores) A I T
    http://cabanel.jennifer.free.fr/galerie_anarchosyndicalisme_et_syndicalisme_revolutionnaire/pages/ait_logo.htm


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    4519 -- superman image archive




    4600 -- ?



    5000 -- POETRY ARCHIVE At point zero, radiant energy is released at the speed of light, but you can see it here in slow motion. --Arthur Sze, The Los Alamos Museum

    I invent myself, a sliding number game from a birthday party. --Linette Lao, Evolution

    The wise man wants to know what color are the irises behind the flour white membranes --Cheryl Gilbert, Themis Is Not Related To Zeus, She's Just a Bird With a Funny Name.

    The Great White Mayor sleeps alone in the family tree and owns the hand with which you eat.

    --Dale Houstman, There Is Also A City

    give you an untamed afternoon blowing blackbirds off course Clerks chase a yellow memo through the park --Carolyn Stoloff, Slides

    Knowledge is sequence, not tense, & in that sense space, not time, is ticking in our heads & matter is all that matters. --Morton Marcus, The Big Broadcast

    The water in your flower vase five days old, my radio losing its signal as the sky draws near. --Timothy Liu, Forty Percent Chance of Rain

    Last night I burned three hundred calories dreaming about your hair --John Engman, Terrible Weather Conditions

    I take the rainy landscape from my window remove the shadow of the wutong tree wipe you off --Yang Mu, The Woman In Black

    We remain who we are, but slowly, by insertion. --Elizabeth Robinson, Appointment

    which explains their coiling & chewing, down this white wall next to the driveway, in this last heat of August. --Dieter Weslowski, The Snail Carries Both Sexes

    The oldest Mercedes in California adorns the crowded foyer of the L. A. County Museum of Natural History. --B. H. Fairchild, A Model of Downtown Los Angeles, 1940

    http://www.calweb.com/~tnklbnny/caliban7page.html


    Mad Magazine
    5000 --
    http://www.klab.caltech.edu/~seckel/trident.html


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    5000 --



    5000 -- "There is a lot of bullshit in Lawrence, Miller, or Patchen -- but their enemies are my enemies." (Rexroth) Three new Rexroth essays are now online at the BPS website -- MARK TWAIN http://www.bopsecrets.org/rexroth/essays/twain.htm "It was the official culture which was schizophrenic, not Mark Twain. The whole meaning of Mark Twain is that he 'saw life steadily & saw it whole'... If Baudelaire was the greatest poet of the capitalist epoch... Mark Twain wrote its saga, its prose Iliad & Odyssey." POETRY, REGENERATION, & D.H. LAWRENCE http://www.bopsecrets.org/rexroth/essays/lawrence.htm "Lawrence did not try to mislead himself with false promises, imaginary guarantees... Communion & oblivion, sex & death, the mystery can be revealed -- but it can be revealed only as totally inexplicable. Lawrence never succumbed to the temptation to try to do more. He succeeded in what he did do." KENNETH PATCHEN, NATURALIST OF THE PUBLIC NIGHTMARE http://www.bopsecrets.org/rexroth/essays/patchen.htm "Patchen has gone back to the world of Edward Lear & interpreted it in terms of the modern sensibility of the disengaged, the modern comic horrors of le monde concentrationnaire. It is as if, not a slick New Yorker correspondent, but the Owl & the Pussycat were writing up Hiroshima."


    5000 -- Subject: Re: Geoff? / Reclaiming Our History Date: Sun, 7 Apr 2002 21:34:01 -0700 (PDT) From: ets@scn.org (SCN User) To: recall@eskimo.com Hey Dave,

    I was rooting around thru old ETS! e-mails -- I check the account about once a month, it rotates among several people, & I seem to be the only one who thinks to clean out old correspondence -- & I came across your note, which was never forwarded to me. Grrr.

    Anyway, offhand, I suspect the item comes from someone's peace calendar. Most of my CO entries come from Housmans or the WRL calendar; since this is US, I'd guess an old WRL calendar, but I don't have 'em notated so it's hard to say. They're at wrl@igc.org if you wanna fire off an inquiry.

    I've actually got a long list of research questions (ideal for an intern or curious volunteer some day -- most are probably easily resolvable on the net, I just haven't had time) where there were/are conflicts between stuff you & I had, different listings you had that were mutually contradictory, or other questions that have popped up where different sources disagree. I'm sure you've got a list a mile long of that sorta stuff.

    Anyway, I'm much more easily reachable over the phone (324-5369) or at the usual e-mail (geovlp@earthlink.net) than at this account.

    cheers & sabotage geov (not "geoff"!) >

    >Geoff still around these days? I have a question regard a date >in Reclaiming Our History: > >FEBRUARY 12. 1947: Between 400 & 500 veterans & > conscientious objectors from World Wars I & II burn their > draft cards in two demonstrations, in front of the White House & at the Labor Temple in New York City, in protest > of a proposed universal conscription law. First draft card > burning in U.S. > >Any chance there is a source or reference for this date/event? > >Dave >Daily Bleed >http://www.recollectionbooks.com/bleed/0212.htm > > >


    Emma Goldman, Anarchist Feminist
    9000 -- 1939

    Manuscripts in the Labadie Collection

    Introduction

    The Joseph A. Labadie Collection, one of the oldest collections of radical history in the United States, documents a wide variety of social protest movements & organizations of the nineteenth & twentieth centuries. While the printed materials—some 8,000 serials, 35,000 monographs, & 20,000 pamphlets—are without doubt the major strengths of the Collection, the manuscript holdings provide added coverage of certain subjects & persons involved in radical movements.

    The nucleus of the Collection, donated to The University of Michigan in 1911, consists of the personal papers & library of Charles Joseph Antoine Labadie (1850-1933), known familiarly as Jo Labadie, an important figure in the fledgling Michigan labor movement of the late nineteenth century, was born on a frontier farm near Paw Paw, Michigan, to parents of French and Indian descent. Learning the printer's trade in South Bend, Indiana, he joined the International Typographical Union in his teens & after a few years of wandering about the country, settled in Detroit in 1872.

    In 1878, Labadie organized the first Michigan branch of the Knights of Labor, disguising it as the Washington Literary Society, & in the same year amassed several hundred votes as candidate for mayor of Detroit on the Greenback-Labor Party ticket. In 1880, he helped organize the Detroit Council of Trades & Labor Unions & served as its first president. Attracted by the Socialist Labor Party, he furthered its views by editing several of the earliest labor papers in Michigan, such as the Detroit Socialist, Three Stars, & Advance & Labor Leaf. Labadie's interest in the labor movement continued, & nine years later he was instrumental in the founding of the Michigan Federation of Labor, again serving as first president.

    He did not, however, adhere to the dominant Republican & Democratic parties but remained radical in his social views. Fearing the concentration of power in a centralized government, he became wary of the future of socialism & found the doctrines of individualist anarchism, as promulgated by Benjamin Tucker, more congenial to his aspirations. His subsequent activism, writings, & demeanor won him the appelation "the gentle anarchist." His life was not without drama, however. Labadie had been employed by the Detroit Water Board since 1893 but was suddenly dismissed in 1908 because of his anarchist convictions. Vehement public outcry resulted in his quick reinstatement & brought him many new friends.

    In 1912 Labadie retired to a farm near Wixom, Michigan (now in Kensington Park, where the ruins may be viewed), spending the next twenty years writing, printing, & distributing anarchist materials. Before moving to "Bubbling Waters," he donated his books, pamphlets, journals, personal papers, & ephemera to The University of Michigan.

    One of Labadie's friends in later years was Agnes Ann Inglis (1870-1952). The daughter of a prominent & wealthy Detroit family, Inglis led a confined life for her first thirty years, nursing her invalid sister & mother. After their deaths she volunteered for settlement work at Hull House in Chicago & Franklin House in Detroit. In 1905 she moved to Ann Arbor where her interests broadened to include such issues as labor unions, prostitution, venereal disease, and birth control. Although she briefly joined the Socialist Party, her friendship with Emma Goldman led her to anarchism. Over the next two decades, she zealously supported Goldman's causes, opposed U.S. involvement in World War I, & protested the trials & imprisonments of anarchists & Industrial Workers of the World members.

    In 1924 Inglis tried to consult the Labadie Collection for her research but found it had remained boxed & untouched. Since the materials were too disorganized for use, she began what was to become her life-long work: the arrangement & custodianship of Jo Labadie's donation. Because Inglis was without archival or library training, her methods of organizing the material were personal & somewhat idiosyncratic. Nonetheless, she enriched the collection enormously by acquiring books, serials, pamphlets, letters, & other records of persons involved in radical movements. Moreover, Inglis corresponded extensively with her network of friends, soliciting their memoirs & documentation of significant events & persons. During the period Inglis served as curator (1924-1952), the Labadie Collection grew perhaps by twenty-fold.

    In 1960 Edward C. Weber became Head of the Labadie Collection. Following Miss Inglis's earlier example, Mr. Weber initiated extensive correspondence with individuals, groups, and organizations active in publishing or disseminating radical literature. He is largely responsible for the collection's substantial holdings in the areas of civil rights, the student protests and anti-war movements of the tumultuous sixties, modern anarchist & Trotskyist literature, as well as materials on gay liberation, radical feminism, & pacifism, amnesty, & anti-nuclear movements.

    The approximately 225 linear feet of Labadie manuscript holdings are strongest in the area of anarchism. Such figures as Emma Goldman, Josiah Warren, & Benjamin Tucker appear prominently along with the anarchist tenets of free thought , communal living, sexual freedom, & libertarian opposition to government. Early labor history, especially Michigan labor movements, are illumined by the papers of Jo Labadie, Henry Bool, David Boyd, & Judson Grenell. Many collections document the act ivities of the Industrial Workers of the World & its members.

    The Labadie Collection has relatively little manuscript material on older democratic socialist parties & the numerous parties aligned with the Fourth International although there is a great wealth of printed material. Communism is represented more by groups defending alleged members in legal cases, such as the American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born, or the papers of William A. Reuben, the journalist who investigated the Hiss, Rosenberg, Sobell, and Soblen cases, than by the official American Communist Party.

    Women's organizations have few records in the Collection, but women active in protest movements not nominally related to women's rights, such as anarchism, socialism, & labor, are better represented. Carol Jacobsen’s Porn I’mage’ry Co llection, documenting her controversial art exhibit on prostitution & pornography, was censored by the University’s Law School Students. Utopian & cooperative living experiments, such as Sunrise Co-operative Farm Community & Commonwealth College & Colony, & the free school movement also form a small part of the manuscript collections. Contemporary topics include prison reform, world government, pacifism, environmental concerns, & the counterculture.

    In 1964 the Labadie Collection became part of The Department of Rare Books & Special Collections, The University Library, The University of Michigan. The deparment’s name was subsequently changed to Special Collections Library. Use of the Labadie Collection is open to all researchers, although special conditions govern the use of manuscript materials and researchers are urged to write or call ahead. Photoduplication services are available, subject to the condition of the material & copyright or donor restrictions. Questions about regulations governing collection use & the scope of the collection should be directed to the Labadie Collection, Special Collections Library, 711 Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1205, telephone (734)764-9377. The Department is open from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, & 10:00 a.m. to noon Saturday.

    Edward C. Weber, Curator

    Labadie Collection

    Guide to Collections

    A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | V | W | Y | Adler, Joyce Sparer, 1915 Papers, 1949-1983. 19 items.

    Adler was an educator & writer whose application to become licensed as chairman of an English department in a New York City high school was rejected in 1952 because of her alleged Communist Party membership. The collection includes photocopies of correspondence, memoranda, applications, recommendation forms, reports of classroom observations, and transcripts of interviews concerning the rejection of her licensing application by the Board of Examiners of the New York City Board of Education & her subsequent efforts to have the "unsatisfactory" rating expunged from her file. Correspondents & examiners include Anthony J. Alvarado, Jay Elihu Greene, Isaac Hersh, Gertrude Martha Kufahl, Alexander S. Massell, Saul Moskoff, & Harold Siegel. The original papers are in the possession of the Board of Examiners, Board of Education of the City of New York, & the Teachers College Archives, Columbia University.

    American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born. Records, 1926-1932. 62 feet & 2 volumes. Unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    The ACPFB was founded in 1933 to assist immigrants in gaining citizenship, to protect those facing deportation or denaturalization, to influence legislation affecting the foreign born, & to combat official harassment of the foreign born. The collection contains case files of individuals assisted by the Committee, conference proceedings, correspondence, legal documents, writings, publications, news releases, newspaper clippings, financial records, & subject files, which document the Committee's public appeals; efforts to repeal the Walter-McCarran Immigration Act & other legislation; assistance to left-wing labor unions & organizations such as the International Labor Defense & International Workers Order; relations with other ethnic, labor, & civil liberties organizations & with the foreign language press; litigation with the Subversive Activities Control Board, which listed the Committee as a subversive organization in the 1950s because of its aid to persons & groups with Communist affiliations; & relations with area committees for protection of foreign born, particularly Los Angeles, California; Chicago, Illinois; & Minnesota. Correspondents include Roger Baldwin, executive secretaries Dwight Morgan & Abner Green; legal counsels Carol King, Blanch Freedman, & Ira Gollobin; honorary chairpersons Louise Pettibone Smith & Lee Ball; & writers, actors, & other public figures who served as sponsors of the Committee's activities. The Committee dissolved in 1982.

    Arcos, Federico, collector, 1920- Emma Goldman papers, 1935-1940. 269 items. List of correspondents available.

    Photocopies of papers that were in Emma Goldman's apartment at the time of her death; the originals are in the possession of Mr. Arcos, a Spanish anarchist who fought in the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), & who has been a Canadian resident since 1940. The collection contains correspondence, essays, circular letters, newspaper clippings, & photos dealing primarily with Goldman's activities on behalf of anarchists in Spain during the Civil War & on behalf of four men, including Arthur Bortolotti & Marcus Joachim, arrested in Toronto for anti-Fascist agitation. Principal correspondents include Dorothy Rogers, Goldman's secretary (1939-40); Stella Ballantine, Goldman's niece; Malcolm Cowley, Nick Di Domenico, Mary Eleanor Fitzgerald , James Heney, Anna & Maximilian Olay, John C. Powys, Milly and Rudolf Rocker, & Mollie Steimer & Senya Fleshin . Requests for photocopies and permission to quote must be referred to the donor. The papers are in English, Italian, & Spanish.

    Babyfish... lost its momma Records, 1988-1994. 1 linear ft. Unpublished finding aid available in repository The collection includes ‘zine page proofs, printing receipts, financial records, & original artwork for five of the original six issues of Babyfish... lost its momma, a Detroit anarchist journal published between 1988 & 1994, which addressed themes relating to local and national sexual, social, political, & economic issues through poetry, art & essays. Also included are other publications by the same editor, Sunfrog (Andy Smith, b. 1968).

    Barnhill, John Basil, 1864-1929. Papers, 1891-1925. 180 items. List of correspondents available.

    Libertarian writer, lecturer, debater, & editor of various journals, among them The Eagle and Serpent (under the pseudonym John Erwin McCall), Nationalist, American Anti-Socialist, & Humanity First. The papers include correspondence; articles, essays, & speeches, some fragmentary or in draft form; requests for Barnhill's anti-socialist literature; & two scrapbooks of newspaper clippings. Among the correspondents are Jonathan Burwell Frost, Edward H. Fulton, Henry C. Rawie, & Henry Replogle. One of Barnhill's essays gives an account of the Civil War battle at Kennesaw Mountain, Tennessee, June 27, 1864, in which Lt. Col. R. S. Barnhill was killed. The essay is accompanied by documents, including lists of captured goods.

    Beffel, John Nicholas, 1887-1973. Papers, 1927-1949. 14 items. List of correspondents available.

    Radical journalist who wrote on labor topics for Industrial Worker. The collection consists of correspondence; articles, including obituaries for Joseph J. Ettor & Pat Quinlan; plans for an unpublished(?) magazine called Land of the Free; & a newspaper clipping.

    Blanc, Louis, 1811-1882. Papers, 1840-1878. 64 items. French socialist, politician, & journalist, whose attacks on the government caused agitation among workers & forced him into exile in London from 1848 until 1871. The papers consist of five manuscripts & 59 letters, most addressed to Escudier, the publisher of his works, & to his friend Noel Parfait (1813-1898).

    Bool, Henry. Correspondence, 1895-1921. 351 items. List of correspondents available.

    Correspondence of Bool, a businessman & anarchist, chiefly concerns financial support of anarchists & their publications, particularly Benjamin R. Tucker & his journal Liberty and Moses Harman & Lucifer, the Light-bearer; distribution of Bool's pamphlet "Liberty Luminants" & other literature; the philosophy & activities of anarchist friends and acquaintances, especially John William Lloyd; & personal & business affairs. Correspondents include John Basil Barnhill, Steven T. Byington, Emmet Densmore, James B. Elliott, Edward H. Fulton, William W. Gordak, Lillian Harman, Lizzie M. Holmes, Joseph Labadie, John William Lloyd, George E. Priest, Georgia Replogle, Nathaniel Schmidt, Horace Traubel, B. R. Tucker, & Alfred Westrup.

    Boyd, David Armitage, 1868-1939. Labor papers, 1878-1939. 147 items. List of correspondents available.

    Machinist, printer, union organizer & officer, & member of the Knights of Labor, Michigan Federation of Labor, & International Association of Machinists. The collection contains correspondence, financial records, biographical information, personal documents, & union records relating to his work as a labor leader & organizer; an essay, "The Labor Movement of Detroit"; & Minutes Report Book for the Detroit Assembly of the Knights of Labor (1878), which was called the Washington Literary Society to conceal its identity. Correspondents include Samuel Gompers, Patrick J. McCormick, Paul Marrin, Frank Morrison, Hazen S. Pingree, & Michigan labor leaders.

    Boyle, Kay. (Cambodia) Papers, 1966. .25 linear ft. Unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    Boyle (1902-1992), poet, novelist, award winning short story writer, & correspondent for The New Yorker, took a trip to Cambodia in 1966 with six other U.S. citizens sponsored by Americans Want to Know. The purpose was a fact-finding mission to investigate the U.S. Goverments assertion that, among other things, Cambodia was being used a s a sanctuary for the Vietcong. Her findings were reported in the November 1966 issue of The Progressive. The collection consists of typed drafts of The Progressive article, photographs of the delegation as well as of war damage in the Cambodian countryside, a few letters from friends, including one from Joan Baez.

    Bray, John Francis, 1809-1897. Papers, ca. 1822-1896. 1.5 feet.

    Bray, a socialist, writer, printer, & daguerreotype artist, emigrated from the United States to England in 1822 & became a member of the Leeds Workingmen's Association. While there, he wrote labor's Wrongs & labor's Remedy; or, The Age of Might & the Age of Right (1839). He returned to the United States in 1842 & eventually settled in Pontiac, Michigan. His papers include correspondence with James Callahan, editor of The Labor Enquirer, Elihu Finnie of the Leeds Liberal Association, Samuel Gompers, Judson Grenell, Burnette Haskell, Joseph Labadie, Alcander Longley, Dyer Lum, & others; articles & essays, primarily on socialism & labor, but also on aerial navigation, perpetual motion, & farmers; accounts; receipts; a Knights of Labor dues book; an announcement of an Anti-Monopoly Convention; newspaper clippings; photos; & memorabilia. Also included are notes by Agnes Inglis about Bray & his parents, who were actors in the eastern United States; printed biographical articles about Bray; & a photocopy of part of his utopian tract, the original of which is held by the British Library of Political & Economic Science, London School of Economics & Political Science, University of London. A photocopy of his diary is also contained in the collection; the original was donated to Edwin R. A. Seligman in 1939 & is now in the Seligman Collection, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University, New York. A list of books and printed material from Bray's library, now shelved with the Labadie Collection's printed works, is available.

    California Labor School, San Francisco. Records, 1943-1955. ca. 2 feet.

    Formerly the Tom Mooney Labor School, the records consist of correspondence, minutes of faculty meetings, faculty committee reports, financial records & fundraising materials, promotional flyers & press releases, student publications, course outlines & course announcement flyers, school term schedules from 1950 to 1955, & a transcript of the proceedings of a forum, "Industry & Labor in the Postwar World," held on July 26, 1944. Included are letters to Yehudi Menuhin & Isaac Stern concerning support of a music department at CLS. The school was investigated in 1946 by the Tenney Committee, the California legislature's Joint Fact-Finding Committee on Un-American Activities, on the charge that an institute jointly held by CLS & the University of California was Communist-sponsored. However, the only indication of this fact in the records is brief mention in the faculty meeting minutes.

    Carey, George V. Papers, 1913-1950. 225 items. List of correspondents available.

    Carey was a freethinker, socialist, & secretary of the Industrial Workers of the World's Toledo Recruiting Union, ca. 1917; chairman of the IWW's Chicago Recruiting Union, ca. 1919; and chairman, beginning about 1932, of the IWW's Kentucky Miners' Defense & Relief Committee. His papers include correspondence with IWW & Socialist Party officials, other workers' organizations & unions, imprisoned Kentucky miners & IWW members, & with Mrs. Rena Mooney regarding misuse of Tom Mooney defense funds; leaflets; financial records; letters to editors; writings & reports, including a history of the IWW & a description of an attempt to disrupt a Newark, New Jersey, IWW meeting; a circular concerning the scattering of Joe Hill's ashes; & other material relating to the IWW. Among the correspondents are John Beffel, Dave Dellinger, William D. Haywood, Herbert Mahler, Tom Mooney, Norman Thomas, and Andrew P. Wittel.

    Chaapel family. Papers, 1852-1942, bulk 1874-1899. 60 items. List of correspondents available.

    Consist primarily of writings by Jay Chaapel (1829-1902)—freethinker, spiritualist, lecturer, and editor—on a variety of topics: Shaker communities in New England, including a biographical essay on Ann Lee; descriptions of places in Maine, ca. 1898; the death of John Brown as remembered by Elizabeth Richards Tilton, whose husband Theodore Tilton had assisted with the burial; & thoughts on spiritualism, love & marriage, women's rights, people, & events. There are holograph copies of writings by others, including extracts from 16 letters, 1793-95, of Mary Wollstonecraft to Gilbert Imlay, accompanied by extensive biographical notes on Wollstonecraft. Correspondence includes an 1879 letter from an elderly Shaker sister criticizing the celibate life, three letters from Jay Chaapel to his first wife, Calphurnia Crofut, a few letters of other family members, including his children (Harry, Ralph, and Belle Chaapel), & one letter from Jacob Sechler Coxey to Belle Chaapel concerning the death of John Basil Barnhill.

    Chaplin, Ralph, 1887-1961. Papers, 1909-1948. 121 items. List of correspondents available.

    Publicist for the Industrial Workers of the World; labor activist, poet, artist, & editor of Solidarity (1917), Industrial Worker (1932-36), Voice of the Federation (1937), & Labor Advocate (1941-45). The collection includes correspondence, some addressed to his wife, Edith, & his son, Ivan; his autograph album containing an IWW prison song & autographs of fellow prisoners in Cook County Jail, 1917; notes on the 1918 Chicago IWW trial; drafts of poems written while imprisoned at Leavenworth Penitentiary, 1918-23; an open letter to President Harding from 52 IWW members in Leavenworth who refused to apply for individual clemency, 1922; a photostat of Digest of California criminal syndicalism cases, written by the California branch of the IWW's General Defense Committee, 1926; & a report by A. W. Curtis on the Centralia, Washington, trial of IWW lumbermen. The papers also concern the publication of his pamphlets & books, & the organization, activities, & publications of Technocracy, Inc., a group promoting the technocracy movement, 1933-34. Among the correspondents are Roger N. Baldwin, Eugene Debs, John Dos Passos, Enrique Flores Magon, William D. Haywood, Ammon Hennacy, William Knight, & Upton Sinclair.

    Citizens Committee for Constitutional Liberties. Records, ca. 1961-1973. 1.5 feet.

    Established to work for repeal of the McCarran Act & other legislation authorizing surveillance of political activities. Files of executive secretary Miriam Friedlander, including correspondence with Committee members, other civil liberties organizations, & members of Congress, & drafts of publications, press releases, & speeches. Correspondents include Lee H. Ball, Carl Braden, Gus Hall, Linus Pauling, Norman Thomas, & Willis Uphaus.

    Cohen, Joseph Jacob, 1878-1953. Sunrise Co-operative Farm Community papers, 1933-1940. 21 items.

    Founder & secretary, 1933-1936, of Sunrise Co-operative Farm Community, a libertarian collectivist colony established in Alicia, Michigan, 1933-1938, & reestablished in Samos, Virginia, 1938-1940. Personal & official correspondence of Cohen & his successor as secretary, Philip Trupin, concerning efforts to obtain assistance for the struggling community, sale of the farm to the government, a suit by dissatisfied members, & reorganizing the community in Virginia; reports; proposals; court proceedings; & a manuscript of Cohen's book about the community, In Quest of Heaven. Correspondents include Zenas C. Dickinson, William Haber, Glenn S. Kies, Martin H. Sharrer, & Merton L. Wright. The principal collection of Sunrise records is located in the Michigan Historical Collections, The University of Michigan.

    Crew, Louie, 1936- Papers,1936-1987. 27+ feet.. List of correspondents available.

    Gay activist, poet, & teacher of English. The papers consist of correspondence, writings, subject files, miscellaneous printed matter, photos, books, & journals documenting Crew's professional activities as a professor of English composition & author of scholarly articles and poetry. The central focus is Crew's gay activism, especially in the context of the Episcopal Church & the academic community. Organizations well represented in the collection include the Gay Academic Union, Black & White Men Together, the Gay People's Union of the University of Wisconsin, & the National Council of Teachers of English. A good deal of the correspondence & subject files relate to his involvement with Integrity, an Episcopal forum for gay rights which Crew founded, & whose journal, Integrity, he edited. Crew's activism extended to work for the equal rights of blacks & women as well as for better treatment of gays in prison. The correspondence includes letters with inmates, particularly John L. Natkie. Other subjects include Crew's discrimination suit against American University & the pervasive discrimination he faced in housing & employment. Additions to the collection are anticipated.

    Cushway, Phil. Papers, 1970-1978. 1 foot.

    Student activist at The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Cushway's papers consist of correspondence, notes, & research material regarding the local People's Bicentennial Commission, the Indochina Peace Campaign, & various radical movements at the University.

    De Cleyre, Voltairine, 1866-1912. Collection, 1876-1914. 86 items. Unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    Michigan-born anarchist, poet, lecturer, writer, & teacher. The collection contains correspondence, poems, essays, photos, biographical information, her obituary, commentaries on subjects in the news, & newspaper accounts of a speech she gave in 1908 to unemployed Italians, Jews, & blacks in Philadelphia & the ensuing riot. Correspondents include her mother Harriet E. DeClaire, Sister Mary Imelda, members of the Livshis family, Dyer Lum, Hugh Pentecost, Adelaide Thayer, & Lemuel Washburn.

    Denton family. Papers, 1875-1949. 48 items. List of correspondents available.

    Correspondence of Professor William Denton (1823-1883) of Wellesley, Massachusetts, his wife Elizabeth M. Foote Denton, other family members, & Josephine Tilton; photos; & a memorandum by Dr. Bertha Johnson identifying Denton family members. The collection also includes Josephine Tilton's autograph album, which contains inscriptions by authors, reformers, and anarchists; two copies of The Word; & correspondence, obituaries, & newspaper clippings relating to the anarchist Ezra Heywood, a free speech & free press advocate who was imprisoned in the 1870s for sending "obscene" material through the mail. Among the correspondents are Theodore Debs, Moses Harman, Angela Heywood, Dyer Lum, Archibald H. Simpson, & Edwin C. Walker.

    Doree, E.F., 1889-1927 Papers, 1917-1922 .5 linear ft. Unpublished finding aid available in repository

    General Secretary of the Textile Workers Union of the Industrial Workers of the World, sentenced to ten years at Leavenworth Prison for violation of the war time Espionage Act; pardoned by Warren G. Harding in 1922. The collection contains corresponde nce, depositions, newspaper clippings, Doree’s original pardon document signed by Warren G. Harding, bond receipts, one issue of the Leavenworth Bulletin (8/18/22), lists of arrestees, some printed materials, & 16 original photographs. There are 247 letters from Doree to his wife, Chiky (Ida), during his imprisonment, & 17 letters from others relating to his case & the case of Walter Nef, Doree’s brother-in-law, who was convicted of the same charges & sentenced to twenty years. There are also le tters from Frank O’Hare & Kate Richards O’Hare.

    Elliott, James B. Papers, 1853-1912. 8 items.

    Secretary of the Thomas Paine Memorial Association. The collection consists of letters from Voltairine de Cleyre, Alden Freeman, Emma Goldman, William Van der Weyde, & others, covering a variety of topics, but including De Cleyre's speaking engagements in Massachusetts in 1894 & Goldman's plans for a week in Philadelphia in 1901 & her availability as a speaker.

    Fabijanovic, Stephanus, 1868-1933. Papers, 1904-1933. 5 feet (ca. 2000 items). List of correspondents available.

    Slavic immigrant baker, hobo, & writer. Correspondence of Fabijanovic & his wife, writings, photos, newspaper clippings, & an obituary of Fabijanovic from Freedom relate to his philosophical & anarchist thought, a bakery & confectionery workers' union, the publication & distribution of his papers, his travels, & personal matters. Among the correspondents are Louis Adamic, John B. Barnhill, Norman Beard, natural pathologist Otto Brunner, Karl Dopf, Enrique Flores Magon, Wilhelm Fox, Charlotte Francke-Pellon, Emma Goldman, Rudolf Grossman, Max Metzkow, Max Nettlau, Carl Nold, Nicholas Petanovic, Charles L. Robinson, Rudolf Rocker, Stefan Zweig, & family members. The papers are in English, French, German, Hungarian, & Serbo-Croatian.

    Fellowship of Freedom. Records, 1905-1926. 5 inches.

    Loosely-organized freethinker & libertarian group that promoted the interchange of ideas about issues such as the single tax & anarchism, & listed among its thirteen members at the time of formal organization in 1912 Herman Kuehn, Joseph Labadie, W. P. "Bil" Tubbs, Al G. Wagner, and Austin W. Wright. The collection contains correspondence, notes, & writings of members; circular letters; a list of members; newspaper clippings; & a copy of the Egoist. The group's two publications, Fellowship Clearing House & Instead of a Magazine, dating from 1915 & 1916, are located with the Labadie Collection’s printed works.

    "Freie Arbeiter Stimme", New York. Articles for publication, 1922-1940. 62 items.

    Drafts of articles submitted for publication in this New York-based Yiddish anarchist journal, including one each by Thomas Bell, Harry Kelly, Anatol' Konse, Max Nomad, & Rudolf Rocker; four by Augustin Souchy; nine by Max Nettlau; & seven articles & 37 "Lettres de France" by Christian Cornelissen.

    Gaede, Erwin A. Sobell papers, 1959-1966. 73 items. List of correspondents available.

    Papers of Gaede, a Unitarian minister, include correspondence with Helen Sobell & others, speeches, notes, reports of tours, poems by Helen Sobell, & photos relating to Gaede's efforts on behalf of Morton Sobell, who was convicted of espionage in 1951 along with Julius and Ethel Rosenberg.

    Emma Goldman, 1869-1940. Collection of papers, 1909-1940. 104 items. Unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    Anarchist lecturer & writer, birth control advocate, & founder & editor of Mother Earth. The collection contains photocopies of correspondence, 1913-1932, between Goldman and Agnes Inglis, the originals of which are at the International Institute for Social History in Amsterdam; correspondence with Roger Baldwin, Harry Kelly, Eugene Lyons, Max Nettlau, Kate R. O'Hare, Ben Reitman, Bertrand Russell, Augustin Souchy, & others; essays by and about Goldman, including her recollections of Voltairine de Cleyre; reviews & other materials concerning her autobiography, Living My Life; circular letters distributed by Mother Earth; & newspaper clippings. The papers chiefly concern lecture tours, activities in support of anarchists & revolutionaries, particularly in Russia, England, & Spain, her response to reviews of Living My Life, the illness & death of Alexander Berkman, & mutual friends & acquaintances. The papers are in English, German, & Spanish.

    Goodhue, F. M., 1870? Commonwealth College papers, 1931-1954. 12 items. Unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    Goodhue was an early member of Commonwealth Colony in New Llano, Louisiana, & an official of Commonwealth College, a cooperative, democratic labor school in Mena, Arkansas, founded in 1923 by Kate Richards O'Hare & William E. Zeuch. The papers include correspondence, articles, newspaper clippings, & an extensive typescript by Goodhue on the history of the Colony & the College. They document the early years of the College, dissension among the faculty over the sexual conduct of students, a student strike, & dissolution & sale of the College in 1940-41.

    Goodman, Judith (Singer), 1881-1943. Papers, 1904-1930. 34 items.

    The papers consist of the correspondence of Goodman, a Russian immigrant anarchist, chiefly with her brother-in-law in Russia, I. Geitsman, regarding conditions while a prisoner in Vilna, Lithuania, around 1910, & family matters. Other correspondents include Goodman's husband, Sholom, & daughters, Liza & Sara, as well as Nikolai Chaikovskii, I. O. Kryshalovich, J. de Wit, & Sophie Kropotkin, the last discussing the collection of funds for the relief of imprisoned & deported Russian anarchists. Also included is her memoir of the anarchist movement in Russia, 1904-1907, a short biography of Goodman by her daughter, Sara, & six photos of Russian anarchists, most killed or deported during the Revolution of 1905 & the ensuing pogroms. The papers are in English, Russian, & Yiddish.

    Graham, Marcus, pseud. Papers, 1936-1939. 8 items.

    Marcus Graham was the pseudonym of Shmuel Marcus (1893-?), Rumanian-born editor of the anarchist journal Man!, which was published from 1933 to 1940. His papers include letters from Michael A. Cohen, Frederick J. Gould, Bolton Hall, & Henry J. Stuart, & two essays by Steven T. Byington, "Why is a War?" & "Benjamin Ricketson Tucker," all marked for apparent publication in Man!, a letter from Max Metzkow enclosing an anarchist leaflet about the Homestead Strike circulated shortly before the trial of Alexander Berkman, & a letter from D. Alonso concerning the Comite pro Libertad de Prensa Marcus Graham & translating a Graham pamphlet into Spanish.

    Grenell, Judson, 1847-1930. Papers, 1882-1930. 102 items. Unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    Detroit socialist, labor activist, & newspaperman. Grenell's papers consist of letters from Joseph Labadie regarding his family history, health, printing shop, & daily activities; correspondence with Detroit city attorney John B. Corliss, John M. McGregor, William Ziegenfuss, & others; articles; essays; biographical notes; circulars for the Michigan Site-Value-Tax League; & a copy of & statements in support of the 1882 platform of the Detroit Council of Trades & Labor Unions . The papers chiefly concern Grenell's activities with the labor movement, especially in Detroit, his interests in agriculture, economics, and taxation, & his studies of leaders in these fields, including Henry George, Joseph A. Labadie, John M. McGregor, & Roy W. Sellars.

    Harp, Carl, 1949-1981. Letters to Bruce Allen, 1976-1980. 30 items.

    An anarchist poet, author, & prison activist, Harp was also a founder of Anarchist Black Dragon Collective, an underground prison political group, & Men Against Sexism, which was organized to protect homosexual prisoners. The letters, written by Harp while incarcerated in San Quentin & in Washington State Prison, concern appeals of his conviction, political ideas, his efforts to improve prison conditions, & prison events. Also included are letters by a prison official & others, an explanatory memo by Allen, & a flyer protesting Harp's murder in prison.

    Heinzen, Karl Peter, 1809-1880. Papers, 1797-1905. 784 items. Extensive unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    Heinzen, a German refugee of 1848-49, was a radical author & lecturer and, from 1854 to 1879, editor of Der Pionier. Correspondence relating to Der Pionier, his efforts to prevent confirmation of Col. Ludwig Blenker as brigadier general in the United States Army, & other matters; manuscripts of his poems, lectures, articles, & other works, including Gedichte and Erlebtes; & family papers of his father, Joseph Heinzen, & his wife, Henriette Schiller Heinzen (Schiller & Moras families). Correspondents include Louis Bamberger, Heinrich von Ende, Hugo Erichsen, Ferdinand Freiligrath, Clara Neymann, Karl Roser, Julia A. Sprague, Mathilde F. Wendt, & Franz Zitz. The papers are in German, French, & English, chiefly in old-style German cursive. Many letters are accompanied by transcriptions, translations, or summaries in English. Holt, Frederick Holford, 1867-1929. Peace papers, 1915-1917. 509 items. Unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    Correspondence, photos, & other material of Detroit businessman Frederick Holt relating to his activities as a member of the Ford Peace Expedition in 1915, as the personal representative of Henry Ford & business manager for the Neut ral Conference for Continuous Mediation in 1916, & with the War Department Commission on Training Camp Activities, 1917, & the Playground & Recreation Association of America, 1917. Papers of his wife, Lilian (Silk) Holt (1869-1949), a women's suffragist & philanthropist, include a speech & correspondence, primarily about the Woman's Peace Party, 1915-1916. Among the correspondents are Henry Ford & Hungarian writer & feminist Rosika Schwimmer.

    Holtz, Mark. Letters, 1933-1934. 17 items.

    The letters, all in Russian & addressed to Holtz in Los Angeles, are from seven Russian political dissidents who had received money & the promise of reading material from Holtz. The letters give brief descriptions of the authors' desolation & great financial need, & illness among the children. The writers are L. L. Blomets, Andrei N. Kalachev, V. Khudolei, A. A. Kolemasov, Anatol' Konse, Raia V. Shul'man, & Nikolai Tushanov. Accompanied by partial translations.

    Inglis, Agnes, 1870-1952. Papers, 1909-1954. ca. 13 feet. Unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    Inglis, an anarchist, settlement worker, & friend of Joseph Labadie, was the first curator of the Labadie Collection, 1924-1952. Correspondence, memoirs, diaries, research notes, articles, essays, & administrative files reflect Inglis's friendships with other anarchists, labor leaders, and radicals; her efforts to obtain papers, records, & information for the Labadie Collection; her dealings with researchers & writers; & other work related to the Labadie Collection. Her extensive research notes & papers on Josiah Warren & John Bray are included. Among the correspondents are Irving Abrams, Emile Armand, Roger Baldwin, John Beffel, David A. Boyd, Ralph Chaplin, John Cherney, Henry Cohen, Joseph J. Cohen, Cassius Cook, Harry De Cleyre, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, Emma Goldman, Marcus Graham, Judson Grenell, Ammon Hennacy, Joseph Ishill, Bertha Johnson, Thomas Keell, Harry Kelly, Leon Kramer, Li Fei-kan , Max Metzkow, Carl Nold, Siegfried Rolland, Joseph Slight, Wallace Stegner, Pearl Johnson Tucker, Warren Starr Van Valkenburgh, & Victor S. Yarros. There is also extensive correspondence with Joseph Labadie & his son Laurance.

    International Furniture Workers Union of America, Local No. 7, New York. Records, 1859-1900. 10 volumes.

    Bound volumes of Protokoll der Versammlung, International Mobel-Arbeiter Union, containing minutes, union literature, & newspaper clippings. This local remained aloof from the 1895 amalgamation of the Furniture Workers Union & the Machine Wood Workers International Union into the Amalgamated Wood Workers International Union of America. The local joined the United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners in 1900. Prominent subjects in the minutes are this merger & a jurisdictional con flict between the Amalgamated Wood Workers & the United Brotherhood.

    Johnson, Oakley, 1890-1976. Papers, 1926-1934,1966-1969. 8 inches. Unpublished finding aid available in the repository.

    Professor of English at The University of Michigan, Long Island University, City College of New York, New York Workers School, & elsewhere. The collection contains correspondence, reminiscences, campus publications, photos, & notes concerning the Negro-Caucasian Club at The University of Michigan, of which Johnson was faculty advisor in the 1920s; papers & a tape recording of the Club's 1969 reunion; correspondence, pamphlets, statements, reports, & student publications relating to the Liberal Club of the City College of New York, 1930-1932, Johnson's dismissal from the College, in part because he was faculty advisor of the Club, & the ensuing protests. Biographical material, a manuscript on Nazism, and research materials are also among the papers.

    Kuehn, Herman, 1853-1918. Correspondence, 1890-1917. 152 items. List of correspondents available.

    Freethinker, writer, orator, & businessman; editor of Fellowship Clearing House, Instead of a Magazine, & The Great Adventure. Consists chiefly of letters to Fay Lewis, a businessman in Rockford, Ill., but also include s correspondence with Bolton Hall, Henry Cohen, Louis F. Post, George A. Schilling, John Shillady, Clarence L. Swartz, Austin W. Wright, & others. The letters deal largely with definitions of terms used in their writings, e.g., freedom, duty, anarchism, ownership, liberty, etc., as well as discussions of social & political events, Kuehn's publication of Instead of a Magazine, & business affairs. Mentioned are Benjamin Tucker, Moses Harman, & Jo Labadie. Also included is an essay by Kuehn on the concept of natural rights.

    ARCHIVE MATERIAL FROM LABADIE COLLECTION http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/SpecColl.lib/LabadieManuscripts.html


    9001 -- news of another digitization project & a list of books available there

    Michigan State U excerpts from http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/learn.htm :

    What is the MSU Library Digitization Project?

    In November 1996 an ad-hoc committee was formed.... to look at the possibility of digitizing portions of the MSU Libraries' holdings. .... As a model we looked at other projects of this type that were being undertaken at other educational institutions. Cornell University served as a model to emulate. Other nationally noted projects & sources .....

    source for much of this information comes from the D-Lib Magazine: the magazine of digital library research. ......

    The selection of these materials was based upon copyright issues & the need to increase accessibility of high demand items. The American Radicalism collection .....

    Every effort has been made to observe copyright issues; however, this is still an area which requires additional investigation.

    .... priority has been given to increased access. Although preservation issues have not been disregarded in the actual process, being able to mount scanned materials on the World Wide Web has been the primary goal of the pilot project. File format, accuracy, adherence to a documents original look & file size have all required consideration.

    [The following is derived from http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/subj_struct.html This represents about half of the listings; I have listed here only items with a library call number (with one exception). The format is page images as gifs, unclear typing & all. ]

    Radicalism Collection: Titles in Subject Order

    Birth Control Movement http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hq766.s281921.htm Debate on Birth Control Margaret Sanger HQ766.S28 1921

    http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hq766.s321917.htm Family Limitations Margaret Sanger 1879-1966 HQ766.S32 1917

    http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hq57.s281920.htm What Every Girl Should Know Margaret Sanger 1879-1966 HQ57.S28 1920

    http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hq57.s281922.htm What Every Girl Should Know Margaret Sanger 1879-1966 HQ57.S28 1922 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hq56.s31921.htm What Every Mother Should Know, or, How Six Little Children Were Taught the Truth Margaret Sanger 1879-1966 HQ56.S3 1921 [For more on Sanger see book-people mail list May 5 1997; Sanger qualifies for three lists: online books, women writers, and probably banned books.] Black Panthers http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e185.615c61969.htm Are These Cats Red? Kent Courtney E185.615 C6 1969 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.b552b31971.htm Baltimore Panther Trial News various KF224.B552 B3 1971 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.c451970.htm Black Panther Party & the Case of the New York 21, The various KF224.C45 1970 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e185.615.031960z.htm Black Liberation Earl Ofari E185.616 .03 1960z http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hv5825.t31970.htm Capitalism Plus Dope Equals Genocide Michael Tabor HV5825.T3 1970 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e185.61.c551969.htm Credo for Rioters & Looters Eldridge Cleaver E185.61.C55 1969 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e185.615n481968.htm Essays from the Minister of Defense Huey P. Newton E185.615 N48 1968 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e185.615n421970.htm Genius of Huey P. Newton, The Huey P. Newton E185.615 N42 1970 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e185.615s781968.htm Huey Newton Talks to the Movement Students for a Democratic Society E185.615 S78 1968 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e185.615.j6c.3.htm Introduction To The Black Panther Party, An The John Brown Society E185.615 .J6C .3 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.b55b51970.htm Joan Bird's Statement, October, 1969 Joan Bird KF224.B55 B5 1970 [gender alert] http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e185.615.b545.htm Message to the Black Movement Black Liberation Army; Coordinating Committee E185.615.B545 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.b55w471970.htm What do the Panthers Stand For various KF224.B55 W47 1970 Hollywood Ten http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/pn1590.b5f31950.htm Facts on the Blacklist in Radio & Television various PN1590.B5 F3 1950 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/jc599.u5w581950z.htm For Justice & Peace wives of the hollywood ten JC599.U5 W58 1950z [gender alert] http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx550.m65s571951.htm Hollywood High School Speech : Exposing Reds & Their Dupes in the Film Colony Gerald L. K. Smith HX550.M65 S57 1951 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx550.m65f31949.htm Hollywood Reds are on the Run Myron C. Fagan HX550.M65 F3 1949 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx550.m65l81948.htm Luxurious Treason Various HX550.M65 L8 1948 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx550.m65g5.htm Moscow Over Hollywood Dan Gilbert HX550.M65 G5 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx550.m65f281948.htm Red Stars in Hollywood : their helpers--fellow travelers--and co-conspiritors Myron C. Fagan HX550.M65 F28 1948 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx550.m65s35.htm Screen Guide for Americans Various HX550.M65 S35 Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W.) http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5c5.htm Centralia Conspiracy, The Ralph Chaplin 1887-1961 HD8055.I5 C5 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd5325.m615b71913.htm Constitutional Government Overthrown in West Virginia John W. Brown HD5325.M165 B7 1913 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd5125.c81923.htm Cut Down the Hours of Work! Industrial Workers of the World HD5125.C8 1923 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5a26.htm Education & System, the Basis of Organization Industrial Workers of the World HD8055.I5 A26 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5e351924.htm Eight Men Buried Alive: The Centralia Case Calls to Every Decent Man & Woman in the State of Washinton to Act Quickly Industrial Workers of the World HD8055.I5 E35 1924 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd5325.l9s57.htm Everett Massacre Walker C. Smith HD5325.L9 S57 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5a25.htm Evolution & the I.W.W. Industrial Workers of the World. General Defense Committee. California Branch. HD8055.I5 A25 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd9715.u52g41922.htm General Construction Workers, Builders of America Industrial Workers of the World HD9715.U52 G4 1922 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5a27.htm Giant Industry & the I.W.W.: against the concentrated power of modern big business put the concentrated power of workers Industrial Workers of the World HD8055.I5 A27 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd6508.i421923.htm Historical Catechism of American Unionism Industrial Workers of the World HD6508.I42 1923 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5a275.htm I.W.W. & Political Parties, The Industrial Workers of the World HD8055.I5 A275 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5a28.htm I.W.W. Statement Industrial Workers of the World HD8055.I5 A28 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5b56.htm Justice & the I.W.W. Paul Frederick Brissenden HD8055.I5 B56 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5o51924.htm One Big Union of the I.W.W. Industrial Workers of the World HD8055.I5 O5 1924 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5a481922.htm Open Letter to President Harding, The Industrial Workers of the World HD8055.I5 A48 1922 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8055.i5p4.htm Persecution of Union Men in California: A Brief Story of Criminal Syndicalism & Petty Persecution Industrial Workers of the World HD8055.I5 P4 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hd8083.c2t61924.htm To the Beasts : In California as in Ancient Rome Industrial Workers of the World HD8083.C2 T6 1924 Japanese Americans--Evacuation & Relocation, 1942-1945 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/d769.8f6h331942.htm Americans of Foreign Birth in the Program for Victory Earl G. Harrison D769.8 F6 H33 1942 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/d769.8.a6a51946j.htm Community Government in War Relocation Centers United States War Relocation Authority D769.8 .A6 A5 1946J http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/d769.8a6a65.htm Displaced Japanese-Americans, The American Council on Public Affairs D769.8 A6 A65 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/d769.8a6t5.htm Democracy & Japanese Americans Norman Thomas 1884-1968 D769.8 A6 T5 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/d769.8a6r351943.htm Relocating a People Various D769.8 A6 R35 1943 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/d769.8a6r361943a.htm Relocation of Japanese-Americans Various D769.8 A6 R36 1943 A http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/d769.8a6a61967.htm Rooseveltian Concentration Camps for Japanese-Americans, 1942-46, The Austin J. App D769.8 A6 A6 1967 Ku Klux Klan http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63w6.htm America for Americans; Creed of Klanswomen Women of the Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K63W6 [gender alert] http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63c56.htm Catholic, Jew, Ku Klux Klan ; What They Believe, Where They Conflict George Sameul Clason HS2330.K63 C56 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k6a51921.htm Constitution & Laws of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K6A5 1921 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63b31928.htm Does the U.S.A. Need the K.K.K. Fred Bair HS2330.K63 B3 1928 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63e781930z.htm End of the Klu Klux Klan, The Inu Esrov HS2330.K63E78 1930z http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63a271924.htm Fundamental Klan Doctrine, A Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K63 A27 1924 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63k84.htm Ideals of the Ku Klux Klan Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K63K84 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63w65.htm Ideals of the Women of the Ku Klux Klan Women of the Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K63 W65 [gender alert] http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k62w61990.htm Installation Ceremonies Women of the Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K62 W6 1900 [gender alert] http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63h31924.htm KKK : The Kreed of the Klansmen : A Symposium Various HS2330.K63 H3 1924 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k6a71965.htm Kloran of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, Realm of Mississippi, The Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K6 A7 1965? http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63e8.htm Klan's Fight for Americanism, The Hiram Wesley Evans HS2330.K63 E8 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63j6.htm Klu Klux Klan Julia Emily Johnsen HS2330.K63 J6 [gender alert] http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63k81922.htm Ku Klux Klan, The Various HS2330.K63 K8 1922 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63f6.htm Ku Klux Klan ; It's Origin, Meaning, & Scope of Operation , The C. Lewis Fowler HS2330.K63 F6 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63c66.htm Ku Klux Klan Secrets Exposed : Attitude Toward Jews, Catholics, Foreigners, & Masons : Fraudulent Methods Used, Atrocities Committed in Name of Order Ezra Asher Cook 1841-1911 HS2330.K63 C66 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63w761924.htm Ku Klux Klan Unmasked, The W. C. (Walter Carl) Wright HS2330.K63 W76 1924 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63e835.htm Menace of Modern Immigration, The H. W. (Hiram Wesley) Evans HS2330.K63 E835 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k6n4.htm New York Klanswoman, The various HS2330.K6 N4 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63k871924.htm Practice of Klanishness, The Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K63 K87 1924 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63a34.htm Principles & Purposes of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K63 A34 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63a36.htm Questions Answered: Official Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K63A36 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k621900b.htm Ritual in the Degree of Kriterion Konservator of the Women of the Ku Klux Klan Women of the Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K62 1900b [gender alert] http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63t561920z.htm To the Citizens of Michigan Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K63T56 1920z http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63t7.htm Truth About the Women of the Ku Klux Klan, The various HS2330.K63 T7 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hs2330.k63w71923.htm Women of America: The Past! The Present! The future! Women of the Ku Klux Klan HS2330.K63 W7 1923 [gender alert] Rosenberg Case http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.r67p7.htm Appeal For Clemency, An Pritt, D.N. (Denis Nowell), 1887- KF224.R67 P7 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.r67n3.htm [Broadsides] National Committee to Secure Justice in the Rosenberg Case KF244.R67 N3 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx84.r6b61952.htm Cold War Murder Richard Boyer HX84.R6 B6 1952 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.r67c71952.htm Mercy for the Rosenbergs Abraham Cronbach KF224.R67 C7 1952 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx86.n41953.htm "Never losing faith ... " : for Julius & Ethel Rosenberg. various HX86.N4 1953 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.r6p71953.htm Rosenberg Case, The Pritt, D.N. (Denis Nowell), 1887- KF224.R6 P7 1953 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.r6r461951.htm To Secure Justice in the Rosenberg Case William Reuben KF224.R6 R46 1951 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx.r6e31953.htm Suppressed Facts in the Rosenberg Case, The Irwin Edelman HX.R6 E3 1953 Sacco-Vanzetti Case http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s2v31926.htm Background of the Plymouth Trial Bartolomeo Vanzetti KF224.S2 V3 1926 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/nc1429.e4c31927.htm Case of Sacco & Vanzetti in Cartoons from The Daily Worker, The Fred Ellis NC1429.E4 C3 1927 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s2s32.htm Conspiracy Against Sacco & Vanzetti various KF224.S2 S32 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s2m351927.htm Decision of Gov. Alvan T. Fuller in the matter of the appeal of Bartolomeo Vanzetti & Nicola Sacco from sentence of death imposed under the laws of the commonwealth Gov. Allan T. Fuller KF224.S2 M35 1927 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hx846.c4m251937.htm Labor's Martyrs Vito Marcantonio HX846.C4 M25 1937 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s2a41i5.htm President A. L. Lowell of Harvard, President S. W. Stratton of M.I.T., Judge Robert Grant & Governor Fuller of Massachusetts in the presence of Vanzetti Bartolomeo Vanzetti KF224.S2 A41 I5 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s2s47.htm Sacco Vanzetti Case & The Grimm Forces, The Art. Shields KF224.S2 S47 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s2g6.htm Sacco~Vanzetti & The Red Peril Frank A. Goodwin KF224.S2 G6 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s2s35.htm Story of the Sacco-Vanzetti Case, The various KF224.S2 S35 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s2t4.htm Ten Questions That Have Never Been Answered! various KF224.S2 T4 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s2f55.htm There is justice: a summary of the Sacco-Vanzetti case. William Floyd, 1871-1943 KF224.S2 F55 Scottsboro Boys http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34p41933.htm Eight Who Lie in the Death House Paul Peters KF224.S34 P4 1933 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34f61937.htm Four free, five in prison, on the same evidence: what the nation's press says about the Scottsboro Case various KF224.S34 F6 1937 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34n61931.htm Lynching Negro Children in Southern Courts : (The Scottsboro Case) Joseph North KF224.S34 N6 1931 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s37m71934.htm Mr. President : Free the Scottsboro Boys various KF224.S37 M7 1934 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34w61933.htm Plea for Clemency In Negro Scottsboro Case, A Matthew Woll KF224.S34 W6 1933 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34h41937.htm Scottsboro Boys, The Angelo Herndon KF224.S34 H4 1937 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34a31936.htm Scottsboro Case, The Alabama Circuit Court KF224.S34 A3 1936 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34s351936.htm Scottsboro: A record of Broken Promise various KF224.S34 S35 1936 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf9329.z9s3651934.htm Scottsboro: Act Three Sasha Small KF9329.Z9 S365 1934 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34s361936.htm Scottsboro: The Shame of America various KF224.S34 S36 1936 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hv6565.a2a451933.htm Smash the Scottsboro Lynch Verdict James S. Allen HV6565.A2 A45 1933 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e185.61.h4371934.htm South Comes North, The Harry Haywood E185.61.H437 1934 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.h47l31934.htm Southern Welcome, A John Howard Lawson KF224.H47 L3 1934 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34s331933.htm Story of Scottsboro, The Isidor Schneider KF224.S34 S33 1933 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/kf224.s34l41932.htm They Shall Not Die! The Story of Scottsboro in Picture; Stop the Legal Lynching! various KF224.S34 L4 1932 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hv6568.n4u51943.htm United States Army "Scottsboro Case", A Vito Marcantonio & William H. Hastie HV6568.N4 U5 1943 Society for the Prevention of Asinine Student Movements http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/asininestudentmovements.htm Society for the Prevention of Asinine Student Movements AsinineStudentMovements Students for a Democratic Society http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hn90.r3a541963.htm America & the New Era various HN90.R3 A54 1963 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/hn90.r3s71968.htm Don't mourn, organize: SDS guide to community organizing. various HN90.R3 S7 1968 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e846.h351964.htm Liberal Analysis & Federal Power Tom Hayden E846.H35 1964 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/e840.4.n31966.htm National Vietnam Examination various E840.4 .N3 1966 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/la229.h31966.htm Student Social Action Tom Hayden LA229.H3 1966 http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/ds556.2.r671965.htm Vietnam Study Guide & Annotated Bibliography Steven J. Rosenthal DS556.2 .R67 1965

    [considering some of the personages mentioned above, one may ask Where are they now? (words not from MSU)

    Norman Thomas 1884-1968 perenial Socialist presidential candidate, accused of being CIA informer, presumably by the CIA

    Huey P. Newton -- killed during sidewalk crack transaction Oakland, California, a few years ago

    Bartolomeo Vanzetti, Nicola Sacco, Julius & Ethel Rosenberg, Scottsboro "boys" -- overdose of society

    Elridge Cleaver, former Moonie, anti-rent control not-sure-what Berkeley, California

    Tom Hayden, defendent in Chicago 7 conspiracy-to-cause-riot-at-1968- Democratic-Convention trial, has been forced to make a living as Senator, D-Los Angeles, California State Senate; now divorced from Famous Actress & fitness millionaire Hanoi Jane; official homepage: http://www.sen.ca.gov/htbin/senator_profile/hayden

    -- *** hansen@best.com http://www.cocktail.com *** * http://www.berkeleynetcentral.com/DrPseudocryptonym * * Dr Pseudocryptonym's Book Knowledge * *** & Hell's Bibliophiles, a 98% text-only website


    9001 -- Slums, Sleuths & Anarchists:

    Anarchist fiction

    Sims also wrote in another popular genre, Anarchist fiction. At the turn of the century the sinister Anarchist or Nihilist was a familiar figure in popular literature, reflecting middle-class fears about immigration & the growth of Socialism. Anarchism, Nihilism & Socialism were regarded by the bourgeoisie as virtually synonymous.

    Anarchists were rumoured to be active among the British working classes following the death of a supposed anarchist in an explosion at Greenwich Park in 1894, an incident which is now famous as the basis for Conrad's novel The Secret Agent (78). One of the contributors to Sims' Living London gave a sympathetic portrait of a "Socialistic gathering" (79) of Russians in East London, which appears to be of a social rather than Socialist nature, but such a tolerant view is relatively rare. By the turn of the century the sinister secret agent (usually of Eastern or Central European origin) was almost a cliché in popular fiction.

    Sims also deals with the secret service in some of his short stories. "Alec the Actor" (86) recounts the exploits of members of the "Anarchist's Club" in the East End. A group of criminal Anarchists plan a jewel robbery. They are ambushed by the police, but one of them, the eponymous Alec, escapes to Moscow where he then betrays a large number of his fellow Anarchists to the police. It transpires that he is in fact a police spy. the story is told from the point of view of his lover Anna Pertrovna, a Russian tailoress living in London. She believes Alec to be a genuine Anarchist. Although she is heavily pregnant, her Anarchist friends disown her when they discover Alec's true employment, thinking she must also be a spy, and she kills herself.

    In "Why He Was Hanged" (88) another beautiful young woman suffers as a result of her involvement with Anarchists and their suspicions. Esther Jakobowski is:

    "a member of that society which has its agents amongst the poorest daughters & amongst the richest butterflies of fashion, among the natives of every capital at home. She was in the pay of the Russian police - or, rather, she was suspected of being so.

    One day, this woman, who had been followed & watched by members of the society in London, was denounced at a meeting & condemned to death." (89)

    The message seems clear: women who involve themselves in revolutionary politics come to a sticky end.

    There appear to be two distinct sub-genres of Anarchist fiction. The first, which has strong links with slum fiction, is set among the working classes & echoes middle-class fears of a working-class revolution. Sims' short stories fall into this category, as does the best-known example of the genre, Conrad's The Secret Agent. The second has mainly middle or upper-class characters. In the latter, the beautiful adventuress of the sensation novel is relocated in a political context. Sims' Stella Barrasford is a direct descendant of Lady Audley & her ilk. The adventuress now looks for political as well as personal gain. Sexual & political immorality are often linked: the political adventuress is a glamourous woman who preys on men & has many lovers. This connection is also made in Sims' journalism: in London By Night he suggests that some foreign prostitutes working in London are in fact spies (92). The sexually assertive woman thus becomes a threat to the welfare of the State.

    76 Hermia Oliver: The International Anarchist Movement in Late Victorian London (Croom Helm/St Martins, 1983), pp 10-17 http://www.chriswillis.freeserve.co.uk/sims.htm


    9001 -- Politics

    Rather unusually, for someone involved in the mystical side of life, Zak Martin has strong political views, & does not hesitate to express them. He is a lifelong member of Sinn Fein & an active supporter of several other radical political organisations.

    In the 1970's he went to live in Germany, where he became involved in the anti nuclear movement (which later evolved into der grunen - the Green Party). He was arrested a number of times in Germany, & was eventually ordered to leave the country. He took refuge in the newly-established anarchist community of Christiania, in Denmark, from which he continued to make regular forays into Germany to take part in antinuclear protests.

    ZAK MARTIN - BRITAIN'S MAN OF MYSTERY

    This month we profile one of the psychic world's most controversial & enigmatic figures - clairvoyant, author, painter & musician, Zak Martin. Dublin-born Paul-Zachary Martin first came to public...

    Christiania

    At Christiania he was given the responsibility of organising a defense strategy for the commune. Christianites lived in constant fear of a dawn raid by Danish security forces, & Martin, a martial arts expert, gave daily lessons in self-defence to the commune's inhabitants.

    Baker Street In the 1980's Martin moved to London, where he established the London Psychic Centre on two floors of the exclusive Sherlock Holmes Hotel in London's Baker Street.

    http://www.ukpsychics.com/personalprofile.html


    9001 --


    Copyright © 1995 The Johns Hopkins University Press. All rights reserved. This work may be used, with this header included, for noncommercial purposes within a subscribed institution. No copies of this work may be distributed electronically outside of the subscribed institution, in whole or in part, without express written permission from the JHU Press.

    Reviews in American History 23.4 (1995) 704-709


    [Project Muse] [Search Page] [Sample 
Issues]


    THE LEFT & PUBLIC MEMORY

    Steven Biel

    Paul Avrich. Anarchist Voices: An Oral History of Anarchism in America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995. xiii 574 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, & index. $75.00.

    Griffin Fariello. Red Scare. Memories of the American Inquisition: An Oral History. New York: Norton, 1995. 575 pp. Notes, bibliography, & index. $29.95.

    Oral histories, for all their worth as primary sources, take on even greater value by defying instrumentality -- by protecting lived experience & memory from historians' arguments & narratives. In the historiography of the twentieth-century American Left, personal testimony serves as a counterweight to the tendency toward a kind of reverse Whiggism in which inevitable (or overdetermined) decline & defeat replace progress and triumph. Perhaps this reverse Whiggism is itself inevitable in any long view of radicalism's fortunes, especially when, at the century's end, an organized and powerful Left exists only in the persecution complexes, paranoid fantasies, and political demonology of the dominant Right. But political & labor historians have recently begun to recognize the dangers of what Robin L. Einhorn calls narratives of "irrevocable loss." "If we believe that the really important battles were irrevocably lost years ago," Einhorn writes, "there seems little reason to write history." George Lipsitz, Dana Frank, & others now urge their colleagues to stake out a middle ground between celebration and despair & to discover a place for contingency & hope in the stories they tell. 1

    The "D" words -- decline, defeat, disillusionment, despair -- certainly find their way into Paul Avrich's eloquent Anarchist Voices. "What would you think if I told you that anarchism is a pipe-dream?" asks Laurance Labadie, son of the anarchist printer & archivist Joseph A. Labadie (p. 16). Lena Shlakman, who read Kropotkin as a sixteen-year-old factory worker in Vilna & then saw him speak in New York, confessed after her 101st birthday that "now I am discouraged. I don't believe that 'it' -- the free society -- will ever come" (p. 328).

    Many of Avrich's subjects speak in generational terms. A [End Page 704] Spanish anarchist from Detroit regrets that the "movement and culture are gone, forgotten by the younger generation" (p. 400). "Anarchism was a movement of poor immigrants," observes a French anarchist who lived at the Mohegan Colony in Westchester. "As soon as the children made money, they lost anarchism" (p. 260). John J. Most, Jr., a Boston dentist & son of the famous German-American anarchist Johann Most, points out that his son, the legendary Boston Celtics broadcaster Johnny Most, "has no interest in anarchism whatever" (p. 19). In his introductions, Avrich himself notes the passing of anarchism from "movement" to "sect" to distant memory.

    What is most striking about Anarchist Voices, however, is the extent to which its subjects testify to kept rather than lost faith. By recording multiple voices, Avrich shows how individual lives often challenge or complicate historical generalizations. When anarchists tell their own stories, idealism is as much the keynote as disillusionment. "I have never seen a better or nobler idea," declares Bartolomeo Provo, a carpenter, World War I draft resister, and defender of Sacco & Vanzetti (p. 119). Provo's faith is echoed throughout the book by people in their eighties & nineties. Julius Seltzer & Attilio Bortolotti, both comrades of Emma Goldman in Toronto, state emphatically that they are not disillusioned (pp. 330, 188). Boris Yelensky, veteran of both the 1905 & 1917 Russian Revolutions, announces in his mid-nineties that "I'll remain an anarchist to the end" (p. 390).

    The reasons for this persistent idealism -- this defiance of reverse Whiggism -- can be found in the testimony as well. Avrich's book, with its emphasis on what he calls the "human dimension," reveals that anarchism was more than a political movement & program; it was, as Gussie Denenberg puts it, "a way of life" (p. 213). Reflecting on their whole lives, Avrich's subjects remember not only protests, strikes, bombings, harassment, imprisonment, and deportation but schools, newspapers, bookstores, lectures, performances, & picnics. Anarchist Voices, in other words, shows how the failure of the political movement obscures the successes of the ethical and cultural movement. As Avrich says & the interviews make clear, anarchists "created an alternative society" -- "a network of anarchist enclaves" -- "within the interstices of American capitalism" (pp. 318-19).

    These voices speak movingly of small occasions & everyday practices. They also recount some astonishingly adventurous lives. Frank Brand (Enrico Arrigoni), for example, was imprisoned as a deserter from the Italian army in World War I, tried to start a revolution in Switzerland, participated in the Spartacus uprising in Berlin, witnessed Béla Kun's Hungarian revolution, crossed by foot into the United States from Mexico, got deported back to Italy, entered the U.S. illegally again, worked as a lathe operator, housepainter, and bricklayer in New York, wrote articles for the anarchist press, & fought in [End Page 705] the Spanish Civil War. Most of these lives would have gone unrecorded without Avrich's remarkable work over the last twenty-five years. In his extraordinarily productive career, he has almost singlehandedly chronicled the diversity & vitality of American anarchism. Anarchist Voices, which he describes as his "most important" book, covers a variety of anarchist persuasions and ethnic groups. Collectivists, communists, individualists, mutualists, syndicalists, pacifists, Italians, Jews, Russians, Spanish, and Chinese all populate its pages. In "preserving for posterity the story of anarchists as they themselves have recalled it" (p. xii), Avrich has performed an invaluable service.

    "Posterity," of course, is an imprecise category, ranging from future "students & scholars" (p. xii) to the more elusive general reader. Concerned as it is with "public memory," oral history has an obligation to seek the broadest possible audience. It may be wishful thinking to want a significant nonscholarly audience for Anarchist Voices -- reviewers & specialists may be the only people who read oral histories cover to cover -- but the collection itself works against a wider appeal by including enough dull interviews to detract from the many compelling ones. On a number of occasions, it becomes evident that these interviews were not intended for an oral history; they were conducted to seek specific information for whatever book Avrich was working on at the time. This is even reflected in the structure of Anarchist Voices; several sections, especially those on Sacco & Vanzetti and anarchist schools and colonies, could serve as appendixes to his previous books. (There may be no better evidence of Avrich's productivity & diversity than the appearance of at least one of his books in the bibliographies for five out of the six sections of Anarchist Voices: Pioneers, Emma Goldman, Sacco and Vanzetti, Schools and Colonies, & Ethnic Anarchists.) The book's inclusiveness is undoubtedly a product of Avrich's admirable preservationist impulses, and most of the interviews are fluid & expansive despite the research agendas that helped shape them. A less exhaustive volume, however, might have invited more of the uninitiated into the rich anarchist past that Avrich has so brilliantly & devotedly explored over the years.

    Griffin Fariello makes clear from the start that he intends for Red Scare to reach the "many Americans" for whom "only the barest sketch of the era remains, or nothing at all" (p. 23). Fariello's evidence for Americans' ignorance of the witch hunts may be shaky (three anecdotes about personal acquaintances who come across as exceptionally dense), but it is hard to underestimate collective amnesia these days. While Red Scare covers familiar scholarly ground -- the purges of the State Department, Hollywood, labor unions, & universities -- & features some familiar characters -- Joseph Rauh, Alger Hiss, Steve Nelson, Dorothy Healey, Arthur Miller, Pete Seeger, [End Page 706] Linus Pauling -- it makes no pretense of challenging the historiography or filling a niche in the scholarship. Fariello is explicitly concerned with public memory; his aim is "to rescue a chapter of history from our habitual 'forgettery'" (p. 25). Scholars may know that "McCarthyism" was much more than the work of one indisputably bad man, that the strangely beloved Harry Truman initiated the purges, & that the Red Scare eroded the Bill of Rights, narrowed the political spectrum, & ruined people's lives. Fariello takes up the worthy task of insuring that these things become common knowledge.

    Like all good oral histories, Red Scare succeeds in its "rescue" mission by transforming McCarthyism from a historical abstraction into personal experience. The power of these recollections comes from their resistance to stereotypes. "If there's any value to this kind of colloquy you're having," remarks the blacklisted actor Jeff Corey, "I hope it lets people know we're really quite human" (p. 288). Paul Jarrico, producer of the legendary strike film Salt of the Earth, warns Fariello "to be careful not to picture the casualties" of the Red Scare "simply as victims" (p. 283). Fariello takes their advice. In his introductions, he chronicles the lost jobs & lost lives. In his interviews, he lets the subjects convey more than victimhood. After all, these are survivors, & they have lived to see the irony, as the Weavers' Fred Hellerman puts it, of "having been blacklisted" becoming "a badge of honor" (p. 370).

    In the aggregate, the period was an unmitigated disaster for the Left -- to argue otherwise would be perverse -- but individual lives again defy broad generalizations. Red Scare illuminates many acts of resistance, from fighting back through the courts to fighting back through humor. The China hand John Stewart Service recalls his 1957 Supreme Court victory and his principled decision to return to the diplomatic corps, even in a dead-end job: "It was frustrating, years & years, the whole business of getting through the courts. But eventually I won, & so I did as I'd planned to do: I went back to the government, much to the government's horror!" (p. 164). Oscar Shaftel, a professor at Queens College, pleaded the First, Fifth, Seventh, & Fourteenth Amendments before the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee, only to hear a senator respond, "We don't recognize the First Amendment in this committee" (p. 430). Fired from his teaching position, he wrote under a pseudonym for window & roofing trade magazines & did not return to Queens until 1973. Shaftel eventually won an apology from the college and a pension, which he donated anonymously for CCNY student scholarships. Jack O'Dell, blacklisted out of the merchant marine on the West Coast, joined the civil rights movement in the South, resigned from the SCLC under pressure from J. Edgar Hoover & the Kennedys, & ended up as an editor at Freedomways. Dorothy Healey, whose Smith Act indictment was withdrawn after five years of legal battles, believes that she won revenge on the FBI for tapping her [End Page 707] mother's phone: "I always thought that God had punished them, because they listened to all her phone calls, & my mother could go on for hours!" (p. 225). Here the long view reveals resiliency and determination, moral & even political victories.

    Fariello captures the Red Scare's human complexity by presenting what he announces as "a mosaic of voices from both sides of the Great Fear" (p. 25). Some of the most chilling testimony appears in the "Hounds" section, where the State Department "security" enforcer Peter Szluk & the professional witness Harvey Matusow discuss the personal motives for doing the day-today work of persecution. 2 Some of the most poignant testimony belongs to those who named names. Forty years later, the composer David Raksin still agonizes over his wrenching decision to inform on people already known to HUAC while protecting others who had not yet been named. "I am not sure that it would have done humanity any good if I had destroyed myself," he reasons (p. 313). His committee testimony was not "the same as all those other abject belly-scrapings" (p. 314), yet he has never forgiven himself. M. Brewster Smith, a psychologist at the Social Science Research Council in 1953, finally confronted the full extent of his collaboration when he requested his testimony under the Freedom of Information Act. "When I finally mustered up the courage," he recalls, "I saw why I didn't want to: I saw the very unheroic role that I played" (p. 446).

    If, as Ring Lardner, Jr. remarks, "you can't really say the decision not to be a shit is heroic" (p. 266), these voices suggest that the decision to be a shit was not unambiguously villainous. To recognize the humanity of individuals in an agonizing situation, as Red Scare does so magnificently, is not to apologize for injustice but to witness how injustice exacts its claims. Red Scare 's finest achievement may be its success in combining historical and moral responsibility, documenting & bearing witness at the same time.

    Whatever limited impact most of us have on public memory comes through our teaching rather than our scholarship. Frank Tarloff, a blacklisted screenwriter, now gives talks to college students. To them, he says, the Red Scare is "an academic thing" until he comes along and explains that "I was part of it. I lived through this." When they hear his story, "it's a revelation" (p. 326). Anarchist Voices & Red Scare both deserve to reach beyond our studies & classrooms. But they certainly need to reach our students -- to let them see history not only in its broad movement & sweep, but also in the lives of individuals as they negotiate its difficult terrain. The testimony in these books shows people living history in the fullest sense, struggling to be its subjects, even in small ways, rather than its objects alone.

    Steven Biel, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University, is the author of Independent Intellectuals in the United States, 1910-1945 (1992) & is currently completing Down With the Old Canoe: A Cultural History of the Titanic Disaster.


    Endnotes

    1. Robin L. Einhorn, "Give Me an 'L,'" Nation 254 (January 27, 1992): 101. See, for example, the conclusions in George Lipsitz, Rainbow at Midnight: Labor & Culture in the 1940s (1994); & Dana Frank, Purchasing Power: Consumer Organizing, Gender, & the Seattle Labor Movement, 1919-1929 (1994).

    2. The blacklisted high school teacher Frances Eisenberg reports a particularly sordid instance of personal vendettas fueling red-baiting. The mother of one of her students, Lyn Nofziger (later an aide to Presidents Nixon & Reagan), may have used her influence with Jack Tenney of the California Un-American Activities Committee to get even with Eisenberg for giving young Lyn a B in journalism class (p. 460).




    9001 --

    LOVE, LITERATURE, & POLITICS IN THE MACHINE AGE

    Lynn Dumenil

    Douglas Clayton. Floyd Dell: The Life & Times of an American Rebel. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1994. xv 335 pp. Photographs, notes, & index. $30.00.

    In the years shortly before World War I, New York's Greenwich Village was a vibrant community of mostly young intellectuals enthralled with what one of them, Max Eastman, called a "universal revolt or regeneration, of the just-before-dawn of a new day in American art & literature and living-of-life as well as in politics." 1 A tenuous sense of coherence united a wide spectrum of people, including such luminaries as John Reed, Emma Goldman, Randolph Bourne, Walter Lippmann, & Margaret Sanger, who congregated at the offices of exciting little magazines like Seven Lively Arts & The Masses or met at the famous salon of Mabel Dodge Luhan to debate socialism, birth control, feminism, free love, Freud, modern art & literature. The village was not only the scene of experimental theater & art, but also of experiments in living -- as the young radicals pursued an unconventional life style that flew in the face of bourgeois respectability.

    With Floyd Dell: The Life & Times of an American Rebel, Douglas Clayton provides a useful addition to our understanding of the men and women who shaped this exciting cultural moment. Although Clayton surprisingly makes no reference to any other scholar's account of Dell, his eagerness to prove Dell's seriousness of purpose & intellect seems to have been designed to correct negative views of his subject, such as Leslie Fishbein's 2 largely critical assessment of Dell as inconsistent & narcissistic. Clayton presents his subject as a literary & social critic of unusual merit and originality, a major contributor to the shape & quality of The Masses, and a novelist of critical and popular acclaim. He further argues that even after Dell ceased to be at the center of American intellectual life (by the mid 1920s), he nonetheless continued to be a serious intellectual who continually grappled with the questions that had concerned him for decades: the contradictions between a life dedicated to art & one dedicated to radical politics; between a life in search of a stable home life & one committed to literature and individual self expression. [End Page 699]

    Clayton's account is particularly engaging as he traces Dell's early life in the Midwest, where he was born in Barry, Illinois in 1887. The recurring depressions of the late nineteenth century had a devastating impact on his family, which laid the groundwork for Dell's socialism. He was also deeply moved by literature, & thus early on the intertwining of art & radical politics shaped his ideas & character. These interests found fuller expression when he moved to Chicago in 1908 & quickly made a name for himself as a literary critic for The Friday Literary Review, a supplement to The Evening Post. It was also in Chicago that Dell adopted his bohemian life style, constructing an unconventional, "feminist" marriage with Margery Currey. Dell's "credo of self-expression" eventually led to numerous openly conducted affairs that put a strain on his marriage, which failed shortly before his move to New York & to Greenwich Village.

    When he arrived in 1913, the rebellion was already in full swing, but Dell seems to have made his mark quickly. As associate editor of The Masses, he expanded the literature review & reinforced the exciting directions Eastman was taking the magazine as "an attention-grabbing hodgepodge of radical politics & culture, with criticism, fiction, & artwork, much of it shot through with irreverence & an irascible, satiric spirit" (p. 110). Dell was active in the founding of the Provincetown Players, the theater group that was to transform significantly American theater. At the same time, he embarked on a long-term live-in relationship with photographer Marjorie Jones. After that affair broke up, he conducted a number of romances, among the most passionate, with Edna St. Vincent Millay. His sexual exploits, coupled with his eager embrace of Freudianism that Dell & others interpreted primarily as a struggle against repression, made him a mascot of the bohemian revolt against village conformity & respectability.

    Historians have long recognized the impact World War I and the Red Scare had in destroying the optimism of the prewar radicals, and in splintering the Left & shattering the alliance of politics & art. Clayton argues that these catastrophic events were not especially significant for Dell's future course, despite the fact that he, along with six other Masses colleagues, was unsuccessfully tried under the Espionage Act in 1918 for outspoken criticism of the war. According to Clayton, far more important to Dell's postwar trajectory was his psychoanalysis, which he embarked on in 1916 with the explicit aim of helping him with his work & in his search for a stable relationship: "I wanted to be set free to love deeply enough to get married and have children; and I wanted to find in myself the powers necessary for completing my novel" (pp. 139-40).

    He achieved both. He married pacifist Berta Marie Gage in 1919 and published his first novel, Mooncalf, in 1920. The couple quickly moved out of [End Page 700] the village and, at Dell's insistence, built a home in Croton-on-Hudson. Although this physical distancing from the village seems to have been accompanied by a parallel distancing from his earlier radical concerns in favor of a life devoted primarily to literature and domesticity, Clayton insists that Dell maintained his commitment to politics and radicalism, not only in the 1920s, but until he died in 1969. Clayton makes a convincing case for Dell's resisting the disillusionment so often associated with the 1920s intellectual. In one of his major works, a series of essays originally entitled "Literature and the Machine Age" (1922-23), he was particularly critical of modernist trends of the postwar years, especially the despair and alienation they embodied: "Facing an ironic doom which it feels powerless to avert... the intelligentsia of our time has for the most part put aside with a kind of shame its broken & shattered ideals, & has confessed its hopelessness by the very nature of its new esthetic & intellectual interests" (pp. 211-12).

    Another indication that Dell does not fit the stereotype of the alienated postwar intellectual was the message in his own novels. Ironically, the autobiographical Mooncalf enjoyed critical acclaim and widespread popularity, in part Dell realized, because the public mistakenly identified its protagonist, Felix Fay, as a symbol of alienated youth frustrated by the repressive midwestern culture. In fact, Dell had intended to criticize Fay's "moon-calfishness," his aimlessness, his self-imposed alienation. In subsequent novels, none of which achieved the same popularity as his first effort, Dell took pains to make his point clearer as the protagonists achieved personal maturity & adjustment through marriage & the family. He also explored this theme in his nonfiction, especially Love & the Machine Age: A Psychological Study of the Transitions from Patriarchal Society (1930). Here, Dell focused on the damage done by a key institution of capitalism: the repressive patriarchal family, while optimistically viewing companionate marriage and a new family structure, based on sexual equality & democracy, as the hope for the future.

    Clayton offers some criticisms of Dell's analysis in Love and the Machine Age, noting its regressive approach to homosexuality and commenting that its feminism was tempered by an insistence that women's major role was as homemaker & mother. He calls this stance on women "surprising" given Dell's longstanding commitment to women's equality, but it is not surprising at all. Clayton himself noted that from its earliest inception, there were limits to Dell's feminism. In an early collection of essays, Women as World Builders (1913), for example, Dell often took a condescending tone, and emphasized that men wanted liberated women because they "promise to be more fun" (p. 78). & in his relationships he was more likely to honor the ideal rather than the practice of equality. Clayton's assessment here would have benefited [End Page 701] greatly by drawing upon other scholars' insights into the limits of feminism among the radicals. Ellen Kay Trimberger's "Feminism, Men, and Modern Love: Greenwich Village, 1900-1925," is just one account that helps to unravel the ambiguities of early feminism. 3 Similarly, the conservative quality of the much touted companionate marriage of the 1920s has been addressed by numerous historians whose work Clayton seems to have ignored.

    As for Dell's continuing engagement in politics, Clayton argues convincingly that Dell maintained an interest in politics after his days at The Masses, but perhaps not as consistently as Clayton suggests. Nor does he offer much analysis of the content of that politics. We need a better sense of how the man who had been a supporter of the Bolshevik Revolution made his peace with working for the New Deal as a writer & administrator for the WPA. Clayton insists that this was in keeping with Dell's lifelong vision of "liberal socialist reform," but he does not offer much of a sense of Dell's perception of the New Deal, or how much his vision had changed from his earlier days in Greenwich Village. As in other instances in the book, the analysis would have been strengthened had Clayton drawn upon other scholars who have examined the mix of radicals, liberals, & conservatives who helped to shape New Deal programs.

    In the post-World War II era, Dell published little but was a prolific writer of letters. Especially interesting were those that he wrote criticizing his old friend & colleague, Max Eastman, during the McCarthy witchhunt era. By the 1950s, Eastman had shed his dogmatic Marxism of the 1920s & swung to the right, giving his enthusiastic support to McCarthy, a position that dismayed Dell considerably. The comparison with Eastman is an important one for Clayton. One of his major points about Dell is that he avoided the pitfalls that ensnared many radical Marxists by eschewing any systematic dogma, instead adhering to what Clayton terms his "determined branch of liberal, democratic, unsystematic leftism" (p. 294).

    This emphasis on the virtue of being unsystematic sometimes presents problems for Clayton's assessment of Dell as an intellectual. In one instance, for example, Clayton notes that Dell published in 1926 Love in Greenwich Village, which expressed nostalgia for the rebellion and escapism of the colorful prewar bohemian days. But, at the same time, he was preparing the manuscript for "Literature & the Machine Age," in which he "unbraided a whole tradition of literary dreamers & escapists" (p. 232). Clayton acknowledges the contradiction as "strange" & chalks it up to irony, but his analysis throughout would have been more persuasive if he had seemed less eager to minimize the inconsistencies he himself points out.

    A clear sense of Clayton's own sympathies with his subject pervades this book, yet he offers no insights into the writing of the biography itself or his [End Page 702] sense of relationship with Dell. As a traditional biography it is hardly fair to demand that the author take on the postmodern imperative of overtly inserting his own persona into the text. However, it does seem reasonable to expect him to share with the readers an assessment of the sources. The book has brief citations for direct quotations, but no textual notes or discussion of primary sources. This absence seems especially problematic in biography. Dell, a highly reflective man, left an extensive literary legacy, including much autobiographical material, which as many biographers have ruefully acknowledged, can be a highly misleading source. Clayton, however, does not offer any hint as to how he evaluated Dell's own assessment of his life. The omission of a comment on the sources, along with the minimal reference to any other scholar, does not indicate that the book was poorly researched. But rather suggests that it was aimed at a general, rather than academic audience; the latter will find the lacuna puzzling if not frustrating. Despite the shortcomings, this is a useful book. By tracing the complex evolution of an important prewar radical, Clayton contributes to our picture of the intellectuals who shaped the modern era.

    Lynn Dumenil, Department of History, Occidental College, is the author of The Modern Temper: American Culture & Society in the 1920s (1995).


    Endnotes

    1. Eugene E. Leach, "The Radicals of The Masses," in Adele Heller and Lois Rudnick, eds., 1915, the Cultural Moment: The New Politics, the New Woman, the New Psychology, the New Art and the New Theatre in America (1991), p. 28.

    2. Leslie Fishbein, Rebels in Bohemia: The Radicals of The Masses, 1911-1917 (1982).

    3. In Ann Snitow, Christine, Stansell, & Sharon Thompson, eds., Powers of Desire: The Politics of Sexuality (1983), pp. 131-52.


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Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - COFO (Teachers' Kit) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - COFO (Volunteers' Kit) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Evers, Charles Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Freedom Schools Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Freedom Summer Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Lomax Poll Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - McGee, Willy Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Medgar Evers Fund Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Mississippi Community Foundation Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (1 of 3) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (2 of 3) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (3 of 3) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Mississippi Freedom School Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Mississippi Parents Association Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Poor Peoples Corporation Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Poor Peoples' Fund Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Project "Mississippi" Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Tchula Seven Civil Liberties - Negroes - Mississippi - Till, Emmett Civil Liberties - Negroes - Missouri - Johnson, J. B. Civil Liberties - Negroes - Music Civil Liberties - Negroes - NAACP (1 of 3) Civil Liberties - Negroes - NAACP (2 of 3) Civil Liberties - Negroes - NAACP (3 of 3) Civil Liberties - Negroes - NAACP - Women Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Alliance Against Racist & Political Oppression Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Black Arts Festival Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Black Silent Majority Committee Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Black Survival Find Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Black United Fund Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Committee to Defend Negro Leadership Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Legal Defense Fund Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Negro Congress Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Sharecroppers Fund Civil Liberties - Negroes - National Student Coalition Against Racism Civil Liberties - Negroes - Nebrasaka - Rice Poindexter Case Civil Liberties - Negroes - Negro History Week Civil Liberties - Negroes - Negro Universities Press Civil Liberties - Negroes - New Jersey (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - New Jersey (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - New Jersey - Camden Defense Committee Civil Liberties - Negroes - New Jersey - Carter, Rubin (Hurricane) Civil Liberties - Negroes - New Jersey - Plainfield Joint Defense Committee (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - New Jersey - Plainfield Joint Defense Committee (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - New Jersey - Riots Civil Liberties - Negroes - New York Civil Liberties - Negroes - New York - "Harlem Six" (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - New York - "Harlem Six" (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - New York - Hooks - Robert E. Civil Liberties - Negroes - New York - Johnson, Kenneth Civil Liberties - Negroes - New York - New York City - Ahmad, Mohammed Civil Liberties - Negroes - New York - New York City - Ahmad, Mohammed Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina - Little Joanne Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina - Monroe Case Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina - Monroe Case - CAMD: Information Bulletin Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina - Monroe Case - Monroe Defense Committee (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina - Monroe Case - Monroe Defense Committee (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina - North Carolina Political Prisoners Committee Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina - Wilmington 10 Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina: CAMD (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - North Carolina: CAMD (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Ohio Civil Liberties - Negroes - Operation Freedom Civil Liberties - Negroes - Organizations Civil Liberties - Negroes - Parks, Gordon Civil Liberties - Negroes - Parks, Rosa Civil Liberties - Negroes - Patrice Lumumba Coalition Civil Liberties - Negroes - Pendleton 14 Civil Liberties - Negroes - Pennsylvania Civil Liberties - Negroes - Pennsylvania - Abu-Jamal, Mumia Civil Liberties - Negroes - Poems & Songs Civil Liberties - Negroes - Poetry - Hayden, Robert Civil Liberties - Negroes - Polite, Carlene Hatcher Civil Liberties - Negroes - Poll Tax Civil Liberties - Negroes - Poor People's March Civil Liberties - Negroes - Push to Excel Civil Liberties - Negroes - Race Relations Information Center Civil Liberties - Negroes - Randolph, A. Philip Civil Liberties - Negroes - Religion Civil Liberties - Negroes - Robeson, Paul Paul Robeson Civil Liberties - Negroes - Rustin, Bayard Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. (1 of 5) Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. (2 of 5) Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. (3 of 5) Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. (4 of 5) Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. (5 of 5) Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. Newsletter Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. Newsreleases (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. Newsreleases (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. Reprints (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - S.N.C.C. Reprints (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Sanchez, Sonia Civil Liberties - Negroes - Scholarship, Education an d Defense Fund for Racial Equality, Inc. Civil Liberties - Negroes - Schuyler, George S. Civil Liberties - Negroes - Schuyler, Philppa Duke Civil Liberties - Negroes - Simpson, O.J. Civil Liberties - Negroes - Sit-ins Civil Liberties - Negroes - Sit-ins: CORE Civil Liberties - Negroes - Songs Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Christian Leadership Conference (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Christian Leadership Conference (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Conference Educational Fund (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Conference Educational Fund (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Legal Action Movement Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Negro Youth Congress Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Poverty Law Center (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Poverty Law Center (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Regional Council (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Regional Council: [1963 Summary] (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Student Organizing Committee (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Southern Student Organizing Committee (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Sowell, Thomas Civil Liberties - Negroes - Stamps Civil Liberties - Negroes - Taconic Foundation Civil Liberties - Negroes - Tennessee Civil Liberties - Negroes - Tennessee - Committee to Free Robert Arnold Civil Liberties - Negroes - Tennessee - Fisk University Civil Liberties - Negroes - Tennessee: Haywood & Fayette Counties Civil Liberties - Negroes - Texas - Johnson, Lee Otis (1 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Texas - Johnson, Lee Otis (2 of 2) Civil Liberties - Negroes - Texas - University Civil Liberties - Negroes - Texas 5 Civil Liberties - Negroes - Thomas, Clarence Civil Liberties - Negroes - United Negro College Fundd Civil Liberties - Negroes - Urban League Civil Liberties - Negroes - Van Peebles, Melvin Civil Liberties - Negroes - Virginia Civil Liberties - Negroes - Virginia- Martinsville Case Civil Liberties - Negroes - Virginia - Carrington, James Civil Liberties - Negroes - Virginia - Wansley, Thomas Civil Liberties - Negroes - Voting Civil Liberties - Negroes - Washington, Booker Taliaferro, 1856-1915 Civil Liberties - Negroes - Wells Barnett, Ida B. 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S. Colonialism & Imperialism - Africa - South Africa - South Africa Committee Colonialism & Imperialism - Africa - TransAfrika Colonialism & Imperialism - Africa - Washington Office on Africa Colonialism & Imperialism - Africa - Zimbabwe Colonialism & Imperialism - Africa (General) Colonialism & Imperialism - Asia - Asia Monetary Resource Center Colonialism & Imperialism - Asia - C.C.A.S. (Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars) Colonialism & Imperialism - Asia - South Asia - Bangladesh Colonialism & Imperialism - Asia - Southeast Asia - East Timor Colonialism & Imperialism - Asia - Southeast Asia - Indonesia Colonialism & Imperialism - Asia - Southeast Asia - Philippines Colonialism & Imperialism - Asia - Southeast Asia - Philippines - Partido Komunita Ng Pilipinas Colonialism & Imperialism - Asia - Southeast Asia - Philippines - Phillipines Research Center Colonialism & Imperialism - Asia - Taiwan Colonialism & Imperialism - Calenders Colonialism & Imperialism - Campaign for a Democratic Foreign Policy Colonialism & Imperialism - Caribbean & the Guyanas Colonialism & Imperialism - Caribbean & the Guyanas - Grenada Colonialism & Imperialism - Caribbean & the Guyanas - Haiti Colonialism & Imperialism - Caribbean & the Guyanas - Puerto Rico Colonialism & Imperialism - Caribbean & the Guyanas - Puerto Rico - Fuerzas Armadas de Liberacion Nacional Puertoriquena Colonialism & Imperialism - Caribbean & the Guyanas - Puerto Rico - Puerto Rican Committee Against Repression Colonialism & Imperialism - Caribbean & the Guyanas - Puerto Rico - Puerto Rican Solidarity Organization Colonialism & Imperialism - Casement, Roger Colonialism & Imperialism - Cooperation in Documentation & Communication (CDC) Colonialism & Imperialism - Institute for Food & Development Policy Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Brazil Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Office of the Americas Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Ad Hoc for a July Second Emergency Mobilization Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Americans for Democracy in Latin America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Americas Watch Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights in Latin America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Arias Peace Plan Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Bibliography Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Bolivia Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Central America Education Fund Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Central America Solidarity Association Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Central America Solidarity Committee Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Central American Peace & Democracy Watch Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Chile Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Coalition for Democracy in Latin America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Coalition for Jobs, Peace, & Freedom in the Americas Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Coaltion for Peace in Central America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Colombia http://www.lib.umich.edu/spec-coll/labadie/labsvfthmtst2.txt


    9001 -- Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Committee to Defend Human Rights Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Common Front for Latin America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Costa Rica Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Council on Hemispheric Affairs Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Detroit Area Coalition for Central America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Disarm Education Fund Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Ecumenical Program for Inter-American Communication & Action Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - El Salvador (1 of 2) Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - El Salvador (2 of 2) Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - El Salvador - CARP Committee to Save El Salvador Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - El Salvador - Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CSPES) Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - El Salvador - El Salvador Archives Project Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - El Salvador - FMLN - FDR Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - El Salvador - Medical Aid to El Salvador Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - El Salvador - New El Salvador Today Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - El Salvador/Nicaragua Defense Fund Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Friends of the Americas Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Guatemala Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Guatemala - Committe in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Guatemala - Guatemala Human Rights Commission Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Guatemala - Guatemala Partners Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Guatemala - U.S/Guatemala Labor Education Project Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Honduras Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - June 18 Coalition Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Labor Network on Central America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Latin America Solidarity Committee Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Latin AMerican Task Force Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Madre Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Marazul Tours Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Michigan Interfaith Committe for Human Rights in Central America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Michigan Mobilization Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - National Committe for Peace in Central America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Neighbor to Neighbor Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - New Movement in Solidarity with the Puerto Rican & Mexican Revolutions Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua (1 of 2) Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua (2 of 2) Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Catholic Church Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Comision Permanente para Derechos Humanes Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - 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Latin America - Nicaragua - Nicaragua Information Center Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Nicaragua Medical Aid Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Nicaragua Network Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Nicaraguan Democratic Force Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - North, Oliver Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Political Prisoners Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Project Renewal Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Puebla Institute Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Pursell 118 Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Rescue Task Force Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Sister City Task Force Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Unified Nicaraguan Opposition Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Nicaragua - Women Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - North American Congress on Latin America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Orbis Books Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Organization in Solidarity with Central America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Panama Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Paraguay Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - People's Anti-War Mobilization Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Peru Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Pledge of Resistance Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Pro-Democratic Coalition in Latin America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Pueblo to People Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Quixote Center - Quest for Peace Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Religious Task Force on Central America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - U.S.L.A. Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - U.S.L.A. Justice Committee Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - United States Out of Central America Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Washington Center for Central American Studies Colonialism & Imperialism - Latin America - Witness for Peace Colonialism & Imperialism - Liberation (London) Colonialism & Imperialism - Movement for Colonial Freedom Colonialism & Imperialism - Nestle Boycott Colonialism & Imperialism - North America Colonialism & Imperialism - North America - Canada - Our Generation Kit Colonialism & Imperialism - North America - Canada - Quebec - Our Generation Kit Colonialism & Imperialism - North America - Canadian Liberation Movement Colonialism & Imperialism - Oceania (1 of 2) Colonialism & Imperialism - Oceania (2 of 2) Colonialism & Imperialism - Oxford Committee for Famine Relief Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - Black Americans to Support Israel Committee Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - Jewish Committe on the Middle East Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - Jewish Peace Lobby Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - Jewish Peace Lobby Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - League for Peace with Justice in Palestine Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - Middle East Resource Center Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - National Association of Arab Americans Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - November 29 Committee for Palestine Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - Palestine Aid Society of America Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - Palestine Human Rights Campaign Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - Palestine Solidarity Committe Colonialism & Imperialism - Palestine - Teach-in - Ann Arbor - March 1995 Colonialism & Imperialism - Poetry Colonialism & Imperialism - Singlaub Freedom Foundation Colonialism & Imperialism - Third World First Columbia Comic Books Comic Strips Coming Age Common Cause Communism - Albania Communism - Anti-Communism Communism - Anti-Communism - Congress for Cultural Freedom Communism - Anti-Communism - 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Communism - Russia - Molotoy, Vyacheslav Communism - Russia - Moscow Trials Communism - Russia - Religion Communism - Russia - Samizdat Communism - Russia - Satellite Countries - Czechoslovakia - Our Generation Kit Communism - Russia - Stalin, Joseph Communism - Russia - Trotsky, Leon Communism - Russia - Ukraine Communism - Russia - Wellfare State Communism - Russia - Women & Family Communism - Southeast Asia Communism - Southeast Asia - Vietnam Communism - U.S. - AIMS Communism - U.S. - Allerton Coops Communism - U.S. - Amter, Israel Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism (1 of 2) Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism (2 of 2) Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - Clergymen's Committee on China Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - Committee of One Million Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - Dilling Elizabeth Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - Freedom Studies Center Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - ICFTUE Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - Katyn Memorial Fund Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - Kazan, Elia Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - Tenney, Jack B. Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - The Truth, Inc. Communism - U.S. - Anti-Communism - U.S. Citizens for a Free Cuba Communism - U.S. - Black Women's United Front Communism - U.S. - Cacchione, Peter J. Communism - U.S. - Committee of Correspondence Communism - U.S. - Communism in Labor Unions Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - American League for Peace & Democracy Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - Fund for Public Information Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - International Labor Defence (see also: Deportations - International Labor Defense) Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - International Labor Defense Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - International Labor Defense - California Red Flag Case Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - International Labor Defense - Herndon Emergency Fund Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - International Labor Defense - Prisoners Relief Fund Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - International Labor Defense - Scottsboro New Trial Emergency Fund Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - League of American Writers Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - National Council of American Soviet Friendship Communism - U.S. - Communist Fronts - World Congress of Youth Against War & Fascism Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Abrams, Jacob - Amnesty Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - All Points of View Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Allen, James S. Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - American Youth Festival Committee Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Arizona Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Auto Industry Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Beal, Fred Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Bloor, "Mother" Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Browder, Earl Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - California Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Cards, Posters, etc. Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Conventions - Bridgman, Michigan Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Eastern Seaboard Conference of Communist Youth Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Elections Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Foster, William Z. Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Friends of Spanish Democracy Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - General Committee Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Hall, Gus Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Hearst, William R. Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Informers Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Left Opposition Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Lightfoot, Claude Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Maritime Unions Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Membership Cards Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Mexican-Americans Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Michigan Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Michigan - Detroit Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Michigan - Detroit - Workers' Educational Association Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Minor, Robert Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Minor, Robert - Cartoons Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Mitchell, Charlene Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - National Convention Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - National Hunger March Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - National Student League Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - New York Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - New York State Committee Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Official Records Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Opposition Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Sedition Trials - Jenkins, Grady & Judy Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Socialist Opposition Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Songs Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - St. Louis Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Strikes - General Motors - 1937 Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Workers Party Communism - U.S. - Communist Party - Young Communist League Communism - U.S. - communist Party - Youth Communism - U.S. - Communist Party (General) - See Also: Free Speech Cases (1 of 2) Communism - U.S. - Communist Party (General) - See Also: Free Speech Cases (2 of 2) Communism - U.S. - Communist Political Association Communism - U.S. - Davis, Angela Communism - U.S. - Davis, Benjamin J. Communism - U.S. - Dennis, Eugene & Peggy Communism - U.S. - Gellert, Hugo Communism - U.S. - Gold, Michael Communism - U.S. - Herbst, Josephine Communism - U.S. - Historians of American Communism Communism - U.S. - History Communism - U.S. - International Publishers Communism - U.S. - John Reed Clubs Communism - U.S. - Jones, Claudia Communism - U.S. - LeSueur, Meridel Communism - U.S. - Lovestone, Jay Communism - U.S. - Marxist Educational Publications Communism - U.S. - Marzani, Carl Communism - U.S. - New Masses Communism - U.S. - New Outlook Publishers Communism - U.S. - Patterson, William L. Communism - U.S. - Political Platforms Communism - U.S. - Reed, John Communism - U.S. - Reference Center for Marxist Studies Communism - U.S. - Rhode Island Communism - U.S. - Richmond, Al Communism - U.S. - Rosenberg Case Communism - U.S. - Russo-German Treaty of 1939 Communism - U.S. - Sedition Trials Communism - U.S. - Sobell Case Communism - U.S. - Soviets Communism - U.S. - Stokes, Rose Pastor Communism - U.S. - Straight, Michael Communism - U.S. - Sutta, Burt Communism - U.S. - Whitney, Charlotte Anita Communism - U.S. - Yates, Oleta O'Connor Communism - U.S. - Young Workers' Liberation League Communism - Women & Family Communism - World Festival of Youth & Students Communism - Yugoslavia Community Press Features Confederate States of America Conference for Progressive Political Action Conference on Economic Progress Congrès Coopératif National Conrad, Joseph Conroy, Jack Conservatism - American Council of Trustees & Alumni Conservatism - Buchanan, Patrick J. Conservatism - Buckley, William F. Conservatism - Great Britain Conservatism - Heartland Institute Conservatism - Judicial Watch Conservatism - Michigan - Hillsdale College (1 of 2) Conservatism - Michigan - Hillsdale College (2 of 2) Conservatism - Promise Keepers Conspiracy Theories Constitution - U.S. (parody) Constitutional Money Alliance Constitutional Money League of America Consumer Education & Protection Consumer Education & Protection - Environmental Action Foundation Consumer Education & Protection - Institute for Local Self-Reliance Consumer Education & Protection - Michigan Citizens Lobby Consumer Education & Protection - Nader, Ralph Consumer Education & Protection - Public Citizen Consumer Education & Protection - Public Interest Research Group in Michigan Continental Congress of Workers & Farmers Cooke, Edmund Vance Cooper Union Coors Boycott Copland, Aaron Copyright Cortez, Carlos Costa Rica Council Against Intolerance in America Council for a Volunteer Military Council for Democracy Council for Responsible Dialogue Council for the National Interest Counterculture - Beat Generation Counterculture - Hippies & Bohemians Counterculture - Hippies & Bohemians - Diggers Counterculture - Hippies & Bohemians - Posters Counterculture - Hippies & Bohemians - Rainbow Family Counterculture - International Counterculture Archive Counterculture - Music - Rock Against Racism Cowell, Henry Coxey, Jacob S. 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Elections Ely, Richard T. English as the Official Language Erfurt, John C. 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(See Detroit Open Forum) Institute for American Democracy Institute for American Strategy Institute for Historical Review (1 of 4) Institute for Historical Review (2 of 4) Institute for Historical Review (3 of 4) Institute for Historical Review (4 of 4) Institute for Historical Review - McCalden, David Institute for Humane Studies Institute for Media Analysis Institute for Policy Studies Institute for Rational Living, Inc. (1 of 7) Institute for Rational Living, Inc. (2 of 7) Institute for Rational Living, Inc. (3 of 7) Institute for Rational Living, Inc. (4 of 7) Institute for Rational Living, Inc. (5 of 7) Institute for Rational Living, Inc. (6 of 7) Institute for Rational Living, Inc. (7 of 7) Institute for World Cultural Relations Intercollegiate Society of Individualists, Inc. Intercollegiate Student Council Internal Revenue Service International Educational Forum International Forum on Globalization International Information Bureau International Intelligence Institute International Medical Corps International Monitary Fund International Rescue & Relief Committee Internationalism Internationalism - American Movement for World Government Internationalism - Campaign for World Government, Inc. 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Labor - International Organizations - IWW - Borders Bookshop Labor - International Organizations - IWW - Calendars Labor - International Organizations - IWW - Canada (1 of 2) Labor - International Organizations - IWW - Canada (2 of 2) Labor - International Organizations - IWW - Cascaden, Gordon Labor - International Organizations - IWW - Chaplin, Ralph Labor - International Organizations - IWW - CIO Controversy Labor - International Organizations - IWW - Debs, Eugene B. http://www.lib.umich.edu/spec-coll/labadie/labsvfthmtst2.txt


    9001 -- Militarism - Reserve Officers Training Corps Militarism - School of the Americas Miller, Henry Minnesota Historical Society Minor, Robert Mission Tenant's Union Monetary Reform Monetary Reform - Free Economy Association Monetary Reform - Interchange Society Monetary Reform - KAPACO Monetary Reform - Mohawk Bimetallic Club Monetary Reform - Monetary Action Committee Monetary Reform - Monetary Freedom Network Monetary Reform - Pan-American Bimetallic Association Monetary Reform - Personal Rights Association Monetary Reform - Private Enterprise Money Movement Monetary Reform - Valun Clubs Montenegro Montuifar Y Larrea, Carlos Moore, Ellwood B. Moral Re-Armament Moral Re-Armament - Caux Information Service - Los Angeles Morningstar, Marne Multi-Culturalism Murphy, Frank Music - Rap Mutual Bank Propaenada Narcotics Narcotics - "Do It Now" Foundation Narcotics - Commission for a Drug-Filled America Narcotics - Drug Policy Foundation Narcotics - Leary, Timothy Narcotics - Neo-American Church Narcotics - Psychedelics Narcotics - Student Association for the Study of Hallucinogens Narcotics - Tobacco Narcotics - War on Drugs National Action Group National Association of Scholars National Center for Public Policy Research National Committee for an Effective Congress National Conference of Christians & Jews National Conference on Men & Masculinity National Democratic Policy Committee National Forum Foundation National Land Reform Association National People's Campaign National Popular Government League National Schools Committee for Economic Education National Security Archive National Security Council National Security League Neo-American Church Neo-conservatism Netherlands Networks of Artists for Political Action Nevada University - Getchell Memorial Library New Deal New Democratic Coalition New Democratic Movement New England Free Press New Labor Library New Left New Left - Alaska New Left - Alliance of Revolutionary Workers New Left - Attica Brigade New Left - Michigan New Left - People's Press New Left - Prevailing Winds Research New Left - Progressive Librarians Guild New Left - Radical Decentralists Project New Left - Ramparts New Left - Rising Free Library Collective New Left - Source New Left - Symbionese Liberation Army New Republic (Journal, 1914- ) New World Resettlement Fund New York Intellectuals News Papers Newton, Isaac Nick, George Nixon, Richard Milhouse Non-Nationalists Non-Partisan Libertarian Forum North, Oliver L. Nudism Nudism - Committee for Free Beaches Nudism - Michigan Nudism - Michigan - Naked Mile Nudism - Michigan - Southeast Michigan Naturists Nudism - Naturist Society Occupational Health & Safety Ogg, Robert Y. O'Hara, Frank Ohio Liberal Society Ohliger, John Olasky, Marvin Olerich, Henry Omega Institute for Holistic Studies Operation Atlantis Oral History of the American Left Order of the Iron Hall Order of United Reformers (See: United Reformers, Order of) Organization of Arab Students at the University of Michigan Organization of German Radicals Orgonomy Orozco, Jose Clemente Ossietzky, Karl V. Oxfam America Ozone House (Ann Arbor) Pacem in Terris Pacifism Pacifism - ABSSOP Pacifism - Addams, Jane Pacifism - American Conference for Democracy & Terms of Peace Pacifism - American Friends Service Committee Pacifism - American Liberty Defense League Pacifism - American Neutral Conference Committee (1916) Pacifism - American Pax Association Pacifism - American Peace Test Pacifism - American Society to Defend Children Pacifism - American Union Against Militarism Pacifism - Americans Want to Know Pacifism - Anti-Draft Pacifism - Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Pacifism - Australia Pacifism - Beck, Bruce Pacifism - Berrigan, Daniel Pacifism - Berrigan, Philip Pacifism - Bibliography Pacifism - Boise Peace Quilt Pacifism - Buddhist Peace Fellowship Pacifism - Calendars Pacifism - Camden 28 Pacifism - Campaign Against Arms Trade Pacifism - Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament Pacifism - Campaign for Peace & Democracy/East & West Pacifism - Canada Pacifism - Canada - Ad Hoc Committee to End Militarism in Canada Pacifism - Canada - Alliance for Non-Violent Action (ANVA) Pacifism - Canada - Cruise Missile Conversion Project Pacifism - Canada - Toronto Anti-Intervention Coalition Pacifism - Catholic Peace Fellowship Pacifism - Catonsville Nine Pacifism - Central Committee for Conscientious Objectors Pacifism - Central Committee for Conscientious Objectors - Midwest Committee for Draft Counseling Pacifism - Chemical & Biological Warfare Pacifism - Chicago Area Draft Resistance Pacifism - Civil Defense Letter Committee Pacifism - Civil Defense Protest Committee Pacifism - Clergy & Laity Concerned Pacifism - CNVA (1 of 2) Pacifism - CNVA (2 of 2) Pacifism - CNVA - Camp Ahimsa Pacifism - CNVA - Cuba Pacifism - CNVA - Everyman I Pacifism - CNVA - Minuteman Pacifism - CNVA - Polaris Action Pacifism - CNVA - Walks - Hanover to Washington Pacifism - CNVA - Walks - San Francisco to Moscow Pacifism - Coalition for a New Foreign & Military Policy Pacifism - Coalition to Stop Funding the War Pacifism - Colorado Sate University Research Foundation Pacifism - Committee Against Registration & the Draft Pacifism - Committee for Democratic Control Pacifism - Committee for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) Pacifism - Committee for Nuclear Responsibility Pacifism - Committee for World Development & World Disarmament Pacifism - Committee of the Professions Pacifism - Committee Opposed to Militarism & the Draft Pacifism - Committee to Bridge the Gap Pacifism - Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Pacifism - Conscience & Military Tax Campaign Pacifism - Conscientious Objector Status Pacifism - Conscientious Objectors Pacifism - Conscientious Objectors - O'Connor vs. U.S. Pacifism - Council for a Livable World Pacifism - Culebra Action Pacifism - Dellinger, David Pacifism - Disarmament Pacifism - Doctors Without Borders Pacifism - Drago, May Pacifism - Eastcoast Conspiracy to Save Lives Pacifism - End the Draft Pacifism - Episcopal Peace Fellowship Pacifism - Fellowship of Reconciliation (1 of 2) Pacifism - Fellowship of Reconciliation (2 of 2) Pacifism - Fellowship of World Citizens Pacifism - Finger Lakes Peace Alliance Pacifism - Food Not Bombs Pacifism - France Pacifism - France - Cun de Larzac Pacifism - Freeze Voter Pacifism - Friends Committee on National Legislation Pacifism - Friendship House Pacifism - Fund for Education in World Order Pacifism - Fund for Peace Pacifism - Great Britain - Action Resources Group Pacifism - Great Britain - Greenham Commons Women's Peace Camp Pacifism - Great Peace March Pacifism - Groundwork for a Just World Pacifism - Harrisburg 6 Pacifism - Hiroshima Exhibit Pacifism - Hiroshima/Nagasaki Pacifism - Humanity Guild Pacifism - Institute for the Study of Nonviolence Pacifism - International Confederation for Disarmament Pacifism - International Peace Bureau Pacifism - International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War Pacifism - Internationale der Kriegsdienstgegner Pacifism - Jeannette Rankin Brigade Pacifism - Jewish Peace Fellowship Pacifism - Jobs with Peace Pacifism - Katallagate Pacifism - Landmines Pacifism - Livermore Nuclear Weapons Lab Pacifism - Maloff's Research Library Pacifism - Mayday Pacifism - Metropolitan Board for Conscientious Objectors Pacifism - Michigan Pacifism - Michigan - Ann Arbor Pacifism - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Ann Arbor Women for Peace Pacifism - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Ann Arbor Women's Peace Camp Pacifism - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Interfaith Council for Peace (1 of 2) Pacifism - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Interfaith Council for Peace (2 of 2) Pacifism - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Military Awareness Coalition Pacifism - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Peace Conspiracy Pacifism - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Peace Research & Education Movement Pacifism - Michigan - Ann Arbor - War Tax Counseling Pacifism - Michigan - Coalition for Arms Control Pacifism - Michigan - Covenant for Peace Pacifism - Michigan - Michigan Alliance for Disarmament Pacifism - Michigan - Michigan Labor Committee Against Peace-Time Conscription Pacifism - Michigan - Swords into Plowshares Pacifism - Michigan - Washtenaw Committee Against Registration & the Draft Pacifism - Michigan - Williams International Corporation Pacifism - Michigan - World War II Pacifism - Midwest Committee for Military Counseling Pacifism - Militarism Resource Project Pacifism - Miller, Jerry Pacifism - Minnesota Peace & Justice Coalition Pacifism - Multi-Lateral Nuclear Fleet Pacifism - NARMIC Pacifism - NYC Anti-Nuclear Group Pacifism - National Campaign for Amnesty for War Resisters Pacifism - National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy Pacifism - National Council Against Conscription Pacifism - National Council for Prevention of War - Post Cards Pacifism - National Inter-Religious Service Board for Conscientious Objectors Pacifism - National Peace Academy Pacifism - National Resistance Committee Pacifism - New York Committee for the General Stroke for Peace Pacifism - New York Committee of Women to Defend the Right to Live Pacifism - New York Workshop in Nonviolence Pacifism - No-Conscription League Pacifism - Nonviolent Action Community of Cascadia Pacifism - Non-Violent Revolution Study Kit Pacifism - Non-Violent Training & Research Center Pacifism - Nuclear-Free Pacific Network Pacifism - Nuclear Weapons Freeze Campaign Pacifism - Nukewatch Pacifism - Our Generation Kit Pacifism - Pax Christi Pacifism - Peace Brigades International Pacifism - Peace Council of America Pacifism - Peace Council of Norway Pacifism - Peace House Pacifism - Peace Links Pacifism - The Peace Now Movement Pacifism - Peace Pledge Union Pacifism - Peace Race Committee Pacifism - Peace Tax Fund Pacifism - Peacemakers Pacifism - Physicians for Social Responsibility Pacifism - Post Cards Pacifism - Prayer for Peace Pacifism - Prisoners Strike for Peace Pacifism - Proposition One Committee Pacifism - Quaker Action Group (General) Pacifism - Rankin, Jeannette Pacifism - Relatives & Friends of Conscientious Objectors Pacifism - Richard Chase Committee Pacifism - Rock Against Reagan Pacifism - Sacramento Peace Center Regarding Public Protest Pacifism - SANE Pacifism - Shakertown Pledge Group Pacifism - Stop the Draft Pacifism - Stop the Pentagon/Serve the People Pacifism - Strategic Defense Initiative Pacifism - Student Peace Union Pacifism - Swarthmore College Peace Coalition Pacifism - Turn Towards Peace Pacifism - Union of Concerned Scientists Pacifism - US Committee Against Militarization Pacifism - Veteren Stars & Stripes for Peace Pacifism - Veterans for Peace Pacifism - Vietnam (1 of 4) Pacifism - Vietnam (2 of 4) Pacifism - Vietnam (3 of 4) Pacifism - Vietnam (4 of 4) Pacifism - Vietnam - American Friends of Vietnam Pacifism - Vietnam - Americans Exiled in Canada Pacifism - Vietnam - Another Mother for Peace Pacifism - Vietnam - Art Pacifism - Vietnam - Assembly of Unrepresented People to Declare Peace Pacifism - Vietnam - Bibliography Pacifism - Vietnam - Central Committee of Correspondence Pacifism - Vietnam - Citizens Campaign Against Napalm Pacifism - Vietnam - Clergy & Laymen Concerned About Vietnam (1 of 2) Pacifism - Vietnam - Clergy & Laymen Concerned About Vietnam (2 of 2) Pacifism - Vietnam - Cleveland Draft Resistance Union Pacifism - Vietnam - Committee of Responsibility Pacifism - Vietnam - Conscientious Objection Pacifism - Vietnam - DCEWV Pacifism - Vietnam - Fellowship of Reconciliation Pacifism - Vietnam - Fifth Avenue Peace Parade Committee Pacifism - Vietnam - Fort Hood Three Defense Committee Pacifism - Vietnam - Howe, H.H. Pacifism - Vietnam - Individuals Against the Crime of Silence Pacifism - Vietnam - Interfaith Committee on Religion & Peace Pacifism - Vietnam - Lawyer's Committee on American Policy Towards Vietnam Pacifism - Vietnam - March Against Death, November 13-15, 1969 Pacifism - Vietnam - March on Washington for Peace in Vietnam Pacifism - Vietnam - Medical Aid for Indochina Pacifism - Vietnam - Michigan Pacifism - Vietnam - Michigan - Ann Arbor Pacifism - Vietnam - Michigan - Ann Arbor (U of M, 1965) Pacifism - Vietnam - Michigan - Ann Arbor (U of M, 1975) Pacifism - Vietnam - Michigan - Resistance Pacifism - Vietnam - Milwaukee Defense Fund Pacifism - Vietnam - National Coordinating Committee to End the War in Vietnam (1 of 2) Pacifism - Vietnam - National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam (2 of 2) Pacifism - Vietnam - National Student & Youth Conference for the People's Peace Pacifism - Vietnam - New Politics for Peace in Vietnam Pacifism - Vietnam - People's Coalition for Peace & Justice Pacifism - Vietnam - People's Peace Treaty Pacifism - Vietnam - Quakers Pacifism - Vietnam - Resist Pacifism - Vietnam - South Viet National Front for Liberation Pacifism - Vietnam - Spring Mobilization Committee Pacifism - Vietnam - Stockholm Conference on Vietnam Pacifism - Vietnam - Student Mobilization Committee Pacifism - Vietnam - Tax Refusal Pacifism - Vietnam - The Irv Kurki Defense Committee Pacifism - Vietnam - U.S. Committee to Aid the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam Pacifism - Vietnam - Veterans & Reservists to End the War in Vietnam Pacifism - Vietnam - Vietnam Day Committee Pacifism - Vietnam - Vietnam Solidarity Campaign Pacifism - Vietnam - Vietnam Summer Pacifism - Vietnam - Vietnam Veterans Against the War Pacifism - Vietnam - World Without War Council Pacifism - Vietnam - World Youth Crusade for Freedom Pacifism - War Resisters International Pacifism - War Resisters League (1 of 2) Pacifism - War Resisters League (2 of 2) Pacifism - War Resisters League - Movement Security Kit Pacifism - War Resisters League - Non-Violent Revolution Study Kit Pacifism - Weik, Mary Hayes Pacifism - White House Daily Meeting Pacifism - WIN Pacifism - Women in Black Pacifism - Women's Action for Nuclear Disarmament Pacifism - Women's Committee to Oppose Conscription Pacifism - Women's Encampment for a Future of Peace & Justice Pacifism - Women's International Democratic Federation Pacifism - Women's International League for Peace & Freedom Pacifism - Women's Strike for Peace Pacifism - World Federalists Pacifism - World Peace Brigade for Non-Violent Action Pacifism - World Peace Study Mission Pacifism - World Peace Tax Fund Pacifism - World Peaceways Pacifism - World War II Pacifism - Yankee Refugee Pacifism - Youth Committee Against Peacetime Conscription Pacifism - Youth Committee Against War Packard, James Paglia, Camille Panama Parker, Prescott A. Parodies Pasolini, Pier Paolo Pathfinders of America Peace & Freedom Party Peace Corps Pearson, James Larkin Pedestrians PEN People for the American Way People's Bicentennial Commission People's Party (see: Populous Party) Persian Gulf War Persian Gulf War - Coalition of Community & University Groups for a Just Peace in the Gulf Persian Gulf War - Student Coalition Against U.S. Intervention in the Middle East Persian Gulf War - Teach-Ins Peru Phonograph Records Phonograph Records - Index Phonograph Records - Paredon Records Phonograph Records - Rounder Records Photographs Photography - Orphanos, Stathis Piercy, Marge Pilk, Inez Pioneer Youth Pioneers of the Revolution PIRG - Michigan Plaster Casters Plumb Plan League Poems & Songs (1 of 5) Poems & Songs (2 of 5) Poems & Songs (3 of 5) Poems & Songs (4 of 5) Poems & Songs (5 of 5) Poems & Songs - New Song Library Poetry - Bad Poetry - Working Class Police - Americans for Effective Law Enforcement Police - National Police Academy Police - National Police Officers Association of America Police - United Police Fund Polis Political Correctness Political Correctness - Bureau of Political Correctness Political Parties - Detroit Political Parties - New York - Amalgamation Party Political Parties - Theocratic Party Political Research Association Politics & Elections Popular Culture Popular Culture - Bowling Green State University Popular Culture - Michigan State University Popular Culture - Ohio Stare University Popular Reality Populism Populist Party Portugal Posada Aguilar, Jose Guadelupe Post War World Council Postcards - Curt Teich Postcard Archives Postmodernism Potomac Institute Powell, Colin Preservation Prisons & Prisoners Prisons & Prisoners - African National Prison Organization Prisons & Prisoners - Aid to Incarcerated Mothers Prisons & Prisoners - Associated Library & Educational Research Team for Survival Prisons & Prisoners - Atmore - Holmes Brothers Prisons & Prisoners - Attica Prisons & Prisoners - Bar None Prisons & Prisoners - California Prisons & Prisoners - Committee to Abolish Prison Slavery Prisons & Prisoners - Elizabeth Fry Center Prisons & Prisoners - Families Against Mandatory Minimums Prisons & Prisoners - Florida Prisons & Prisoners - Fortune Society Prisons & Prisoners - Free George Ince Prisons & Prisoners - Garment Factory 14 Prisons & Prisoners - Gaycon Prisons & Prisoners - Germany Prisons & Prisoners - Graham/Allen Defense Committee Prisons & Prisoners - Illinois - Marion Prisons & Prisoners - International Conference on Prison Abolition Prisons & Prisoners - King, Darryl P. Prisons & Prisoners - Leavenworth Brothers Prisons & Prisoners - Marion Brothers Prisons & Prisoners - McGivern, Gary Prisons & Prisoners - Michigan Prisons & Prisoners - Naftel, Avi Prisons & Prisoners - National Institute for Sentencing Alternatives Prisons & Prisoners - National Prisoners Relief Club Prisons & Prisoners - People Organized to Stop Rape of Imprisoned Persons Prisons & Prisoners - Poetry Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - American Freedom Convention, 1919 Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty - London Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty (General) Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty Committee of Chicago Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty Committee of the Central Federated Union of Greater New York & the Vicinity Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty International Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty International - Michigan - Ann Arbor Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty International of the USA (AIUSA) (1 of 4) Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty International of the USA (AIUSA) (2 of 4) Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty International of the USA (AIUSA) (3 of 4) Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty International of the USA (AIUSA) (4 of 4) Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty International Reports Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Amnesty League Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Committee for Artistic & Intellectual Freedom in Iran (CAIFI) Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - d'Aquino, Iva Toguri Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Entr'aide et Action Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Hector Marroquin Defense Committee Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - International League for the Rights & Liberation of Peoples Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Joint Amnesty Committee Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - League for the Amnesty of Political Prisoners Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Magee, Ruchell Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - National Committee to Free Puerto Rican POW & Political Prisoners Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - National Council for Universal & Unconditional Amnesty Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Peace Pledge Union Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - People for Amnesty Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Peoples' Freedom Union Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Political Amnesty League Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Resource Center for Philippine Concerns (RCPC) Prisons & Prisoners - Political Prisoners - Safe Return Amnesty Committee Prisons & Prisoners - Pontiac Prisoners Prisons & Prisoners - Prison Fellowship Prisons & Prisoners - Prison Activist Resource Center Prisons & Prisoners - Prisoner Solidarity Committee Prisons & Prisoners - Prisoners Literature Project Prisons & Prisoners - Prisoners Union Prisons & Prisoners - Radical Alternatives to Prisons Prisons & Prisoners - Raze the Walls! Prisons & Prisoners - Rock Aganist Prisons Prisons & Prisoners - Sanchez, Eddie Prisons & Prisoners - Sexual Life Prisons & Prisoners - Stroud, Robert F. Prisons & Prisoners - Virginia Prisons & Prisoners - Wallace, Sharron Prisons & Prisoners - Women Prisons & Prisoners - World Prison Poetry Center Pro-American Order of Invincibility (ORVIG) Professionalization - Radical Caucuses - Conference for a Relevant Social Science Professionalization - Radical Caucuses - Union for Radical Political Economies Progressive Democracy Propaganda Committee Progressive League Progressive Party - Songs Progressive Party, 1948-1954 Progressive Voters' League Prohibition Project Outreach Proletarian Art Proletarian Forum Proletarian Group Proletarian Literature - Bibliography Proletarian Literature - Hall, Tim Prometheus Books Propagandist League Provisional Congress Against Capitalist Wars Psychiatry - International Association on the Political Use of Psychiatry Public Ownership League of America Puritanism - Vignette Quakers Quayle, Daniel Quebec Nationalism Racism Racism - Anti-Racism Racism - Anti-Racism - Anti-Racist Action (ARA) Racism - Anti-Racism - Rock Aganist Racism Radical Independent Party Radical Research Center Radical Right - Canada - The Canadian Guard Radical Right - Canada - Ku Klux Klan Radical Right - Canada - The National Unity Party of Canada Radical Right - Canada - White Canada Crusade Radical Right - France Radical Right - Germany - Neo-Nazis http://www.lib.umich.edu/spec-coll/labadie/labsvfthmtst2.txt


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Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - American Jewish Committee on Soviet Jewry Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Anti-Defamation League Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Canada Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Committee on Soviet Jews Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Feminists Against Anti-Semitism Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Holocaust Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Holocaust - Holocaust Memorial Museum Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Holocaust - Joseph T. Adler Archive Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Holocaust - Revisionist History Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Holocaust - Wallenberg, Raoul Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Jewish Defense League Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Leese, Arnold Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Russia - Ann Arbor Action for Soviet Jewry Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Russia - Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry (1 of 2) Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Russia - Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry (2 of 2) Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Russia - Union Councils for Soviet Jews Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Russia (Miscellaneous) Religion - Jews - Anti-Semitism - Simon Wiesenthal Center Religion - Jews - Bibliography Religion - Jews - Gesher Religion - Jews - Jewish Liberation Project Religion - Jews - Jews for Jesus Religion - Jews - Jews for Racial & Economic Justice Religion - Jews - Latin America Religion - Jews - Michigan - Ann Arbor (1 of 2) Religion - Jews - Michigan - Ann Arbor (2 of 2) Religion - Jews - Michigan - Ann Arbor - B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Religion - Jews - National Jewish Resource Center Religion - Jews - New Jewish Agenda Religion - Jews - North American Conference on Ethopian Jewry Religion - Jews - S.H.M.A.T.E. Religion - Jews - Tagar Religion - Jews - Tikkun Religion - Jews - YIVO Institute for Jewish Research Religion - Jews - Zionism Religion - Liberation Theology Religion - Michigan Religion - Mormons Religion - National Council of Churches Religion - Pastors for Peace Religion - Power Papers Religion - Presbyterians for Democracy & Religious Freedom Religion - Satanism Religion - Shakers Religion - The Witness Rent Control Republican National Committee Republican Party Republican Party - Human Events Republican Party - Union Republican, 1872 Republican Party - Young Republicans Resources for Independent Thinking Reuben, William A. Reuber, Karl Revolutions - 1848 Rivera, Diego Robin's Distributing Co. Robins, Raymond Robinson, Edwin Arlington Rogers, Thorold Roosevelt, Eleanor Rorem, Ned Rosten, Norman (See Drama - Rosten, Norman) Royal Arcanum Rushdie, Salman Russian-American National League Russian Social Democratic Society of Detroit Rutherford Institute Ryskind, Morrie Saginaw Valley Collectivist Community Salemme, Antonio (1892-1995) Salt, Henry S. Salter, John R., Jr. Salter, William M. San Juan, Epifanio, Jr. Satin, Mark Satire Saudi Arabia Savings & Loan Societies Scanlan's Monthly Schappes Defense Committee Scholarly Resources (1 of 2) Scholarly Resources (2 of 2) Schurz, Carl Science - Marxist Interpretation Science - Radical - Bibliographies Scott, Winfield Lionel Screen Office & Professional Employees Guild Second Thoughts Project Seldes, George Self Management Group of Western Australia Sellars, Peter Sensitivity Training Serbia Servants of Awareness Sex Education Sexual Abuse Sexual Freedom Sexual Freedom - All Together Sexual Freedom - Amslow, John & Assoc. Sexual Freedom - Artisex Sexual Freedom - Bibliography Sexual Freedom - Bisexuality Sexual Freedom - Campus Sexual Freedom Forum (CSFF) Sexual Freedom - Child Custody (1 of 2) Sexual Freedom - Child Custody (2 of 2) Sexual Freedom - Childhood Sensuality Circle Sexual Freedom - Children of God Sexual Freedom - Church of Aphrodite Sexual Freedom - Circumcision Sexual Freedom - Circumcision - End the Horror of Infant Circumcision Sexual Freedom - Circumcision - National Organization of Circumcision & Information Resource Centers (NOCIRC) Sexual Freedom - Circumcision - National Organization of Restoring Men Sexual Freedom - Circumcision - National Organization to Halt the Abuse & Routine Mutilation of Males (NOHARMM) Sexual Freedom - Circumcision - Newborn Rights Society Sexual Freedom - Committee Against Blasphemy Law Sexual Freedom - Committee to Preserve Our Sexual & Civil Liberties Sexual Freedom - Conference on Sexual Liberty & Social Repression Sexual Freedom - Conference on the Cultural Construction of Sexuality, Oct. 5-6, 1991 Sexual Freedom - Directories Sexual Freedom - Dorian Book Service Sexual Freedom - Erickson Educational Foundation Sexual Freedom - Eunuchs Sexual Freedom - Films Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation (1 of 3) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation (2 of 3) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation (3 of 3) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - ACT UP Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Advice Columns Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Advocate Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Advocate Supplement Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Afghanistan Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Africa Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Aging Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Alabama Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Albania Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Albany Trust Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Alfred, Randy Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Algeria Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Almodóvar, Pedro Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - American Association of Religious Crusaders Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - American Historical Association - Committee on Lesbian & Gay History Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - American Library Association - Social Responsibilities Roundtable, Task Force on Gay Liberation Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Americans Against Discrimination Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - April Actions for Peace, Jobs & Justice Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Arabs Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - Baker Memorial Library Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - Canadian Gay Archives Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - Centro di Doucumentazione Il Cassero Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - Gay & Lesbian Archive Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - Gay & Lesbian Archive of the Pacific Northwest Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - Gerber-Hart Library Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - Homodok Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - International Association of Lesbian & Gay Archives & Libraries Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - International Gay & Lesbian Archives Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - International Gay History Archive Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - James C. Hormel Lesbian & Gay Center Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - Lesbian Herstory Archives Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - National Gay Archives Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - One/International Gay & Lesbian Archives Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Archives - San Francisco Public Library - Gay & Lesbian Center Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Argentina Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Arizona Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Arkansas Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Armed Forces Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Armed Forces - May, Steve Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Armed Forces - McVeigh, Timothy R. Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Armed Forces - Servicemembers Legal Defense Network Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Armenia Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Art Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Arvin, Newton Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Asians & Asian Americans Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Asians & Asian Americans - Gay Asian Pacific Alliance Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Association of Gay Psychologists Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Astraea National Lesbian Foundation Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Australia (1 of 3) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Australia (2 of 3) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Australia (3 of 3) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Bahamas Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Bangladesh Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Bannon, Ann Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Bears Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Belize Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Bibliographies (1 of 4) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Bibliographies (2 of 4) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Bibliographies (3 of 4) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Bibliographies (4 of 4) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Black & White Men Together Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Black & White Men Together - Chicago Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Black & White Men Together - Cleveland Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Black & White Men Together - Conventions (1983, etc.) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Black & White Men Together - Detroit Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Black & White Men Together - Philadelphia Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Black & White Men Together - San Francisco Bay Area Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Black Lesbian & Gay Conference Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blackheart Collective Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacklight Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks (1 of 3) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks (2 of 3) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks (3 of 3) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Adodi Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - African-American Gay & Lesbian Studies Center Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - African-American Lesbian & Gay Alliance Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Bayard Rustin Alliance Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Beam, Joseph Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Bey, Andy Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Black Gay & Lesbian Leadership Forum Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Boykin, Keith Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Delaney, Samuel R. Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Dixon, Melvin Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Duplechon, Larry Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Ellis, Ruth Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Fleming, Mickey Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Gay Men of African Descent Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Hampton, Mabel Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Hardy, James Earl Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Harris, E. Lynn Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Hemphill, Essex Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Julien, Isiac Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - National Black Gay & Lesbian Conference Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - National Black Lesbian & Gay Leadership Forum Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - National Coalition of Black Gays Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - National Coalition of Black Lesbians & Gays Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Paul, Duane Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Pomo Afro Homos Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Pouncy, Charles Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Rafiki Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Riggs, Marlon Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Rodman, Dennis Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Saint, Assotto Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Tibbs, Thurlow Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Blacks - Vogueing Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Book Guild of America Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Boy Scout Controversy Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Boy with Arms Akibo Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Brazil Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Brazil - Bahia Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Brown, Forman Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Browning, Frank Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Bryant, Anita Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - C.O.Q. Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Califia, Pat Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - California Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - California - Bay Area Network of Gay & Lesbian Educators Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - California - Gay & Lesbian Educators of Southern California Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - California - Kight, Morris Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - California - San Francisco Bay Area Gay & Lesbian Historical Society Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Callow, Simon Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Cambodia Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Campaign for Homosexual Equality Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Canada (1 of 2) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Canada (2 of 2) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Canada - Robinson, Svend Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Canada - Toronto Center for Lesbian & Gay Studies Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Cards Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Caribbean & the Guyanas Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Carstairs, Joe Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Catholic Church Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Cayman Islands Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Chicago Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Chicago Resource Center Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Chile Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - China Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Circle of Friends Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Circuit Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Citizens for Gay Rights Legislation Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Cleaver, Richard Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Clifford, Ralph Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Colombia Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Colorado Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Committee for Homosexual Freedom - Newsletter Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Committee of Concern for Homosexuals Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Common Lives Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Concerned Americans for Individual Rights Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Concerned Ladies of America Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Conferences Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Connecticut Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Conservatives Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Corigliano, John Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Costa Rica Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Councils on Religion & the Homosexual Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Cracker Barrel Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Crew, Louie Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Crisp, Quentin Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Cuba Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Cuba - Improper Conduct (Film) Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Cyprus Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Czechoslovakia Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Daughters of Bilitis Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Dawn Media Publications - Update, San Diego, California Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - DeGeneres, Ellen Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Delaware Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Denmark Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Dignity Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Directories Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - District of Columbia Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Douglas, Norman Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Drag Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - DSI Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Dykes Against Racism Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Ebensten, Hanns Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Ecuador Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Egypt Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Elections Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Elysian Fields Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Endean, Steve http://www.lib.umich.edu/spec-coll/labadie/labsvfthmtst2.txt


    9001 -- Tchaikovsky, Piotr Ilych Technocracy Technology Technology - Anti-Technology Technology - Anti-Technology - Unabomber Television Television - Kill Your Television Television - National Empowerment Television Television - Public Broadcasting Service Television - Society for the Eradication of Television Terrorism Terrorism - Handbooks Terzani Defense Committee Thatcher, Margaret Theatre Theatre - Dramatic Arts Center Theatre - Federal Theatre Project Theatre - Performance Network Theatre - Yiddish Theatre Theatre, Black Theatre, Gay Theatre, Hispanic Theatre, Radical Theatre, Radical - Back Alley Players Theatre, Radical - Bread & Puppet Theater Theatre, Radical - Hair Theatre, Radical - Provisional Theatre Theatre, Radical - Vasser Experimental Theatre Thompson, Virgil Tibet Tolstoy Foundation Torture Totalitarianism Townsend Plan Trade Union Educational League Trade Union Unity Convention Trade Union Unity League Trevellick, Richard F. Trevellick, Richard F. - Bibliography Trinidad & Tobago Truman, Harry S. Trusts Truth Missions Tubbs, Bill (W.P.) (see: Fellowship of Freedom) Turkey Twain, Mark U.S. Civil Intelligence Agency U.S. Congress Against War U.S. President - Memorial . . . Regarding . . . The Abolition of the Presidency Underground Press (1 of 2) Underground Press (2 of 2) Underground Press - Agenda Underground Press - Alternative Media Information Center Underground Press - Alternative Press Center Underground Press - Alternative Press Index Underground Press - Amerikan Press Syndicate Underground Press - Ann Arbor Argus Underground Press - Archives - University of Montana Small Press Archives Underground Press - Catalogs Underground Press - Censorship Underground Press - Connecticut University Underground Press - DataCenter (Oakland, California) Underground Press - Ecomedia Underground Press - Europe Underground Press - Everything But The Kitchen Sink Underground Press - Independent Press Association Underground Press - Labadie Collection Underground Press - Last Gasp Underground Press - Liberation News Service Underground Press - Living Color Underground Press - Michigan Underground Press - Michigan - Neither/Nor Press Underground Press - Microfilm - Bell & Howell Publishers Underground Press - Network Underground Press - Oakland University Library Underground Press - Quimby's Queer Store Underground Press - Rip Off Press Underground Press - Temple University - Contemporary Culture Center Underground Press - The Communication Company Underground Press - Underground Press Collections (University Microfilms International) Underground Press - Underground Press Conference Underground Press - Zines Unemployed - Citizens' Protective Union Unemployed - Unemployed & Project Workers Union Unemployed - Unemployed Councils of U.S. (Hunger March, 1931) Unemployed - Unemployed League of Detroit Unemployed - Unemployed Leagues - Hoih Unemployed League - Songs Union for Democratic Action United Front Committee - Detroit United Front Committee Against War & Fascism United Nations United States Book Exchange United Student Peace Committee United We Stand America Upland Institute Urban Planning Utopias Van Kleeck, Mary Van Vechten, Carl Vegetarianism Vegetarianism - American Vegan Society Veterans Viereck, Peter Vietnam Vietnam - Boat People Vietnam - National United Front For the Liberation of Vietnam Vietnam - Vietnam Friendship-Aid Association Vietnam War (2 of 2) Vietnam War (1 of 2) Vietnam War - Amnesty Vietnam War - Blacks Vietnam War - Heroin Vietnam War - Our Generation Kit Vietnam War - Prisoners Vietnam War - Propaganda (1 of 2) Vietnam War - Propaganda (2 of 2) Vietnam War - Sky Hook II Project Vietnam War - Veterans Vila, Roland VISTA Vocations for Social Change Vonnegut, Kurt Vorse, Mary Heaton Voting Voting - Anti-Voting Voting - Project Vote Smart Wagner, A.G. (see: Fellowship of Freedom) Wales War on Want Warhol, Andy Warthan, Red Warwick University (England) - Centre for the Study of Social History Washington, Harold Watson, Tom Waudby, William S. Weber, Edward C. (1 of 2) Weber, Edward C. (2 of 2) Weinberger, Harry Welfare Wells, Charles A. Western Review Institute Western World Press White, Minor Whiteman, Lulu Wilcox, Laird Wild Irons Eight Hour Pioneer Association Willard, Frances Williams, Tennessee Windmiller, Marshall Winter, William Wisconsin State Historical Society Wisconsin University Labor Library Witkop, Amalia, Fannie, Pauly, & Rose Wittke, Carl - Works, General (see also: Heinzen-Pams & Books) Wolfe, Burton H. 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Women - Organizations - National Council for Research on Women Women - Organizations - National Organization of Women - Project on Equal Education Rights Women - Organizations - National Women's Party Women - Organizations - National Women's Political Caucus Women - Organizations - NOW Women - Organizations - NOW - Michigan Women - Organizations - Organization for Equal Education of the Sexes Women - Organizations - Radical Women (1 of 2) Women - Organizations - Radical Women (2 of 2) Women - Organizations - Revolutionary Club of Women Women - Organizations - Second Wave Women - Organizations - Southern California Women for Understanding Women - Organizations - Unitarian Universalist Women's Federation Women - Organizations - Woman's National Progressive League Women - Organizations - Woman's Peace Party Women - Organizations - Womanspace (Ann Arbor) Women - Organizations - Women for Racial & Economic Equality Women - Organizations - Women's Action Coalition (WAC) Women - Organizations - Women's Committee for World Disarmament Women - Poetry Women - Publications - New Women's Times Women - Puerto Rico Women - Rape Women - Rape - Bobbitt Case Women - Resources - Resources for Feminist Research Women - Resources - Women's Yellow Pages Women - Serbia Women - Suffrage Women - Suffrage - Freeman, Elisabeth Women - Take Back the Night Women - Woman to Woman Women - Women of Color Research Center Women - Women's Presses Library Project (1 of 2) Women - Women's Presses Library Project (2 of 2) Wood, J.H. Woodbrookers in America Woodcock, Raymond L. Woods, Shakey Jake Workers Against Concessions Party World Future Society World War I World War I & II - Veterans - American Veterans Committee World War II World War II - Katyn Forest Massacre World War II - World War II Museum, Royal Oak Michigan World Youth Crusade for Freedom The Young Democracy Young Patriots Youth & Student Protest Youth & Student Protest - Alcohol Youth & Student Protest - American Documentary Films Youth & Student Protest - American Student Union Youth & Student Protest - American Youth Congress Youth & Student Protest - Americans for Democratic Action Youth & Student Protest - Association for Commitment to World Responsibility Youth & Student Protest - Bay Area Radical Education Project Youth & Student Protest - Bay Area Student Committee . . . - Catalogs Youth & Student Protest - Bay Area Student Committee. . . Youth & Student Protest - Blacks Youth & Student Protest - California - Berkeley - People's Park Youth & Student Protest - California - San Francisco State College Youth & Student Protest - California - University of California (1 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - California - University of California (2 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - California - University of California - Berkeley - Free Speech Movement Youth & Student Protest - California - University of California - Berkeley - Third World Liberation Front Youth & Student Protest - Chicago 8 (1 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - Chicago 8 (2 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - Columbia University Youth & Student Protest - Cornell University Youth & Student Protest - Democratic National Convention, 1992 Youth & Student Protest - Democratic National Convention, 1996 Youth & Student Protest - Dow Chemical Demonstrations Youth & Student Protest - France Youth & Student Protest - Free Universities Youth & Student Protest - Germany - Berlin Youth & Student Protest - Harvard University Youth & Student Protest - High School Underground Youth & Student Protest - High Schools Youth & Student Protest - High Schools - Ann Arbor Youth & Student Protest - High Schools - Resist High School Kit Youth & Student Protest - High Schools - Richardson, Ronald A. 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Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Michigan Review Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Michigan Student Assembly Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Michigan Student Assembly - Peace & Justice Committee Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - PASE Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Student Communications Network Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Students Organizing for Labor & Economic Equality (SOLE) Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - United Coalition Against Racism Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Michigan Youth Congress Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Wayne State University Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - White Panthers Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - White Panthers - Plamondon, Genie Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - White Panthers - Plamondon, Pun (Lawrence) Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - White Panthers - Sinclair, John (Clippings) Youth & Student Protest - Miscellaneous Youth & Student Protest - National Student Association Youth & Student Protest - National Student League Youth & Student Protest - New University Conference Youth & Student Protest - Newark Community Union Project Youth & Student Protest - Northern Student Movement (1 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - Northern Student Movement (2 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - NSM - Harlem Education Project Youth & Student Protest - Ohio - Kent State University (1 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - Ohio - Kent State University (2 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - Our Generation Kit - A Youth & Student Protest - Our Generation Kit - B Youth & Student Protest - Our Generation Kit - C Youth & Student Protest - Our Generation Kit - D Youth & Student Protest - Progressive Student Network Youth & Student Protest - Radical Education Project (1 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - Radical Education Project (2 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - Revolutionary Student Brigade Youth & Student Protest - Rising Up Angry Youth & Student Protest - Rock Aganist the Right Youth & Student Protest - SDS Youth & Student Protest - SDS Youth & Student Protest - SDS Youth & Student Protest - SDS Youth & Student Protest - SDS - "Mother Baines Snake Oil Elixer" - Poster Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Bibliography Youth & Student Protest - SDS - CAW Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Constitution & Organization, Chapters & Finances Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Conventions, 1962- Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Conventions, 1962- Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Council & Conferences Youth & Student Protest - SDS - ERAP Youth & Student Protest - SDS - History Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Labor Committees Youth & Student Protest - SDS - March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Constitutions, Platform, Meeting Minutes (1 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Constitutions, Platform, Meeting Minutes (2 of 2) Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Program & Demonstration Fliers, 1962 -1965 Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Program & Demonstration Fliers, 1966- Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - SGC Campaign & Election Materials Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Voice Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Ohio Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Peace Research Education Project Youth & Student Protest - SDS - PEP Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Progressive Labor Party Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Protests & Demonstrations Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Radical Education Project (REP) Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Reunion, 1987 Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam (1 of 5) Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam (2 of 5) Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam (3 of 5) Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam (4 of 5) Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam (5 of 5) Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Work List Mailing, 1964- Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Worklists (Names & Addresses) Youth & Student Protest - SLATE Youth & Student Protest - Stoney Brook, University of New York at Youth & Student Protest - Student Press Law Center Youth & Student Protest - Student Research Facility Youth & Student Protest - Students for Social Equality Youth & Student Protest - U.S. National Student Association Youth & Student Protest - University Christian Movement Youth & Student Protest - Wayne Greene Defense Committee Youth & Student Protest - Wisconsin - Madison - Fine, David Youth & Student Protest - Yippies Youth & Student Protest - Yippies - Hoffman, Abbie Youth & Student Protest - Youth Against War & Fascism Youth & Student Protest - Youth Liberation Yugoslavia Zaire Zane, David Zinn, Howard Zubal, John T.

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    9001 -- Martha Ackelsberg http://melior.univ-montp3.fr/ra_forum/en/people/ http://melior.univ-montp3.fr/ra_forum/en/people/ackelsberg_martha/index.html



    9001 -- Augustus John

    When the Glasgow anarchist orator Eddie Shaw asked him what work he did, John replied, 'I don't need to work. People pay me for painting.' --- Donald Rooum I was reading recently the biography by Michael Holroyd of the painter Augustus John, a self-declared anarchist who was also rather a monster in creating around himself the particular version of anarchy that appealed to him. Holroyd is describing John's return, in his 73rd year in 1950 to St-Rémy in France, to a place he had left in a hurry in 1939: 'French feeding wasn't what it had been & the wine seemed to have gone off. But in the evening, at the Cafe' des Varie'te's, he could still obtain that peculiar equilibrium of spirit & body he described as 'detachment-in-intimacy'. The conversation whirled around him, the accordion played, & sometimes he was rewarded 'by the apparition of a face or part of a face, a gesture or conjunction of forms which I recognise as belonging to a more real & harmonious world than that to which we are accustomed'." --- Colin Ward
    Augustus John


    9001 -- ADD BLOOD UPDATES

    LYND WARD, GELLART, ET AL

    http://www.graphicwitness.org/ineye/index2.htm

    http://www.graphicwitness.org/historic/ward16.htm
    http://www.bpib.com/lyndward.htm
    http://gulib.lausun.georgetown.edu/associates/newsletter/53/ward.htm
    http://www.antioch.com/lobby_lynd.html
    http://www.antioch.com/lobby_wardx56.jpg

    --



    9001 --

    Alan Wald on "The Radical Novel Reconsidered"--interviewed by Chris Faatz for Reading the Left no. 4 (Fall 1998)

  • Date: Fri, 30 Oct 1998 10:05:37 -0800
    To: READING THE LEFT@stayhungry.rs.itd.umich.edu From: Chris Faatz 
    Subject: READING THE LEFT #4: Special edition 

    In this special issue of READING THE LEFT, I'm pleased to bring you an interview with radical scholar, historian, & literary critic Alan Wald.

    Alan, a professor at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, is the author or co-author of several books & even more (often controversial!) essays on all matter of subjects, but primarily the history of the US left & the history of radical literature. In this essay, we briefly consider a new project he's undertaken, the overall editorial control of the University of Illinois Press' "Radical Novel Reconsidered" series.

    This interview may be re-run in any publication interested, however I ask two things: 1) contact me first, 2) no editing of content without prior agreement on my & Alan's part.

    Thanks, & enjoy.

    Chris

    THE RADICAL NOVEL RECONSIDERED

    1) What led you to this project? What is its *political* significance? How'd the University of Illinois Press get into it?

    The proposal for the series was initiated by University of Illinois Press Director Richard Wentworth, who has an excellent record of publishing, & sometimes reprinting paperback editions of, important books on Left history & culture. For some time I had been reviewing proposals for manuscripts of books for the University of Illinois, including several for the series of Left poets ("The American Poetry Recovery Series") that Cary Nelson inaugurated with the COLLECTED POEMS OF EDWIN ROLFE (Rolfe was a veteran of the Lincoln Brigade). I had also been recommending paperback reprints of books on Left culture for Columbia University Press--classic works by Daniel Aaron, James Gilbert, Frank Warren, Walter Rideout, Henry May, James T. Farrell, Sidney Hook, & so on.

    My own scholarly research, writing & teaching for the past decade has focused on reconstructing Left (mostly Communist) cultural practice during the 1940s & 1950s. Naturally this work is bonded back to the experiences of the 1930s & looks forward to (and frequently intersects with) the new politico-cultural radicalism of the 1960s. So it's logical that I would favor the republishing of novels (as well as poetry, short stories, criticism, etc.) from this mid-century era.

    The political significance of the project is multiple. First, it will enable young activists of today to see that the Left cultural tradition is far broader, more complex & relevant than the earlier studies--and relatively few available texts--would indicate. There were hundreds of significant Left writers in mid-century--not just the canonical Gold, Dos Passos, Wright, Steinbeck, Le Sueur, & so on--and they wrote in many different genres about diverse regions of the US.

    They tackled all sorts of complex issues in regard to racism, the family, personal life, party commitment, & used every form imaginable--including science fiction, detective fiction, pulp fiction, as well as historical & experimental novels, etc. There is a great deal to be learned from what our predecessors addressed in their work; the Left can become strengthened by understanding its own legacy in all its richness. Needless to say, the same point can be made in regard to the visual arts, poetry, theater, criticism & journalism.

    2) What's the political background of the folks who's books are being republished? Are they all CPers? Is there a general time span for them (the thirties, etc.)?

    The focus of the series is mid-century--mainly the 1920s through the 1950s. However, I'm trying to give a special emphasis to the 1940s & 1950s because these decades have been so neglected in terms of scholarship about left-wing novelists. Moreover, quite a few of the authors from the 1940s-50s are still alive & I want to see them get some recognition while they can still appreciate it--I'm talking here about Philip Bonosky, Alfred Maund, Alexander Saxton, Abraham Polonsky, John Sanford & Ira Wolfert (who died just as TUCKER'S PEOPLE was being reissued).

    Of course, it's no secret that the center of the LEFT in mid-century was the CP, & probably half of the writers we have published so far held membership for a while (Page, Sanford, Saxton, Polonsky, Bonosky) while most others were pretty close (Lumpkin, Herbst). Yzieska considered herself a socialist & Maund took a non-sectarian attitude toward all groups--he had friends in the CP & SWP, & wrote for MONTHLY REVIEW as well as AMERICAN SOCIALIST (edited by Cochran).

    3) As you point out, a large percentage of them are women. What role did women play in the left cultural scene at the period described?

    Well, there are different theories about Left-wing women writers. The late Constance Coiner, in BETTER RED, argued that there was an "official" & "unofficial" culture produced by Left women writers, the former being in the framework of the masculinist/productivist orientation that she ascribes to the CP. Barbara Foley, Paula Rabinowitz, Nora Ruth Roberts, Laura Hapke & others propose alternative interpretations in their books of criticism. Personally, I find Coiner's approach too schematic; one has to be careful about generalizing about diverse women on the one hand, & "the Party" on the other. In my view, there still remains a massive amount of research & biographical reconstruction to be undertaken about many Left women writers. Only after that has occurred, & a range of opinions are aired, can we move to the level of generalization with any certainty. I hope that the Illinois series will aid that process in terms of getting texts into circulation as well as through some of the new material in the Introductions to the novels, such as Suzanne Sowinska's fine biographical study of Lumpkin.

    4) In your view, what's the role of literature in the struggle for revolutionary socialism in the United States & internationally?

    Well, I don't think it's useful to talk of one particular "role," since literature performs so many social functions. The important thing is to take a broad & non-sectarian view of the full range of left-wing experiences & "positions," something we can afford to do now that so much of the former Communist, Maoist & Trotskyist movements have opened up & are engaging in regroupment processes. Clearly Trotsky had a point when he argued in LITERATURE & REVOLUTION that literature always lags behind social reality & is a poor guide to the future. On the other hand, the is a legitimate tradition of Marxists who see literature as prophetic in its peneration to fundamental issues in life, and, of course, literature is often the repository of utopian hopes for a future egalitarian society. As I emphasized in answering the first question, Left literature can also record the powerful as well as painful experiences of our predecessors, enabling revolutionaries of the present to enrich their consciousnesses. I personally believe that there is a tremendous amount of insight into the radical personality to be gleaned by Polonsky's THE WORLD ABOVE & Saxton's THE GREAT MIDLAND--including the matters of romantic & sexual relations. I also have found tremendous inspiration for anti-racist commitment in Maund's THE BIG BOXCAR & Sanford's THE PEOPLE FROM HEAVEN. From Bonosky's BURNING VALLEY I saw for the first time the potential for a Catholic commitment to become the site of revolutionary politics. But one thing of which I am definitely skeptical is the whole tradition of Marxist parties trying to "lead" a cultural movement, especially by encouraging the creation of a "revolutionary" literature. Whatever one's intentions at the outset, this leads too often to judging literature by immediate political line or by interpretations of mainly one feature of the writing (ignoring the ambiguities & contradictions of the reception process). In my view, James T. Farrell's A NOTE ON LITERARY CRITICISM remains a useful beginning guide to the problems in this area, even though Farrell, writing in the heat of the 1930s, is a bit overpolemical (and satirical) in his characterizations of various positions.

    5) How's the series going? How many books so far, how many are planned? Is the Press happy with it so far?

    The series is off to a solid start, with nearly a dozen books available & several more in preparation, but there are important problems. Many of these stem from the limited resources of a university press. There are limited funds available (I work on a volunteer basis; authors of Introductory essays receive only $250 per essay), which means that we haven't been able to get titles where the copyright holder demands even modest fees, or where we can't inexpensively reproduce the text (from a high quality copy of an earlier edition). So there have been delays and some of our projected titles, particularly by Black authors, have yet to appear.

    I would say that the Introductions prepared for the Illinois editions have consistently been of superior quality. In some cases, our Introduction offers of the only serious scholarship available on the book or its author--in regard to Lumpkin, Wolfert, Maund, Bonosky, Polonsky, Sanford, & so on. Even in the case of Herbst, who has been the subject of several books, we managed to get a first-rate reconsideration of PITY IS NOT ENOUGH. The introductions are designed to make the text user-friendly to the general reader & also for classroom use. Despite their use of cointemporary theoretical concerns, the Introductions are relatively jargon free; each contains a comprehensive bibliography of sources & reviews.

    The biggest problem is sales, which are not good. Despite many excellent reviews in THE NATION & elsewhere--which pleases the press--only one book, SALOME OF THE TENEMENTS, has surpassed the 2000 sales mark, which is really necessary for the series to survive. TO MAKE MY BREAD has done decently, but many others have sold less than a thousand. Soon the press will be appointing a new Director, which means that various series will be reviewed. If we can't improve sales, there is the risk that it will be discontinued.


    READING THE LEFT is a nonsectarian & highly subjective review of material being published in, widely speaking, the left press--magazines, newspapers, books, etc. Interviews with authors & editors, excerpts, musings, & the occasional letter will be included. For more information, please mail Chris at cfaatz@teleport.com.


    SEARCH | 50s HOME | READING LIST | NEWS | FILREIS HOME

    Document URL: http://www.english.upenn.edu/~afilreis/50s/wald-interview.html


    http://einsys.einpgh.org:8881/MARION?S=POLITICAL+POETRY



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    9001 --



    9001 -- http://www.libertad.org.mx/acerca.htm
    Dr. C. M. Fosalba (biografia y textos de un médico anarquista - Uruguay)

    El Anarquismo en la Historia de Cuba; por C. Estefania

    El Mensaje Anarquista a través de la Música - Subte4 (Perú)

    Kolectivo Alternativa Libertaria (Puerto Rico)

    Pagina de Manuel Formoso (Costa Rica)

    Tierra y Libertad - Latinos Libres from USA (castellano-english) ? http://www.libertad.org.mx/Direc.htm#anchor1010614



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    9001 --



    9001 -- Anarchy in Kansas: Moses Harman, Lucifer, the Light-Bearer, Clarence Lee Swartz, Lois Nichols Waisbrooker, Charles T Fowler, Gaspar C. Clemens, Victor Yarros http://world.std.com/~bbrigade/anarchy%20in%20kansas%20%231


    9001 -- With this personalism is connected a primordial anarchistic element in my world-outlook, which separated me off from other Russian thinkers of the XX Century, & separated me off also from the Marxists......

    Khomyakov was uniquely original as an anarchist in contrast with Vl. Solov'ev & this also made him characteristically a Russian thinker. K. Leont'ev sensed the modernist & reformist character of the ideas of Khomyakov, he saw in them elements, detestable to him, of liberalism, democratism, humanism.

    Nikolai Berdyaev 1874 - 1948 http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/Philosophy/Sui-Generis/Berdyaev/essays/rsr.htm



    9001 -- It is not coincidental, I think, that neither John Boone nor Frank Chalmers (nor the anarchist Arkady Bogdanov, for that matter) survives the first novel, representing, as they do, the opposite poles of cynicism & idealistic populism, both doomed initially to failure, but for very different reasons, in this thought experiment. Robinson is after something else, this first book in the series tells us, but since I don't have time to talk about all three books, I will confine myself here to the contrast between Chalmers & Boone, & the impasse their views represent in terms of a Utopian (or as Joanna Russ calls it, optopian (Foote 59)) society on Mars.

    "But Marxists are Hegelian, sir": The Crisis of Modernity in Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars By Nancy E. Batty, Red Deer College, Alberta, Canada http://www.batty.net/Red%20Mars%20paper.htm


    9001 -- eric drooker http://robwalker.net/html_docs/drooker.html


    9001 -- Return to main page

    This archive contains samples of work from dozens of radical poets. It's not intended to be a comprehensive or exhaustive archive, but to give exposure to beautiful passionate radical poetry. It's also not intended to cheat the artists out of royalties but to increase the exposure & demand for their writings, (since I don't post complete works) resulting in higher quality popularity & more book sales. So spread the poetry around, & buy from indie book stores! this archive is dead electric current take this poetry to the living, it's a spoken storytelling so speak it, & use it to inspire spontaneously on windowboxes or soapboxes, it's time for poetry to breathe again.

    Kenneth Rexroth Kahlil Gibran
    Percy Shelley

    Voltaraine De Cleyre
    Carl Sandburg

    Federico Garcia Lorca

    Oscar Wilde

    Ralph Waldo Emerson

    William Blake

    Diane Di Prima

    George Woodcock

    Robert Creeley

    Robert Duncan

    Micheal McClure

    Gary Snyder

    John Henry Mackay

    Parker Tyler

    Herbert Read
    Conrad Aiken

    Weldon Kees

    Alex Comfort

    B. Traven

    William S Borroughs

    Judith Malina

    Allen Ginsberg

    Monica Sjoo

    Elizabeth Smart

    Dave Cunliffe

    Tom Earley

    Lawrence Ferlinghetti

    James Laughlin

    Ursula Le Guin

    Phillip Levine

    Marge Piercy

    Patricia V T West

    Kenneth Patchen

    Adrian Mitchell

    Tina Morris

    Muriel Rukeyser

    John Cage


    City Lights Books 
    Phone 1-415-362-8193 
    Fax: 1-415-362-4921 
    261 Columbus Avenue 
    San Francisco, CA  94133 
     City Lights Bookstore  run by Lawrence Ferlinghetti 
    and publisher of a good number of the poets sampled on this page.


    ~ Autonomedia ~ Radical Publisher Box 568 - Williamsburg Station , Brooklyn, NY 11211-0568 Phone/Fax: 1-718-963-2603 -
    E-mail: autonomedia@aol.com
    Autonomedia/ Semiotexte Homepage


    Black Sparrow Press - Great Publisher of great underground poets
    24 TENTH STREET, SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 95401, USA
    Phone (707) 579-4011 / Fax (707) 579-0567
    Email books@blacksparrowpress.com


    Viet Nam Generation, Inc. & Burning Cities Press ~
     201 E. 50 Street, New York, NY
     Phone 1-800-726-0600 Viet Nam Generation, Inc. & Burning Cities Press 
    PO Box 13746, Tucson, AZ 35732-3755
    FAX: 520/733-3755 ~
    E-mail: Kalital@minerva.cis.yale.edu


    Charles H Kerr Publishing Company- radical Publisher started by an anarchist named Charles 
    Kerr right before Haymarket. Has published sandburg, london, & mother Jones among others.

    "At the age of 111 in 1997, the Kerr Company---a not-for-profit, worker-owned cooperative educational association---is not only a living link with the most vital radical traditions of the past, but also an organic part of today's struggles for peace and justice in an ecologically balanced world.
    Unlike most other alternative publishers, the Kerr Company has never been subsidized by any political party, never had any "angels," never received any grants.
    Our aim today remains what it always has been: to publish books that will make this planet a good place to live!"

    E-Mail- beasley@mcs.com


    Black Planet Books - Anarchist & Radical Publisher


    AK Press is the biggest anarchist distro & publisher in the US


    Left Bank Books






    9001 -- MONSTRUM

    By Donald James Century/Random House Australia RRP: $ 19.95

    Russia in the early years of the twenty-first century: a civil war has subsided into an uneasy peace; Police Inspector Constantin Vadim is plucked from the backwater of Murmansk to head up an investigation in the decaying & crime-ridden Red Presnya district of Moscow. His task: to solve a succession of brutal murders committed by a killer who has become a terrifying local legend: The Monstrum.

    But Vadim has never investigated a murder. The real reason for his transfer is his uncanny resemblance to the new vice-president, Koba - Vadim is his double. Why then has he been given the impossible mission to find The Monstrum? Is the case in some way linked to the new government? Vadim finds himself at one moment on the bloodstained social fringe of Moscow & the next at the very centre of the new Russia - a position which also attracts the attention of his estranged wife, Julia Petrovna, a general in the defeated Anarchist army. Her capture would be a high prize for the men who run Vadim's life. & as Vadim pursues The Monstrum these two worlds move inexorably closer to one another, threatening both to crush the inspector before he can capture the killer & the emerging democracy before it is fully formed.

    "Monstrum is an original - both a sophisticated thriller & a thought-provoking novel which looks into the future of that most turbulent of countries, Russia. I read Monstrum at warp speed, & with real pleasure." - Richard North Patterson

    Excerpt: Monstrum. By the time of the third murder, it was a word evoked by every shout of alarm, by every blast on a militia whistle, by every woman's scream in a district of Moscow where shouts & screams had never been uncommon. Within a week of the third murder there were the beginnings of a cult: the word appeared as elaborately worked graffiti on concrete walls; young men swaggered the streets with the word emblazoned across the back of their jackets; in the cellar discos, reckless girls wore T-shirts with the Monstrum's swollen hands engulfing their breasts.

    But on the streets all women are equal. At night they hurry home no longer thinking of footpads & snatched purses. A new word - Monstrum - has entered their vocabulary of terror. Like a rising tide of infected river water, the word washes against the shanty houses of Red Presnya, swilling through the lives of the inhabitants of the dark alleys & ruined tower blocks, leaving a scum of fear.

    All this was happening in Moscow in the year 2015, the year Russians had begun to think of as the New Dawn.





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    9001 --




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    9001 --
    http://picturebook.nothingness.org/pbook/of11/display/75


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    9001 -- Picturebooks at nothingness.org 1936 -- The Spanish Revolution The Ex 1. Images I [browse] 2. Revolution [browse] 3. The Collectives [browse] In 1986, the Dutch band The Ex released a double 7" record housed in the endsleeves of a beautiful, hard-cover book. Inside was a brief history of the Spanish Revolution & page after page of original photographs from the CNT archives of the Institute for Social History in Amsterdam. These pages are being compiled in order to make available those same photographs on the web, & the opening of this site corresponds to a re-release of the original 1936 record (now on CD!). Currently under construction!
    http://picturebook.nothingness.org/pbook/of11/display/75



    9001 -- ~ Ethel Mannin ~

    A Biographical Sketch of a Friend & Acquaintance of Aleister Crowley

    Ethel Edith Mannin was born in 1900. There is no indication that the author ever met Aleister Crowley, although she was a close friend of someone who did, Gwen Otter. It seems, according to her biography Confessions & Impressions, (1) that one day while she was visiting Gwen's house in Chelsea she noticed on the wall opposite the fireplace, "a John (2) lithograph of Alister {sic} Crowley, that high priest of black magic who likes nothing better that to be regarded as His Satanic Majesty the Prince of Darkness, & who would take it as a compliment to be called an arch-devil." She continues by stating that she knew "Crowley is one of Gwen Otter's oldest friends" & so she decided to ask Gwen to tell her "the truth about him & the dark stories of drugs and black mass circulating about him."

    Regrettably Ethel Mannin gives very little detail of her conversation with Gwen Otter but she does state that Gwen's attitude was similar to that of "a woman artist" she knew, but doesn't identify, "who once had a studio next door to his apartment." Further stating, "that there is no clearly definable truth about him; save that he is a poseur who has come to believe in his own poses-so that they are no longer poses-and that having built up this sinister reputation for himself he goes on playing up to it." Unfortunately Ethel Mannin gives no further information as to what Gwen Otter might have said about Aleister Crowley.

    She died in 1984.

    NOTES:

    1 Ethel Mannin, Confessions & Impressions, Chapter Fifteen: "Gwen Otter, Portrait of a Bohemian" (London: Jarrolds Publishers, 1931), p.195.

    2 Augustus John (1879-1961), a leading British portrait painter & etcher born in Wales, was also a friend of Aleister Crowley.

    Articles about Ethel Mannin WGP7/2/13 A Dictionary of Literature in the English Language, a focus on Ethel, Edith Mannin, pp552-553.
    WGP7/2/14 Article on Ethel Mannin, pp709-710.
    WGP7/2/15 Article on Ethel Mannin, pp440-442.
    WGP7/2/16 Article on Ethel Mannin, miscellaneous pages, from Priveleged Spectator.
    WGP7/2/17 Article on Ethel Mannin, from Kunitz & Haycroft: Twentieth Century Authors, pp905-906. Also includes Walter Greenwood.
    Attached to: The Authors’ & Writers’ Who’s Who, 1971, The Penguin Companion to Literature, 1971, The New Cambridge Bibliograohy of English Literature, vol.4, 1972.
    WGP7/2/18 Ethel Mannin: the Red Rose of Love & the Red Flower of Liberty, by Andy Croft, pp205-225. From, Rediscovering Forgotten Radicals: British Women Writers 1889-1939 (ed) Angela Ingram & Daphne Patai, University of North Carolina Press, 1993.

    http://www.redflame93.com/Mannin.html

    http://www.ais.salford.ac.uk/publica/speccoll/wgp7.pdf

    9001 -- 1. Jean Baudrillard Baudrillard, Postmodernism, & the Reinforcement of Power, by Noah Raizman: http://landow.stg.brown.edu/cpace/theory/baudrillard/raizman.html Boundaries & Borderlines: Reflections on Jean Baudrillard & Critical Theory, by Douglas Kellner: http://www.uta.edu/huma/illuminations/kell2.htm Disneyworld Company, by Jean Baudrillard: http://www.ctheory.com/e25-disneyworld_comp.html Dueling Paradigms: Modernist v. Postmodernist Thought, by Dragan Milovanovic: http://sun.soci.niu.edu/~critcrim/papers/drag-pomo.html The Perfect Crime, by Jean Baudrillard: http://www.netby.net/Oest/Hyperion-Alle/Simulation/articles/perfect_crime.htm Radical Thought, by Jean Baudrillard: http://www.ctheory.com/a25-radical_thought.html Reversion of History, by Jean Baudrillard: http://www.ctheory.com/a-reversion_of_history.html Strike Of Events, by Jean Baudrillard: http://www.ctheory.com/a-strike_of_events.html 2. Michel Foucault The Archæology of Knowledge, by Michel Foucault: http://werple.net.au/~gaffcam/phil/foucault.htm Excerpt from "Madness, the Absence of Work" by Michel Foucault, translated by Peter Stastny & Denis Sengel: http://www2.uchicago.edu/jnl-crit-inq/v21/v21n2.foucault.html Foucault & the Critique of Modernity, by Douglas Kellner: http://ccwf.cc.utexas.edu/~kellner/pm/ch2.html Foucault: A Lover's Discourse About Madness & the Media: http://www.criticism.com/md/foucault.html Foucault's Subject of Power: gopher://lists.village.virginia.edu:70/00/pubs/listservs/spoons/foucault.archive/papers/patton Foucault & Truffaut: Power & Social Control in French Society: http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~dberger/papers/English_Papers/trouffalt/trouffalt.htm Implications of Foucault's Disciplinary Society, by M. Thaxter Dickey: http://mall.cftnet.com/dickey/foucault.htm Power/Knowledge, Society, & Truth: Notes on Foucault's work by Mathieu Deflem: http://www.sla.purdue.edu/people/soc/mdeflem/zfouc.html 3. Fredric Jameson Fredric Jameson, The Political Unconscious: http://odin.english.udel.edu/teague/krajkovich1.html Postmodernism, or The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism, by Fredric Jameson: http://www.spc.uchicago.edu/ssr1/PRELIMS/Strat/stadd.html#JAMESON G. Integrating Philosophies: Changing the World 1. Noam Chomsky Force & Opinion, by Noam Chomsky: http://www.zmag.org/chomsky/articles/z9107-force-opinion.html How the media works, by Noam Chomsky: http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/Senate/3761/how.html Language & Mind, by Noam Chomsky: http://werple.net.au/~gaffcam/phil/chomsky.htm Whose World Order: Conflicting Visions, by Noam Chomsky: http://www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~gharris/ 2. Daniel Cohn-Bendit Daniel Cohn-Bendit: http://www.oeko-net.de/eurospeed/dcbeng.htm May 68: France's month of revolution: http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~socappeal/1968/may68.html Revolution Adjourned: http://freedom.tao.ca/1968/procras.html 3. Franz Fanon Wretched of the Earth, by Franz Fanon: http://werple.net.au/~lynnbea/lib/fanon.htm Youth & Social Control The Children & Psychology, by Paul Goodman: http://freedom.tao.ca/goodman.html Colorado Massacre No Surprise, by Susan Jankowski: http://www.eatthestate.org/03-32/ColoradoMassacreNo.htm A Consideration of the Shootings in Littleton, Colorado, by Megan Shaw: http://eserver.org/bs/editors/1999-4-28.html Delinquency Then & Now, by Tony Gibson: http://freedom.tao.ca/Raven/crime.html Education or Processing? by Lyn Olsen: http://freedom.tao.ca/Raven/edu3.html Guide To Student Protesting: http://www.spunk.org/library/misc/sp000524.txt Public Schools: Designed to destroy individual thought: http://www.people.memphis.edu/~dhenke/schools.htm Virtual Missing Children. by Mike Mosher: http://eserver.org/bs/38/mosher.html Young Offenders & Popular Myths, by Reginald Pakosz: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Agora/9095/offenders.html Youth & the Public Schools: http://www.people.memphis.edu/~dhenke/education.htm http://www.policestudies.eku.edu/POTTER/21critical.htm



    9001 --
    back home
    kirk noreen
    executive director


    Kirk Noreen, an American composer, was born in Seattle in 1970.  He studied with Alan Stout, C. P. First, and Jay Alan Yim at Northwestern University in Chicago.  He founded the Ensemble Sospeso in 1995 with colleague Joshua Cody in Seattle; in 1999 Sospeso moved operations to New York.  

    Although he has not worked in the electronic medium, Mr Noreen gives a priority to material of sound & texture well before the question of individual style that preoccupy many composers.   His music is highly rhythmic, often characterized by superimposed ostinati, & it displays a great sensitivity to the weight of musical material as a determining factor in form.  Drama is built up through accumulation, rather than through contrast.  

    Mr Noreen's setting of American experimental poet Jackson Mac Low, Ziani (1999), shows some influence of Helmut Lachenmann  in its expansion of instrumental vocabulary.  But direct compositional influences on his work are often difficult to ascertain.  Visual arts are an important inspiration for Mr Noreen.  The multi-movement chamber ensemble work Oh Shining—Homage to Cy Twombly (1998) is 'painterly,' but not in the superficial imitation of expressionist gesture as one might expect.  It is rather the composer's approach to the materiality of musical texture that is very much analogous to a painter's handling of his or her material.  A deliberate & almost massive homogeneity within each movement, coupled with an absence of traditional unifying gestures from one movement to another, further suggest a painter's triptych.    

     

    to the previous composer back to composers to the next composer
     
      Sospeso Ltd. © 2000 Joshua Cody




    9001 --




    9001 -- TO DO add blood UPDATES [Fwd: Stamp act revised?...] Date: Tue, 22 May 2001 01:03:24 -0700 Subject: Stamp act revised?... Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 10:55:58 -0700 From: "Dave, Recollection Books" To: David Willson http://www.artgonepostal.com/


    blood to add ADD BLOOD 6/11 Burn site update Add Addresses opening graphic http://tierra.ucsd.edu/images/france/f11.gif see new address for Burn site at San Diego, censored from http://burn.ucsd.edu/ new site: http://tierra.ucsd.edu/ images address: http://tierra.ucsd.edu/images/ new image with Debord quote:


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    ADD TO SIML
    [Note: This poem is one of the eight items cited for violation of the Espionage act from the August issue of The Masses, causing the magazine to fold. It is a tribute to Alexander Berkman & Emma Goldman.]

    A Tribute

    Emma Goldman & Alexander Berkman
    Are in prison,
    Although the night is tremblingly beautiful
    And the sound of water climbs down the rocks
    And the breath of the night air moves through
         multitudes & multitudes of leaves
    That love to waste themselves for the sake of
         the summer.

    Emma Goldman & Alexander Berkman
    Are in prison tonight,
    But they have made themselves elemental forces,
    Like the water that climbs down the rocks:
    Like the wind in the leaves:
    Like the gentle night that holds us:
    They are working on our destinies:
    They are forging the love of the nations:
    ....................
    Tonight they lie in prison.




    A Tribute

    Josephine Bell





    Published: The Masses, August, 1917


    http://www.artgonepostal.com/

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    9001 -- WTO http://www.attrition.org/gallery/


    9002 -- Libertarian Heritage No. 12

    Guy Aldred (1886-1963):
    The Socialist as Libertarian

    By Chris R. Tame

    Libertarian Heritage No. 12

    ISSN 0959-566X                   ISBN 1 85637 254 5
    An occasional publication of the Libertarian Alliance,
    25 Chapter Chambers, Esterbrooke Street, London SW1P 4NN, England.

    www.libertarian.co.uk                email: admin@libertarian.co.uk

    © 1994: Libertarian Alliance; Chris R. Tame.

    Chris R. Tame is the Director of the Libertarian Alliance. He broadcasts regularly, & has contributed to a wide range of scholarly journals & magazines. A version of this essay first appeared in The Match, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1975.

    The views expressed in this publication are those of its author, and
    not necessarily those of the Libertarian Alliance, its Committee,
    Advisory Council or subscribers.

    LA Director: Chris R. Tame
    Editorial Director: Brian Micklethwait
    Webmaster: Dr. Sean Gabb

    The Libertarian Alliance

    FOR LIFE, LIBERTY & PROPERTY

    In the many contemporary considerations of the history of anarchist thought & action the name of Guy Aldred is notable only for its virtually complete absence. Yet Aldred deserves to be rescued from the obscurity to which he has, since his death in 1963, been so rapidly & thoroughly consigned. He merits a place in the historical gallery of such figures as Gustav Landauer & Domela Niewehuis, those who fought to maintain an anarchist or libertarian meaning for socialism in an age when its predominant interpretation and implementation was as authoritarian statism.

    Life ...

    Born in London in 1886, Aldred made his first public impact at the age of 16 as a child evangelist of the sort common at the time. By the age of 18, however, he had become an atheist & shortly thereafter embarked on his life-long career as an exponent of anarcho-communism. Aldred's life was characterised by a remarkable vigour & dedication to the furtherance of "progressive" causes. By the time of his death he had edited five periodicals — The Herald of Revolt, The Spur, The Commune, The Council, and The Word —and had engaged in such diverse causes as that of Indian independence, the distribution of birth control literature, & anti-war agitation before, & anti-conscription agitation during, World War II.

    ... & Work

    But rather than the memory of a life of undaunted activism, it is Aldred's intellectual heritage with which I am primarily concerned here. He was a prolific writer & left a large body of work which includes autobiography, biographical and critical studies of other libertarians (his works Bakunin and Richard Carlisle are still concise & valuable introductions to their subjects), commentary on current events & numerous polemics & theoretical statements. & what is remarkable throughout the large proportion of this work is the timeless quality & relevance of its libertarian message.

    Socialism, Communism & Freedom

    Aldred generally spoke of himself as a socialist or communist (he used the terms synonymously) without the addition of the "anarcho-" tag — for liberty was always a basic and indispensable part of his conception of socialism. In Aldred's view, just as Noam Chomsky has more recently argued, socialism was a fundamentally libertarian phenomenon, the rightful inheritor of the Classical Liberalism & Radicalism of the eighteenth century & the Enlightenment. Following Bakunin he declared that "Anarchism, the negation of authority, the negation of priestcraft, was the essential factor in all real Socialism ... Anarchism defines Socialism as Submission defines Capitalism."[1] Although, again like Bakunin, Aldred accepted historical materialism and Marxian economics, he could only deplore both Marx's personal authoritarianism & his intellectual ambiguities and the subsequent "authoritarian conceptions of communism for which the ultra-Marxians stood."

    Thus, although in 1940 he still entitled one of his collections of essays Studies In Communism he felt constrained, as he put it, because "Soviet Russia (had) identified Communism completely with authority", to retitle one of its major theoretical pieces, "The Case for Communism", as "The Case for Anarchism".

    For Aldred, then, it was Bakunin who logically complemented Marx, & to those who asserted that Bakunin "was Proudhon adulterated by Marx & Marx expounded by Proudhon," he replied that "[t]o my mind, it means that Bakunin is an excellent guide, philosopher & friend to the cause of Communism."[2]

    Critique of the 'Left'

    Aldred, in fact, never ceased his denunciation of the directions which the major parts of the 'Left' had taken. He gave short shrift to the twin reformisms of trade unionism and parliamentary socialism, indicting both as reactionary, statist, & disastrous in their consequences: "trade unionism has accomplished nothing so far as the wellbeing of the entire working-class is concerned."[3] Similarly, "parliamentarianism has ended in militarism & war, & has wasted this long struggle toward a new order ... The labor leaders have sold their birthright, loyalty to peace & freedom, for a mess of potage, place & career within the national constitution of capitalism."[4]

    And while virtually the entire 'Left' rushed to prostrate itself before the monstrous statism of the Soviet Union, Aldred never hesitated to denounce what he saw as a travesty of all he had believed Communism to stand for. He frankly identified the "mediaeval terror" to which "scientific socialism" had descended & called upon the workers "to organise to destroy the Communist Party & Stalin terrorism, and to rank it with Fascism & all other terrorism."[5]

    Feminism

    We should not neglect to mention, albeit in passing, Aldred's rejection of sexual collectivism & the hypocrisy of marriage. His pamphlet Socialism & Marriage (originally published in 1907) was especially notable for its incisive attack on Christianity's role in the repression of women. "For a thousand years the insane & inane denunciation of women has been the teaching of Christendom." Proclaiming the self-sovereignty of women over their own lives & bodies he was quite resolute in his belief that "[t]he function of women is not to share barracks with man & bear his children."[6]

    Socialism & Freedom

    But what is most vital & significant in Aldred's work, however, remains his never ceasing proclamation of what he saw as the libertarian essence of socialism, his belief that socialism "can only have its expression in an era of freedom".[7] While the Soviet Union had made the term communism "identical with dictatorship & totalitarian oppression, assassination & darkness",[8] Aldred looked back to the struggles & ideals of so many in earlier times. "It is impossible to believe," he wrote, "that the working men who rallied round John Burns at Trafalgar Square or marched in procession past the Carlton Club, conceived of Socialism meaning the perpetuation of persecution, firing squads, & the supremacy of the State."[9]

    Certainly, Aldred never manifest that pathological & reactionary hostility to individuality which has so undeniably and unfortunately characterised such a large proportion of the socialist "mainstream", that is, the "communism" & "kind of 'oceanic' yearning for the shucking-off of one's individuality" which Hal Draper once commented upon.[10] Rather, he declared outright that "( u) nderlying progress is the first law of Nature, the law of self-preservation ... it (is) self-interest which dictated (man's) growth in wisdom & in moral righteousness. Selfishness lies at the root of all social & industrial development."[11]

    While advocating "social ownership based in social production and distribution" & a "sound & sane collectivism",[12] this was done for the sake of, & in terms of, a "practical individualism"[13] & not in the reactionary holistic terms of the alleged ethical necessity of the suppression of the individual for some 'higher' end or for some alleged collective entity.

    Some Criticisms

    But, of course, whether Aldred's "practical individualism" and "social ownership" could, in practice, really attain the liberty he so desired is another matter. He may have believed that he had effectively synthesised individualism & liberty with collectivist organisation, but his own writings never really descended from the level of glittering generality, never evidenced any appreciation of the difficulties involved, nor portrayed any concrete proposals as to how those difficulties might be overcome. & is it really overly cynical to ask, after long experience of the actual, demonstrated preferences of the masses, whether Aldred's vision of a "real", libertarian socialism as the "genuine socialism of the proletariat" is anything more than a naive & pretentious illusion?

    Nevertheless, Aldred undoubtedly deserves a place in the minds & memories of those concerned with the struggle for liberty. Whether his own ideal of anarcho-communism constitutes more than a fruitless & ultimately untenable synthesis will be, however, a question to which classical liberals, free market anarchists & collectivist "anarchists" will give very different answers.

    Notes

    1. "Bakunin", in Pioneers of Anti-Parliamentarianism, The Strickland Press, Glasgow, 1940, p. 6.

    2. Bakunin, The Strickland Press, Glasgow, 1940, p. 47.

    3. "Trade Unionism & the Class War", in Studies in Communism, The Strickland Press, Glasgow, 1940, p. 26.

    4. "Foreword" to Pioneers of Anti-Parliamentarianism, op. cit., p. 4.

    5. "Against Terrorism in the Workers Struggle", in Studies in Communism, op. cit., p. 53.

    6. In ibid., pp. 42, 49.

    7. "Representation & the State", in ibid., p. 21.

    8. "Forword", ibid., p. 21.

    9. Ibid., p. 21

    10. Hal Draper, "The Two Souls of Socialism", Our Generation, January 1969.

    11. "The Case for Anarchism", Studies, p. 9.

    12. "Representation & the State", p. 18, "The Case for Anarchism", p. 8., ibid.

    13. "The Case for Anarchism", ibid, p. 8.

    Bibliographical Note

    Since this essay was first published two longer & more detailed studies of Aldred have appeard: Nicholas Walter, "Guy Aldred (1886-1963)", The Raven: Anarchist Quarterly, Vol. I, No. 1.; & John Taylor Caldwell, Come Dungeons Dark: The Life & Tikes of Guy Aldred, Luath Press, Ayrshire, 1988. These, & some of Aldred's writings, are available from Freedom Press, Angel Alley, 84b Whitechapel High Street, London, E1 7QX.




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    9002 -- Free Speech League.

    Some significant yet often-ignored controversies that arose in the years from the 1870s to the outbreak of World War I include The federal "Comstock" Act of 1873 being used to prosecute Ezra Heywood, the author of Cupid's Yokes, a pamphlet advocating free love, & Moses Harmon, publisher of Lucifer: The Light-Bearer, a journal which called for "free press, free rostrum, free mails . . . free land, free homes, free food, free drink, free medicine, free Sunday, free marriage & free divorce".

    There were also the Industrial Workers of the World's free speech fights, twenty-one of which occurred between 1909 & 1913. These struggles raised questions regarding access to public property & the distinction between speech & action.

    "To a significant extent, the issues & categories of analysis that arose during the free speech fights are similar to those that dominate current interpretation of the First Amendment"

    See David M. Rabban, Free Speech in Its Forgotten Years, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997

    Most American historians & legal scholars incorrectly assume that controversies & litigation about free speech began abruptly during World War I. However, there was substantial debate about free speech issues between the Civil War and World War I. Important free speech controversies, often involving the activities of sex reformers & labor unions, preceded the Espionage Act of 1917. Scores of legal cases presented free speech issues to Justices Holmes and Brandeis. A significant organization, the Free Speech League, became a principled defender of free expression two decades before the establishment of the ACLU in 1920. World War I produced a major transformation in American liberalism. Progressives who had viewed constitutional rights as barriers to needed social reforms came to appreciate the value of political dissent during its wartime repression. They subsequently misrepresented the prewar judicial hostility to free speech claims & obscured prior libertarian defenses of free speech based on commitments to individual autonomy.

    http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/lhr/19.1/br_15.html
    Research: see also http://www.ulwaf.com/LA-1900s/03.10.html
    http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Goldman/Exhibition/freespeech.html
    http://www.uark.edu/depts/comminfo/freespeech/schroeder.html
    http://www.ulwaf.com/LA-1900s/03.10.html
    http://www.boondocksnet.com/editions/progressive/pmwm30.html

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    9002 -- ?



    9002 -- STYLE SHEET SAMPLE

    Julian Beck & Judith Malina:
    The Living Theater

    "I CALL FOR A THEATRE IN WHICH THE ACTORS ARE LIKE VICTIMS BURNING AT THE STAKE, SIGNALLING THROUGH THE FLAMES." - Antonin Artaud




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    9002 -- img saved images 2


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    9002 --


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    9002 -- http://www.geocities.com/knightrose.geo/


    9002 -- BOOK REVIEW -

    MAN! - AN ANTHOLOGY OF ANARCHIST IDEAS, ESSAYS, POETRY & COMMENTARIES Edited by M. Graham, Cienfuegos Press 1974

    This 640 page book is a testimony to the personal persistence of one man Marcus Graham.

    Marcus Graham was born in Derohoi Romania in 1893. In 1974 at the age of 82 with the help of Cienfuegos Press in England he cobbled together this 640 page contribution to anarchist thought & practice. In 1907 at the age of 14 he migrated with his family to the land of milk and honey, the United States. Over the next twenty six years he became deeply involved in the United States Anarchist movement. In 1917 he was swept up in the deportation hysteria that saw Emma Goldman, Alexander Berkman & many other anarchist immigrants who had lived in the United States for over twenty years deported to their country of origin.

    Although the United States government tried to deport him in 1917 and again in 1921, he managed on both occasions to stay in the country. Marcus was involved in a number of anarchist publishing ventures. In 1932 he became involved in a venture to establish a new Anarchist Monthly sponsored by English, Chinese, Italian & Yiddish speaking anarchists. The first issue of Man appeared in January 1933 and continued to be produced on a monthly basis until May 1940, when the United States government forced its closure.

    Cientuegos Press has taken the essays that appeared in Man & reprinted them in this volume, not in chronological order but under a number of headings, Ideas of Anarchism (1-199), Roosevelts America (200-240), Crime & Criminals (241-263), Fascism (264-279), Marxism (280-301), Spain (302-315), Religion & the Democracies (316-326), Resistance (327-334), Controversial Issues Among Anarchists (335-353), Art & Life (354-381), Literature (382-396), Book & Drama Reviews (397-422), Poems (423-437), Government Persecution of Anarchists (438-540), Anarchists (541-610), Man (611-640).

    Man consisted of reprints of some of the old classics, information on what was happening in the world between 1933-1940, historical titbits, poetry & reviews. I find some of the essays lively, others are tedious to the point of boredom. Man like any other anarchist weekly or monthly is a mixed bag of the brilliant & the mundane, the informative and the obtuse. Man provides an insight into another time & another era. Anybody who takes the time to wade through this book will come away with a feel for a period when the triumph of authoritarian movements across the globe made it difficult for anarchists to survive let alone carry on political activity.

    from Anarchist Age Weekly Review 16th - 22nd March, 1998


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    9002 -- kropotkin aural http://cybermedia.uh.edu:8080/ramgen/uhrm4/engines/engines_episode_0720_56.rm william godwin

    Blake was acquainted with a political circle that included such well-known radicals as William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, & Thomas Paine, & the democratic revolutions in America & France became major themes in much of Blake's poetry.

    Throughout his life, booksellers employed Blake to engrave illustrations for a wide variety of publications. This work brought him into contact with many of the radical thinkers of his day, including bookseller Joseph Johnson & fellow artists John Flaxman and Henry Fuseli. Blake drew literary notice at gatherings in the home of the Reverend & Mrs. A. S. Mathew, where he read his poems & occasionally sang to them his own music. http://www.galegroup.com/free_resources/poets/bio/blake_w.htm


    9002 -- archive some of these articles in Iverson http://www.yelah.net/archive/anarchism


    9002 -- http://galeon.hispavista.com/ateneosant/Ateneo/Historia/Principal.htm#1 http://galeon.hispavista.com/ateneosant/Ateneo/Historia/Principal.htm#1


    9002 -- non-western anarchism Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2002 08:42:10 -0500 From: camy matthay To: Marguerite , David Brown To Marguerite & David (my Greenwood Ave friends), This is an interesting article about the history of non-western anarchism, by Jason Adams. I thought it might interest you. http://www.geocities.com/ringfingers/nonwesternweb.html camy a postscript: radical cheerleading! Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2002 From: camy matthay To: Marguerite , David Brown ...I was going to include this as well since it is peculiar & engaging enough... for daily bleed perhaps? (It was pointed out to me by the same guy who turned me on to Jason Adams. http://www.radicalcheers.org/home.html http://www.geocities.com/radicalcheerleaders/ http://www.radicalcheers.org/home.html
    http://www.geocities.com/radicalcheerleaders/

    9002 -- [anarchy_history] Fwd: [ait-iwa-chat] Collectives in the Spanish Revolution Date: Sun, 20 Oct 2002 16:05:42 -0000 From: "Nestor McNab" Reply-To: anarchy_history@yahoogroups.com To: anarchy_history@yahoogroups.com From: "Ben" Subject: [ait-iwa-chat]

    Collectives in the Spanish Revolution

    it's taken a couple of years, but i finally got collectives in the spanish revolution by gason leval up online -- all 355 pages of it. http://www.anarchosyndicalism.org/history/collectives.htm


    Paul Goodman's article "Designing Pacifist Films" is now online at http://www.bopsecrets.org/CF/goodman.htm

    At a time when antiwar communication is increasingly necessary, most "radical media" efforts seem to remain mysteriously ineffective or even unwittingly counterproductive. Goodman's keen insights into both psychological & "aesthetic" factors help to show why this is so, & what might be done differently.

    * * * Texts on related themes at the same website:

    "Guy Debord's Film 'The Society of the Spectacle' " -- http://www.bopsecrets.org/PS/Debordfilm.htm

    "Radical Film" -- http://www.bopsecrets.org/PS/joyrev2.htm "The War & the Spectacle" (on the Gulf war, the media, & various antiwar strategies) -- http://www.bopsecrets.org/PS/gulfwar.htm "Two Local Wars" (Situationist article on the Vietnam & Arab-Israel wars) -- http://www.bopsecrets.org/SI/11.wars.htm "War Is the Health of the State" (Randolph Bourne) -- http://www.bopsecrets.org/CF/bourne.htm "Advantages & Limits of Nonviolence" -- http://www.bopsecrets.org/PS/joyrev2.htm


    9002 -- I’m going to give just one example of each, among de advocates, the biggest example is probably John Turner & his anarchist supply of housing which started with experiments in Peru, for supplying sites & services, developing boundaries for illegal squatters & supplying them with infrastructure services & rules. & this housing projects were founded for the most part by internationals agencies like the World Bank, where John Turner became the advocate of those illegal squatters, helping them to legalize their situation & improving on their conditions through the supply of services. http://www.puc.cl/politicaspublicas/hashimsarkis.htm


    9002 -- ?
    ---
     When I go mad,
    I call my friends by phone:
    I am afraid they might think
    they're alone. 
    ---



    9002 --

    The Anarchists led an active struggle against the socialist parties who used infamies and vile lies to discredit the Anarchists. On the day of the "freedoms" the Anarchists took their message into mass meetings. A little while afterwards repression began & many comrades were arrested. While distributing pamphlets among the soldiers, comrade Victor Rivkind was arrested. He was subsequently shot. A large quantity of weapons & a secret press were seized. In January 1906, sixteen members of the International group were shot, several of them were miners. The other members escaped abroad or were deported to Siberia. In August 1906 the movement revived a bit. Two groups were formed: The Black Curtain & Liberty. In the winter of the same year, the Anarchists were already organizing several strikes making use of economic blackmail.



    In 1907 many arrests were carried out (on one occasion alone twenty-one comrades were thrown into prison). They found a secret lithograph transfer for the newspaper The Revolutionary Voice. There were groups on Lodz, Siedlce, Biata & Creustochowa. In Grodno the Anarchist Friedman killed a jailer for maltreatment dealt out to detainees; pursued by the police he committed suicide, not wanting to be caught alive. In Brzese many acts of expropriation were carried out. There was also a group in Wilna. There were also several groups working for the Anarchist cause abroad.[4] In London in 1907 there was a Polish-Russian Anarchist-Communist Group [5] which published two pamphlets: Thouar's What the Anarchists Want? & Malatesta's Anarchy. In the same year Emile henry's pamphlet, Speech Before the Assize Court was published in Paris.



    The years 1905-1907 caused the interesting personality of Waclaw Machaiski, founder of the system of the "workers' conspiracy" to emerge from the ranks of Polish Anarchism. Born in 1876, he was a patriotic activist in the PPS party but gradualaly he came to anti-intelligentsia views. The chief principle of the International that "the emancipation of the workers should be the task of the workers" he took literally & fought fanatically against any participation, even physical participation, of intellectuals in the workers' movement, believing that intellectuals only tend toward power behind the mask of socialism, revolutionary socialism or even Anarchism (Workers' Conspiracy No. 1). Foretelling the constraints that follow socialism he augured an arrival of a slavish system in which bureaucratic machinery set up by intelligentsia would constrain an ordinary workman. He believed that a single path led to Anarchy: the direct struggle of the workers themselves using the most revolutionary modes of struggle to obtain slight improvements & reforms which will finish by leading us little by little towards society without property or authority. Although strange, he idea is quite interesting. However, Machaiski worked above all among the Russian workers, & his ideas did not have the slightest influence on Anarchism in Poland.



    The years 1904-1907 were the period of the development of Anarchism in Poland. The young movement with only a recent past but profound experience, committed mistakes and errors as every lively & active group has elsewhere. To exchange opinions on these faults of the movement & to try to remedy them in the future, a secret conference of Anarchist-communist groups from Lithuania & Poland took place in June 1907. The discussion was published by the conference's own secret press. Its resolutions were addressed to all workers. We must stop awhile on these resolutions, which read as follows:



    "The Conference records that the general character of our epoch is supremely revolutionary. Each revolution carries within itself deeply de-centralist, essentially Anarchist tendencies. Also, all preceding revolutions have imbued the worker with the Anarchist spirit. It is because of this that, now on the eve of the great revolution, the fooled masses begin to see clearly, & a powerful Anarchist movement, born out of the necessities of our social life, is beginning to develop. But some faults have got in to our young movement. It is precisely the need for examination of these faults that provoked this Conference. The Conference believes that:

    1. A federal organization of all the groups which up to now have been isolated and dispersed id now necessary.
    2. Seeing that the seizures of property that have taken place up until now were frequent but unimportant & badly organized, this has involved a useless waste of strength & the chaotic use of conquered resources; only the complete federation is in the position to carry out considerable seizures of property which are well prepared & from which we can gain most judiciously.
    3. Serious measures must be taken against the provocative attitude of the political parties against the Anarchists.
    4. Having examined the tactics of the Anarchists & of the other parties, the Conference proposes that groups should struggle against the trade unions in whatever form they exist, or under whatever name they appear, as if against a dangerous & perfidious weapon of the bourgeoisie having its aim that of distancing the worker from the path of revolution & of throwing him onto the path of compromise & thus poisoning all revolutionary class-consciousness.
    5. (The Conference) Declares itself in support of mass seizure of foodstuffs during strikes, periods of unemployment, etc. . . .
    6. (The Conference) Permits conspiracy."

    Twenty-four comrades were tried for having been members of this Federation of Anarchist-Communist Groups of Poland & Lithuania. Among them were the German comrade known as Senna hen (Johann Holzman), Kalinin, Kac, Grzeznarowski (twice condemned to death), Kilacrycki, & the women comrades Marcrewska (twice condemned to death), & Malinowska. They were detained for a long time in deplorable conditions. Some became mad as a result of the persecutions of which they were the victims.

    At the International Congress in Amsterdam, Poland was represented by two delegates: I Zielinska & Joseph Schweber.



    The Anarchist movement in Galicia (the Austrian part of Poland) developed independently. In 1907 the newspaper The New Epoch (Leopole) was published & just three editions came out. Another newspaper The Free World (Leopole) was no luckier. Unfortunately we do not have all the details we should like about the activities of the comrades of Galicia. A periodical Utopia was published with the support of Gustav Landauer & Eric Muhsam. The editorial group represented the individualist Anarchist tendency whereas all the others represented the Anarchist-communist trend.



    The active work of Anarcho-syndicalist comrade Augustyn Wroblewski during the years leading up to the war must be mentioned. He was a teacher of chemistry & put out his propaganda at first only among the youth at school & university. He finally put it out among the workers of Krakow. An exceptional personality, he editied several works among which were The Manifesto of Humanity, The Red Religion (Paris 1911), etc. Apart from this, in Krakow, he published the newspaper The Workers' Cause, an Anarchist organ of which more than one issue bore marks of censorship.



    In 1911 in Paris there was a Polish group of Anarchists who edited the Anarcho-syndicalist newspaper Najmita (The Salary). The group was incontact with Russian & Austrain comrades from Poland among whom were the railway workers of the Warsaw area who had prepared the ground for the paper by means of an active program of propaganda. At the same time a revolutionary organ was published in Chicago, probably by the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World], putting forward ideas of Anarchism & Revolutionary Syndicalism. In the U.S. two pamphlets in Polish were published later, also probably by the I.W.W.: Kropotkin's The Necessity of Revolution & Grave's Future Society (a few chapters), & many topical pamphlets were also published. At the same time, the Krakow University Youth, in association with the editors of Najmita, began to publish in monthly installments Kropotkin's The Great French Revolution, & announced the appearance of The State: Its Historic Role. Unfortunately, World War I interrupted the group's work. Only three installments were published (instead of eight) & The State: Its Historic Role did not appear at all.



    In 1914 there was the group International in Warsaw. In 1915 the group in Bialystock once more led an intense course of action: putting out propaganda, organizing strikes, etc.. What particularly intensified activity in all center was news from the Russian Revolution, Bloody Sunday in St Petersburg. These groups took part in terrorist activity as well as propaganda actions such as attempts on police officers' & factory owners' lives. There were also bank robberies to gain funds. Nowadays the majority of us Anarchists entirely reject such methods but to understand the motivation to act in this way it is important to realize the level of cruelty & despotism of the tsar's authority. For example in Warsaw, on Governor general Saklow's order, 16 young anarchists, (about 18 years old) were murdered by the authorities & their bodies thrown into the Vistula. Shots at demonstrating workers were not uncommon either.



    At the same time material popularizing the ideas of Anarcho-syndicalism came pouring in. Adherents of this kind of Anarchism repudiated terrorism claiming it did not contribute to an increase in society's consciousness, but on the contrary averted it from anarchism and caused disarray in the movement. That is why Anarcho-syndicalists encouraged other Anarchists towards propagandistic activity & joining trade unions.



    Anarchist Organization Between the World Wars



    During the inter-war period Syndicalist ideas had repercussion in the Union of Trade Unions (Zwiazek Zwiazkow Zawodowych--ZZZ in Polish) this was 130,000 strong & active from 1931-1939. The association presented itself to join the IWA. It is still active today and assembles Anarcho-Syndicalist & Syndicalist trade unions. During the war the ZZZ and other organizations formed the Polish Syndicalist Union (Zwiazek Syndykalistyczny Polski--ZSP in Polish) which actively battled against Fascists. However it was not isolated from other formations & co-operated with the National Army ('royal army'--Armia Krolewski--AK) & the People's Army ('popular army'--Armia Ludowy--AL). An illegal newssheet, The Syndicalist, was published & ZSP detachments took part in the Warsaw Uprising.



    Anarchism After World War II



    Anarchistic ideas reappeared after World War II as the Alternative Societies movement and in the early 1980s as the Sigma club. Other groups like the Autonomous Anarchistic Federation of Lublin, Freedom & Peace, Intercity Anarchistic Federation and Orange Alternative shot up like mushrooms after that. They were all active against the Communist system however as distinct from Solidarity ('Solidarnosc' or 'Narodowy Solidarnosc Zwiazkow Zawodowych'--NSZZ in Polish) they defended themselves with irony & humor & refusing to join the army than more traditional methods. A lot of the radical ecological activists came form these movements. Some still exist & there are new ones as well such as Social Activity Membership in Slupsk. Anarchist ideas of the workers movement found a lot of support. A group of the Anarchist Federation published a paper Works in Nova Huta.



    The original Solidarity which had a lot of Syndicalist features in its program. "The only possible way to change the actual situation is to set up authentic workers' autonomies which would make the employees the real master of a factory. Our association demands a restoration of the autonomous nature of the co-operative. It is necessary to pass a new bill which will protect from administrative interference." This was passed by the National Deputies conference of Solidarity in 1981. Their current program is much less radical and very different than the original.



    The Polish Anarchist Federation



    The Anarchist Federation (Federacja Anarchistyczna) became active in the early 80's. Members of the FA include Anarcho-ecologists, Anarcho-feminists, anti-militarists, anti-clericalists & anti-capitalists. There is a section of the FA in almost every major (and many minor) cities in Poland. Congresses of the FA are held every 6 months, determining some guidelines for cooperation between groups from different cities, but in the end every group is free to do whatever it will.



    Demonstrations Against Police Violence - As aggressive capitalism has grown in our country, so has aggressive criminality & police violence. These things seem to be very tightly related. In the recent period, many people were shot & killed by bandits. At the same time, bandits in blue uniforms killed unarmed passers-by, or persons arrested without any apparent reason. Despite this fact, people have shown support for the police, and demanded to increase the rights of cops to use firearms. Ridiculous "Black Marches" were organized by populist politicians for this end.



    The Anarchist Federation (FA) thinks that the only way to fight crime is to organize self-defense groups in endangered neighborhoods. Experience has shown that the law, the police & the prisons only increase criminality. Any increase of the power of the biggest criminal organization - The State - will not reduce criminality.



    In reaction to this, the Anarchist Federation (FA) has organized "Blue Marches" in Warsaw & Rzeszow, recalling murders, rapes, rackets & other crimes committed by cops. Two "bodies" in black plastic were carried to the headquarters of the police in Warsaw, & candles were lit. Slogans like "The police will protect me from thieves, but who will protect me from the police" & "Dogs serve, wolves are free" ("dog" is used instead of "pig" in Polish) were shouted.



    Demonstrations Against Bourgeois Hypocrisy - "The Banquet" is organized every year by prominent capitalists & other scum who have power in Cracow, to show a spectacle of charity to the population. It's a pity the food served at these banquets costs ten times more than the funds raised for the poor! People wouldn't need to live on the scraps from the table of the wealthy if they didn't spend all their lives stealing from the poor.



    The Krakow section of the Anarchist Federation (FA) has picketed "The Banquet" regularity for several years, recalling all the scandals related to the careers of prominent guests (union-busting, stealing of public funds, exploitation of workers). Free food was served to homeless people, & Molotov cocktails were "served" to the police.



    Police repression was very severe. Riot cops & undercover agents were very violent, and a lot of people were arrested & charged with false accusations. Sadly, these repressions have been partly successful: many people from the Anarchist Federation - Krakow (FA-Krakow) can't be active because they are threatened with suspended sentences.



    Radical Anti-Fascist Action - The Radical Anti-Fascist Action (RAAF) was created as a response to Nazi-skinhead banditism. It's main goal is to protect people on punk/alternative concerts & Anarchist demonstrations against aggressive Fascists. RAAB also organized armed patrols, & disturbed some Fascist/Nationalist demonstrations. The main merit of RAAB is that people from the alternative/punk/Anarchist scene have stopped being afraid of Nazi-skinheads.



    Anarchist Black Cross - Poland - The Anarchist Black Cross - Poland (ABC) has until now worked on the following cases:

    Marek Milewski, arrested in February 1996, during a demonstration in Krakow (more info on that demonstration in "Demonstrations Against Bourgeois Hypocrisy") and has waited for a trial in jail for over a month. He was accused of throwing a Molotov cocktail at a policeman. Various sections of ABC-Poland organized demonstrations of support, wrote petitions, raised funds for the lawyers. After those demonstrations, he was released, while his trial continued. At the end of 96, he was found not guilty by the judge.

    Jacek Zbierajski, Tomek Czechowicz, arrested in August 1996 in Prague in the Czech Republic. They were accused of devastating a tram, which was not true. The Polish consulate was not interested in the case, & the accused were not allowed to see anyone. They were also forced to sign false testimonies. ABC-Warsaw organized a demonstration at the Polish Foreign Affairs Ministry, & the Czech Republic Embassy. Three days later, the two guys were released, & came back to Warsaw. Probably they will not come back to the Czech Republic to continue the trial.

    Tomasz Wilkoszewski, accused of murder of a Nazi-skinhead in Radomsko. He was sentenced on February 20, 1997 for 15 years of prison. Although it may be true that the fascist died by his hand, but the charges of conspired murder are unjust, & the sentence much higher than murderers usually get (there was a case of a Nazi who got 3 years for killing an Anarchist--what's more, the sentence has been suspended). Also, the history of the conflict has to be taken into account. The accused & his friends were regularity threatened, beaten up & injured for many years by Nazis living in their neighborhood. One of the Anarchists almost had his eye stabbed out. All this makes it a case of self-defense. ABC is convinced that the use of violence in self-defense is more acceptable than police oppression & imprisonment. This case still has to be worked out.



    Initiative For The General Boycott of Chinese Products - The Initiative For The General Boycott of Chinese Products is not a strictly Anarchist one (This is why this name was invented - we don't sign it as the Anarchist Federation (FA)) & is meant to make people conscious of the existence of forced labor camps (Laogai) in China. People should be aware that the money they bought a toy with, is used to finance torture chambers. We also point out that capitalist corporations are participating in this mass murder.



    So far, the Initiative has made several demonstrations & happenings at the Chinese embassy in Warsaw & at the commercial center, similar demonstrations were made in Poznan, Krakow & other cities. The Initiative is also interested in the case of a Chinese marriage, the Manduquechi, which are threatened with extradition to China where they may face the death penalty. Petitions are sent to the ministry of justice, & demonstrations will be made.



    We chose not to act as the FA to make cooperation with the press & official institutions like Amnesty International, Helsinki Foundation, & the Circle of Friends of Tibet easier, and so that the FA is not associated with politicians of any kind.



    Notes



    • In the Russian-dominated part of Poland, however, a number of Polish Anarchists did participate in the wider revolutionary struggle.


    • Jaroslav Dombrowski (1838-1871) also took an active part in the Polish uprising of 1863. He was arrested for complicity in the uprising in 1864 & was imprisoned in Moscow. Receiving help from Russian revolutionaries, he escaped in broad daylight, dressed as a woman. He was hidden for a while in St. Petersburg before leaving the country, for exile in Paris, where he was killed as a Communard in 1871.


    There are also reports of one Anarchist group in Warsaw in 1844, which had as its organizers a number of magistrates! While information about this group is scanty, from what is known it seems likely that it was an organization composed of people with links with the Russian Social Revolutionaries, & one or two were followers of Peter Lavriv, and not Anarchists at all.



    • A mass strike--General Strike.


    • Ironically recent reports indicate that a special detention camp has been built at Bialystok, to imprison those workers that were convicted following the riots in Poland during June.


    • Polish Anarchists have been truly international: Dombrowski was not the only Pole to fight at the barricades of the Paris Commune of 1871. Walery Wroblesky escaped death there, returning to take an active part in the struggle in Krakow. Others were active in North & South America--Simón Radowitzky, for example, who blew up the Buenos Aires Chief of Police in 1902.


    Many were active in exile: Walery Mroczowski was a member of the Bakininist Alliance of Social Democracy.



    In London, one of the four Anarchist clubs in existence at the end of the 19th Century was frequented mainly by Russian & Polish exiles, & for a time an Anarchist paper, printed in Yiddish was circulated among Polish workers in the tailoring industry in East London.



    One historian even mentions the arrest of a Polish Anarchist in Andalusia during the so-called "Black Hand" affair. However, he quotes her name as "Sofia Pereskania" which is not Polish (Russian?), & it could have been an incredible attempt by the Spanish authorities to discredit (?) local Anarchist groups by associating them with Sofia Pereskania, the courageous Russian woman who assassinated the Tsar during the same period.



    • 'Anarchist-communists' were inspired of the writings of Peter Kropotkin who advocated a "Free Socialism" ("Anarchism") patterned after the economics of the Paris Commune of 1879.


    Download

    Polish Anarchist Contacts



    Gdansk:
    Ruch Spoleczenstwa Alternatywnego (RSA)
    c/o: Jany Waluszko
    ul. Stare Domki 6/9
    80-857 Gdansk 1.
    e-mail: pomierz@ole.most.org.pl

    Katowice:
    "An Arche"
    P.O. Box 636
    40-958 Katowice 2.
    e-mail: sierp@eternal.net



    Krakow:
    FA-Krakow
    c/o: Rafal Gorski
    ul. Gontyna ½
    30-203 Krakow.
    e-mail:
    bojanowski@softlab.ii.uj.edu.pl
    zb@zb.most.org.pl

    Lodz:
    Centrum Inicjatywy Lokalnej
    P.O. Box 40
    90-965 Lodz.
    e-mail: czsz@polbox.com

    Poznan:
    Kolektyw "Rozbrat"
    P.O. Box 5
    61-966 Poznan 31.
    e-mail: rozbrat@friko2.onet.pl
    This is the contact point for Anarchist Black Cross - Poland

    Slupsk:
    Kolektyw "Aktywnosc Spoleczna"
    P.O. Box 65
    76-215 Slupsk 12.
    fax: (0-59) 42-23-62
    e-mail: bifa@polbox.com
    This is the general contact point for the Polish Anarchist Federation

    Sopot:
    "Mac Pariadka"
    P.O. Box 67
    81-806 Sopot 6.
    e-mail: dream@dreamfactory.com.pl

    Warszawa:
    FA-Warszawa
    c/o: Artur Borkowski
    P.O. Box 217
    00-950 Warszawa 1.
    e-mail: gawlik@plearn.edu.pl

    Wroclaw:
    FA-Wroclaw
    P.O. Box 125
    54-433 Wroclaw 60.
    e-mail: s91559@math.uni.wroc.pl






    9002 -- CALENDARS

    http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_22


    http://english.yasuda-u.ac.jp/lc/modules.php?op=modload&name=NS-Ephemera&file=index&func=Ephemeridsshow

    http://ytak.club.fr/
    http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/heinakuu.htm

    9002 --

    After being withheld from circulation for 17 years, all six of Guy Debord's films were screened at the 2001 Venice Film Festival & it was announced that they would all be made generally available again in spring 2002. The opening is now scheduled for April 9-11 in Paris.

    Ken Knabb has been asked by Alice Debord to make a new English translation of Debord's complete filmscripts. This translation will be used for subtitling, & will also be published in book form. If all goes well it is likely that subtitled versions of all the films will be available within the next year or so.

    Meanwhile, you can find out more about Debord's films at:

    http://www.bopsecrets.org/SI/films.htm (soundtracks of two of the shorter films)

    http://www.bopsecrets.org/PS/Debordfilm.htm (on his film adaptation of his book "The Society of the Spectacle")

    http://www.bopsecrets.org/SI/bibliog.htm (filmography & latest news)

    http://www.signsofprotest.org/



    ?
    9002 --
    ?

    http://www.hermes-press.com/brainwash1.htm


    ?
    9002 --

    Seattle, KUOW-FM 94.9 The Writer's Almanac is produced by Minnesota Public Radio & distributed to radio audiences by Public Radio International

    Not done July 25?, 26 27, skipped all of august, sept 1-6
    http://almanac.mpr.org/docs/99_07_19.htm




    Illustration: Choose Wild Cool Anger tobacco
    9002 -- wild anger



    Illustration: Person being squished by thumb
    9002 -- squish



    Illustration: Person being squished by thumb
    9002 -- time bomb



    Ginsberg in America cover
    9002 -- allen ginsberg America small



    9002 -- TO DO 1132 3211 http://recollectionbooks.com/bleed/3211.htm



    9002 -- "takver_oz" Reply-To: anarchy_history@yahoogroups.com To: anarchy_history@yahoogroups.com History of Anarchism in Sydney, Australia: John Englart continues the story of Anarchism in Sydney in documenting the split in the Jura Books Collective during 1982 http://www.takver.com/history/sydney/syd82split.htm then details Anarchism in Sydney 1982-2002, the story of the two anarchist bookshops, Jura Books & Black Rose. In 2002 Jura Books will celebrate 25 years of activity & Black Rose will celebrate 20 years. http://www.takver.com/history/sydney/syd8202.htm In Rebel Worker & Accountability John Englart examines the 20 year history of Rebel Worker, initially the paper of the Australian IWW, then of the Anarcho-Syndicalist Federation, & presently of the Anarcho-Syndicalist Network. http://www.takver.com/history/sydney/rebelworker.htm The above articles are a personal account, that reveal some of the personal social dynamics amoung some of the anarchists in Sydney. The debates & discussions are important for identifying problems and learning from the failures & mistakes. These articles follow on from John's Anarchism in Sydney 1975-1981, which was published in Freedom Magazine (UK) in 1982. http://www.takver.com/history/sydney/syd7581.htm New in the biography section: Richard Curlewis, a life long advocate for workers' control, a Communist Party member, Anarcho-Syndicalist Federation member, & member of the IWW. Died 16th March 2002. http://www.takver.com/history/melb/curlewis_r.htm New on the anarchist gatherings site: a report of the 1999 anarcho-syndicalist conference in Melbourne http://www.takver.com/history/meetings/c1999mel.htm -- with solidarity Takver Radical Tradition, an anarchist & radical Australasian History Page http://www.takver.com/history/index.htm


    9003 --
    Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Wilson, Lanford
    Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Wisconsin
    Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - World War II
    Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - XY Publishing
    Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Youth
    Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Zabawa, Bruce M.
    Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Zambia
    Sexual Freedom - Gay Liberation - Zimbabwe
    Sexual Freedom - Genital Mutilation
    Sexual Freedom - ICSE
    Sexual Freedom - Incest
    Sexual Freedom - Indiana University Institute for Sex Research
    Sexual Freedom - Institute for the Study of Human Resources
    Sexual Freedom - Janus Society
    Sexual Freedom - Janus South
    Sexual Freedom - Ladies Against Women
    Sexual Freedom - Leather
    Sexual Freedom - Loving Alternatives
    Sexual Freedom - Masturbation
    Sexual Freedom - Men's Liberation
    Sexual Freedom - Men's Liberation - Androgyny
    Sexual Freedom - Men's Liberation - Men Against Rape Culture
    Sexual Freedom - Men's Liberation - National Organization of Changing Men
    Sexual Freedom - Michigan - Michigan Sexological Center
    Sexual Freedom - New Left
    Sexual Freedom - New York City League for Sexual Freedom
    Sexual Freedom - Paedophilia    (1 of 2)
    Sexual Freedom - Paedophilia    (2 of 2)
    Sexual Freedom - Paedophilia - Dodson, Chuck
    Sexual Freedom - Paedophilia - Global Academic Publishers
    Sexual Freedom - Paedophilia - Paedophile Information Exchange  (1 of 4)
    Sexual Freedom - Paedophilia - Paedophile Information Exchange  (2 of 4)
    Sexual Freedom - Paedophilia - Paedophile Information Exchange  (3 of 4)
    Sexual Freedom - Paedophilia - Paedophile Information Exchange  (4 of 4)
    Sexual Freedom - Poetry
    Sexual Freedom - Political Activities
    Sexual Freedom - Polyandry
    Sexual Freedom - Pornography - Heterosexuality
    Sexual Freedom - Prostitution
    Sexual Freedom - Prostitution - COYOTE
    Sexual Freedom - Psychedelic Venus Church
    Sexual Freedom - Public Sex
    Sexual Freedom - Rene Guyon Society
    Sexual Freedom - Rimmer, Robert H.
    Sexual Freedom - Sadomasochism
    Sexual Freedom - Safe P Products
    Sexual Freedom - Sexual Freedom League
    Sexual Freedom - Sexual Freedom League of Michigan
    Sexual Freedom - Sexual Freedom League of Michigan - Detroit Chapter
    Sexual Freedom - Sodomy Laws
    Sexual Freedom - Statutory Rape
    Sexual Freedom - Swingers
    Sexual Freedom - Tatelbaum, Brenda Loew
    Sexual Freedom - The Sexual Emancipation Movement (SEM)
    Sexual Freedom - Transexualism
    Sexual Freedom - Transexualism - Jorgensen, Christine
    Sexual Freedom - Transvestitism
    Sexual Freedom - Washington - Seattle Sexual Freedom League
    Sexual Freedom - West, Mae
    Sexual Harassment
    Seychelles
    Shaman Drum (bookstore)
    Silver
    Sinatra, Frank
    Sinclair, John
    Single Tax - American Free Soil Society
    Single Tax - Anti-Single Tax
    Single Tax - Brokaw, Warren Edwin
    Single Tax - California Single Tax League
    Single Tax - George, Henry
    Single Tax - Great Britain
    Single Tax - Robert Schalkenbach Foundation
    Single Tax - Single Tax Library
    Single Tax - Single Tax News
    Single Tax - The Equitist (Reprints)
    Single Tax
    Skeptics Society
    Skinheads
    Skinheads - Music
    Slavery
    Slienger, Carl
    Small Press Books
    Smedley, Agnes
    Smith, Louise Pettibone
    Socialism - Africa - Black Seeds
    Socialism - Anti-Socialism
    Socialism - Archives - Archief en Museum van de Socialistische Arbeidersbeweging V.Z.W.
    Socialism - Archives - Fondazione di Studi Storici "Filippo Turati"
    Socialism - Archives - Tidsskriftcentret
    Socialism - Australia
    Socialism - Australia - Australia Asia Worker Links
    Socialism - Australia - Libertarian Socialist Organization
    Socialism - Australia - Socialist Labor Party of Australia
    Socialism - Australia - Sparticist
    Socialism - Belgium
    Socialism - Bibliography
    Socialism - Canada
    Socialism - Canada - Bethune, Dr. Norman
    Socialism - Canada - Co-operative Commonwealth Federation
    Socialism - Canada - International Socialists
    Socialism - Canada - Ontario
    Socialism - Canada - Progressive Workers Movement
    Socialism - Canada - Social Science Research
    Socialism - Canada - Toronto Center for Marxist Studies
    Socialism - Caribbean - Groupe Revolution Socialiste
    Socialism - Ceylon
    Socialism - China
    Socialism - Criticism/Self Criticism
    Socialism - Equador
    Socialism - Fourth International
    Socialism - Fourth International - Posadas, Jaime
    Socialism - Fourth International - Posadist Fourth International
    Socialism - France
    Socialism - France - Centre d'Etudes sur les Mouvements Trotskyste et Révolutionnaires Internationaux
    Socialism - France - Groupe Communiste Internationale
    Socialism - France - Groupe Quatrième Internationale Section Algérienne
    Socialism - France - Ligue Communiste Révolutionnaire
    Socialism - France - Paris Commune
    Socialism - France - Parti Communiste Révolutionnaire (Troskyste)
    Socialism - France - Parti Ouvrier Révolutionnaire (Troskyste)
    Socialism - France - Socialisme ou Barbarie
    Socialism - France - Spartacus
    Socialism - Germany
    Socialism - Germany - Campaign Against the Model West Germany
    Socialism - Germany - Gruppe Revolutionärer Kommunisten
    Socialism - Germany - Liebknecht, Karl
    Socialism - Germany - Luxemberg, Rosa
    Socialism - Germany - Marx, Karl
    Socialism - Germany - Red Army Faction
    Socialism - Germany - Schweitzer, Johann Baptist von
    Socialism - Germany - Simplicissimus
    Socialism - Germany - Spartakist Workers Party of Germany
    Socialism - Germany - Spartakusbund
    Socialism - Germany - Trotzkistische Liga Deutschlands
    Socialism - Germany - Utas, I. L.
    Socialism - Great Britain
    Socialism - Great Britain - Benn, Tony
    Socialism - Great Britain - Brockway, Fenner
    Socialism - Great Britain - Fabian Society
    Socialism - Great Britain - International Bolshevik Tendency
    Socialism - Great Britain - International Marxist Group
    Socialism - Great Britain - labor Party
    Socialism - Great Britain - Marx House Restoration Fund
    Socialism - Great Britain - Marx Memorial Library
    Socialism - Great Britain - Miliband, Ralph
    Socialism - Great Britain - Morris, William
    Socialism - Great Britain - Nexus
    Socialism - Great Britain - Orwell, George
    Socialism - Great Britain - Owen, Robert Dale
    Socialism - Great Britain - Peoples' News Service
    Socialism - Great Britain - Periodicals - Bibliography
    Socialism - Great Britain - Redwords
    Socialism - Great Britain - Revolutionary Communist Group
    Socialism - Great Britain - Revolutionary Workers Party (IV)
    Socialism - Great Britain - Ruskin, John
    Socialism - Great Britain - Shaw, George Bernard
    Socialism - Great Britain - Socialist labor League
    Socialism - Great Britain - Socialist Party of Great Britain
    Socialism - Great Britain - Socialist Workers Party
    Socialism - Great Britain - Sparticist League/Britain
    Socialism - Greece
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    Socialism - History
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    Socialism - Ireland
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    Socialism - Italy - Centro Ligure di Storia Sociale
    Socialism - Italy - Matteotti, Giacomo
    Socialism - Italy - Partito Communista Rivoluzionario
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    Socialism - Jamaica -Revolutionary Marxist League
    Socialism - L'Internationale (Song)
    Socialism - May Day
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    Socialism - Miscellaneous
    Socialism - New Zealand
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    Socialism - Peru
    Socialism - Poetry
    Socialism - Russia
    Socialism - Russia - Bresko Breshkovskaia Ekaterina
    Socialism - Russia - Social Revolutionary Party
    Socialism - Second International
    Socialism - Southern Yemen
    Socialism - Spain
    Socialism - Spain - Internacional Revolucion della Juventud - Jovan Guardia Internacional
    Socialism - Spain - Internacional Revolucion della Juventud - Juventudes Revolucionarias de Espana
    Socialism - Sri Lanka
    Socialism - Theory
    Socialism - U.S.
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    Socialism - U.S. - Adamic, Louis
    Socialism - U.S. - Advocators
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    Socialism - U.S. - All Peoples Congress - Michigan - Detroit, October 16-18, 1981
    Socialism - U.S. - American Communist Workers' Movement (Marxist-Leninist)
    Socialism - U.S. - American Labor Party
    Socialism - U.S. - American Workers Party, circa 1934
    Socialism - U.S. - Appeal to Reason
    Socialism - U.S. - Authors
    Socialism - U.S. - Ayers, Richard
    Socialism - U.S. - Bay Area Research Collective
    Socialism - U.S. - Bay Area Socialist Organizing Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Bay Area Spartacist League
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    Socialism - U.S. - Beals, May
    Socialism - U.S. - Benson, Allan L.
    Socialism - U.S. - Berger, Victor
    Socialism - U.S. - Bibliography
    Socialism - U.S. - Boggs, James & Grace Lee
    Socialism - U.S. - Bourne, Randolph
    Socialism - U.S. - Bray, John Francis
    Socialism - U.S. - Brisbane, Albert
    Socialism - U.S. - Bryant, Louise
    Socialism - U.S. - Buhle, Mary Jo
    Socialism - U.S. - California
    Socialism - U.S. - Calverton, Victor Francis
    Socialism - U.S. - Campaign for Peace & Democracy
    Socialism - U.S. - Cannon, James P.
    Socialism - U.S. - Cartoons
    Socialism - U.S. - Center for Icarian Studies
    Socialism - U.S. - Center for Radical Research
    Socialism - U.S. - Center for Socialist History
    Socialism - U.S. - Chavannes, Albert
    Socialism - U.S. - Chomsky, Noam
    Socialism - U.S. - Chomsky, Noam - Ann Arbor
    Socialism - U.S. - Christian Socialism
    Socialism - U.S. - Citizen's Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Clevans, Mark (see: Maratchney, Mark)
    Socialism - U.S. - Cockburn, Alexander
    Socialism - U.S. - Cohen, Joseph E.
    Socialism - U.S. - Committee Against Racism & Apartheid
    Socialism - U.S. - Committee for Independent Political Action
    Socialism - U.S. - Committee for Jobs or Income Now
    Socialism - U.S. - Committee for Non-Violent Revolution
    Socialism - U.S. - Committee for Revolutionary Unity
    Socialism - U.S. - Communist Labor League
    Socialism - U.S. - Communist Labor Party of the USA
    Socialism - U.S. - Communist Party of the USA/Marxist-Leninists
    Socialism - U.S. - Communist Workers Party - Greensboro
    Socialism - U.S. - Communist Workers Party - NASSCO Workers
    Socialism - U.S. - Communist Youth Organization
    Socialism - U.S. - Conference on Socialism & Activism
    Socialism - U.S. - Conferences
    Socialism - U.S. - Council of Workers, Soldiers & Sailors
    Socialism - U.S. - Cromwell, M.
    Socialism - U.S. - Curtis, Mark
    Socialism - U.S. - Debs, Eugene
    Socialism - U.S. - Debs, Eugene - Eugene V. Debs Foundation
    Socialism - U.S. - Democratic Socialists of America
    Socialism - U.S. - Democratic Socialists of America - Michigan - Ann Arbor
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    Socialism - U.S. - Dietzgen, Eugene
    Socialism - U.S. - Directories
    Socialism - U.S. - Draper, Hal
    Socialism - U.S. - Eastman, Max
    Socialism - U.S. - Ebert, Justus
    Socialism - U.S. - Egelsom, Nick
    Socialism - U.S. - Farrell, James T.
    Socialism - U.S. - Federate Socialists Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Feingold, Carl
    Socialism - U.S. - Felix, David
    Socialism - U.S. - Ferry, Elinor
    Socialism - U.S. - For Ourselves
    Socialism - U.S. - Fourierism
    Socialism - U.S. - Fourth International
    Socialism - U.S. - Fourth Internationalist Tendency
    Socialism - U.S. - Fraina, Louis C.
    Socialism - U.S. - Fraser, Clara
    Socialism - U.S. - Genovese, Eugene D.
    Socialism - U.S. - George Jackson Brigade
    Socialism - U.S. - Greif, Ed
    Socialism - U.S. - Guardian
    Socialism - U.S. - Haber, Alan
    Socialism - U.S. - Hagerty, Thomas J. (Father)
    Socialism - U.S. - Haldeman-Julius, Emanuel
    Socialism - U.S. - Hammer & Steel
    Socialism - U.S. - Hansen, Joseph
    Socialism - U.S. - Harrington, Michael
    Socialism - U.S. - Hillquit, Morris
    Socialism - U.S. - History & Theory
    Socialism - U.S. - Hook, Sidney
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    Socialism - U.S. - Illinois - Chicago Left Wing
    Socialism - U.S. - In These Times
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    Socialism - U.S. - Institute for Democratic Socialism
    Socialism - U.S. - International Brotherhood Welfare Association
    Socialism - U.S. - International Network Against New State Repression
    Socialism - U.S. - International Socialist Organization (ISO)
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    Socialism - U.S. - Iowa
    Socialism - U.S. - James, Cyril Lionel Richard
    Socialism - U.S. - Kansas
    Socialism - U.S. - Kerr, Charles E. Co.
    Socialism - U.S. - Khan, Tom
    Socialism - U.S. - Labor Party (U.S., 1996-
    Socialism - U.S. - Lash, Joseph P.
    Socialism - U.S. - League for Economic Democracy
    Socialism - U.S. - League for Industrial Democracy
    Socialism - U.S. - League for Industrial Democracy - Students for a Democratic Society
    Socialism - U.S. - League for Industrial Democracy - Students' League for
    Socialism - U.S. - League for Socialist Reconstruction
    Socialism - U.S. - League for the Revolutionary Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Leninist Core to Found the U.S. Bolshevik Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Lewis, Marx
    Socialism - U.S. - Liberator (Magazine, 1918-1924)
    Socialism - U.S. - Libertarian Socialists League
    Socialism - U.S. - Line of March
    Socialism - U.S. - Lloyd, Henry Demerest
    Socialism - U.S. - Lockwood, G.H. & Mrs.
    Socialism - U.S. - London, Jack
    Socialism - U.S. - Mage, Shane
    Socialism - U.S. - Maoist International Movement
    Socialism - U.S. - Marcy, Mary E.
    Socialism - U.S. - Marxist-Leninist Organizing Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Marxist-Leninist Party, USA
    Socialism - U.S. - Marxists-Leninist Party, USA - Michigan - Detroit Branch
    Socialism - U.S. - McDonald, A.J..
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Bohn, William E.
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Contemporary History Project
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Human Rights Project
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Marxist Discussion Group
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Marxist Group
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Marxist Theory Study Group
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor - U-M Democratic Socialist Club
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor - U-M Network for Cultural Democracy
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Ann Arbor  - Ann Arbor Revolution-Evolution
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Detroit
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Detroit - Detroit Aid & Defense Fund
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Detroit - Detroit Left Unity Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Detroit - Detroit Marxist Leninist Study Group
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Detroit - Detroit Socialist Summer School
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Detroit - Goodman, Ernest
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Dollinger, Genora Johnson
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Facing Reality Publishing Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Gamble, Eliza Burt
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Michigan Socialist Society
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Miller, William Z.
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Moore, Michael
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - National Rally Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Socialist Tract Association
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Solidarity
    Socialism - U.S. - Michigan - Wald, Alan
    Socialism - U.S. - Minnesota
    Socialism - U.S. - Mississippi
    Socialism - U.S. - Monthly Review
    Socialism - U.S. - Movement for a New Society
    Socialism - U.S. - National Anti-Imperialist League
    Socialism - U.S. - National Caucus of Labor Committees
    Socialism - U.S. - National Coalition for Social Change
    Socialism - U.S. - National Conference for New Politics
    Socialism - U.S. - National Conference of Labor Socialist & Radical Movements
    Socialism - U.S. - National Organization for an American Revolution
    Socialism - U.S. - National Organizing Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Nationalism
    Socialism - U.S. - Nelson, Truman
    Socialism - U.S. - New Alliance Party
    Socialism - U.S. - New America (1930's)
    Socialism - U.S. - New American Movement
    Socialism - U.S. - New American Movement - Ann Arbor
    Socialism - U.S. - New Dawn
    Socialism - U.S. - New Options
    Socialism - U.S. - New Politics Party
    Socialism - U.S. - New Union Party
    Socialism - U.S. - New Voice
    Socialism - U.S. - New World Libertarian Front
    Socialism - U.S. - New York
    Socialism - U.S. - News & Letters
    Socialism - U.S. - North Star Network
    Socialism - U.S. - Novack, George
    Socialism - U.S. - Oglesby, Carl
    Socialism - U.S. - O'Hare, Kate Richards
    Socialism - U.S. - Organization for a Marxist-Leninist Workers' Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Owen, Robert
    Socialism - U.S. - P.R. Club, Communist Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Partisan Review
    Socialism - U.S. - Party for Workers Power
    Socialism - U.S. - Peoples Alliance
    Socialism - U.S. - Peoples Bicentennial Commission
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    Socialism - U.S. - People's Information Relay
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    Socialism - U.S. - Peoples Tribune
    Socialism - U.S. - Philadelphia Workers Organizing Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Prairie Fire Organizing Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Progressive Labor Movement
    Socialism - U.S. - Progressive Labor Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Proletarian Party of America
    Socialism - U.S. - Proletarian Unity League
    Socialism - U.S. - Prometheus Research Library
    Socialism - U.S. - Puddington, Arch
    Socialism - U.S. - Rainbow Lobby
    Socialism - U.S. - Ramparts
    Socialism - U.S. - Rand School
    Socialism - U.S. - RECON
    Socialism - U.S. - Red Coyote Tribe
    Socialism - U.S. - Research Group I
    Socialism - U.S. - Research Group on Socialism & Democracy
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Anti-Imperialist League
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Communist League
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Communist Party - Avakian, Bob
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Communist Party U.S.A
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Communist Youth Brigade
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Marxist Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Party Tendency
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Socialist League
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Student Brigade
    Socialism - U.S. - Revolutionary Workers' League
    Socialism - U.S. - Rise, William Frederich
    Socialism - U.S. - Rosenberg Fund for Children
    Socialism - U.S. - Sanders, Bernard
    Socialism - U.S. - Science for the People
    Socialism - U.S. - Shachtman, Max
    Socialism - U.S. - Sinclair, Louis
    Socialism - U.S. - Sinclair, Upton
    Socialism - U.S. - Social Democratic Federation of New York
    Socialism - U.S. - Social Democrats - Young Peoples Socialist League
    Socialism - U.S. - Social Democrats, U.S.A.
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Appeal - Official Weekly - Organ of the Socialist Workers Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Committee of Correspondence
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Commonwealth, U.S.
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Equality Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Forum
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Labor Party
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    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Labor Party - Averring, Edward
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    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Labor Party - Leaflets     (1 of 3)
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Labor Party - Leaflets     (2 of 3)
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    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Labor Party - National Executive Committee
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    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Labor Party - New York
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    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Labor Party - Platforms
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Labor Party - Press Security League
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Organizer
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party      (1 of 2)
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party      (2 of 2)
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Anti-War
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Bibliography
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Call Association
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Debs, Eugene V.
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Democratic Socialist for Farber
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Elections
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Michigan
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Michigan - Ann Arbor
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Michigan - Detroit
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - National Action Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - National Committees
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - National Convention, 1964
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - National Conventions
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Nearing, Scott
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Negroes
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - New America
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - New York
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Official Records
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Socialist Review
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Socialist Scholars Conference
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Thomas, Norman
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Tracts - Organizational Leaflets
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - USA
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Party - Young People's Socialist League
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Elections
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Georgia - Lockheed Workers
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Michigan
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Michigan - Friday Night Socialist Forum, 1960-1961
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Michigan - Friday Night Socialist Forum, 1962
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Michigan - Friday Night Socialist Forum, 1963
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Michigan - Friday Night Socialist Forum, 1964
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Michigan - Friday Night Socialist Forum, 1965-1969 (1 of 2)
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Michigan - Friday Night Socialist Forum, 1965-1969 (2 of 2)
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Michigan - Friday Night Socialist Forum/Militant Forum, 1970
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Michigan - The Military Forum
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Minnesota
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - New York - Brooklyn Navy Yard Workers
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Political Rights Defense Fund
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Socialist Candidates in 1968
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Speakers for Radical Change
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Young Peoples Socialist League
    Socialism - U.S. - Socialist Workers Party - Young Socialist Alliance
    Socialism - U.S. - Sojourner Truth Organization
    Socialism - U.S. - Songs
    Socialism - U.S. - Source
    Socialism - U.S. - Southend Press
    Socialism - U.S. - SPARK
    Socialism - U.S. - Spartacus
    Socialism - U.S. - Spartacus Youth League
    Socialism - U.S. - Sparticist
    Socialism - U.S. - Sparticist League - Michigan - Detroit
    Socialism - U.S. - Stone, I.F.
    Socialism - U.S. - Swift, Morrison I.
    Socialism - U.S. - Teachers for a Democratic Culture
    Socialism - U.S. - Texas
    Socialism - U.S. - The Second National Social & Political Conference, Detroit, 1901
    Socialism - U.S. - Tichenor, Henry M.
    Socialism - U.S. - Trusts & Big Business
    Socialism - U.S. - Tucson Marxist-Leninist Collective
    Socialism - U.S. - Union Labor Party
    Socialism - U.S. - United Labor Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Van Heijeoort, Jean
    Socialism - U.S. - Vincent, Henry
    Socialism - U.S. - Warren, Fred D.
    Socialism - U.S. - Wayland, J.A.
    Socialism - U.S. - Weather Underground
    Socialism - U.S. - Weather Underground - Oughton, Diana
    Socialism - U.S. - Weather Underground - Saxe, Susan
    Socialism - U.S. - Weissman, George
    Socialism - U.S. - Weschler, Nancy
    Socialism - U.S. - Wilshire, Gaylord
    Socialism - U.S. - Wisconsin - Madison
    Socialism - U.S. - Wohlforth, Jim
    Socialism - U.S. - Women
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers Action Committee
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers Communist League
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers Council
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers' Defense Union
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers International Relief
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers League
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers Party, 1934-1936
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers Party, 1940-1949
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers Power
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers World Party
    Socialism - U.S. - Workers World Party - Marcy, Sam
    Socialism - U.S. - Workingmen's Party of the United States
    Socialism - U.S. - Wright, Francis
    Socialism - U.S. - Young Marxist Humanists
    Socialism - U.S. - Young Workers League
    Socialism - U.S. - Young, Art
    Socialism - U.S. - Young, Art - Cartoons
    Socialism - U.S. - Youth Against War & Fascism
    Socialism - U.S. - Z Institute for Social & Cultural Change
    Socialism -Venezuela
    Socialist Relief Society
    Socialistic Congress, Pittsburgh, 1883
    Society for French American Affairs
    Solanis, Valerie
    The Something Else Press Incorporated
    Southern California Library for Social Studies & Research
    Southern States Bibliography
    Sovereigns of Industry
    Spain
    Spain -  CNT-FAI
    Spain - Ajut Infantil de Reraguarda
    Spain - Anarchists
    Spain - Association International Des Travailleurs
    Spain - Bibliography
    Spain - Civil War -  Commemorations
    Spain - Civil War - Editorial Marxista
    Spain - Civil War - Grupo Acrata
    Spain - Civil War - Hemmingway, Ernest
    Spain - Civil War - History
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    Spain - Civil War - International Brigade Songs
    Spain - Civil War - International Brigades
    Spain - Civil War - International Brigades - Abraham Lincoln Brigade Archives
    Spain - Civil War - IWW
    Spain - Civil War - Modotti, Tina
    Spain - Civil War - Opinion in the U.S. - Aid to Republicans
    Spain - Civil War - Postcards
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    Spain - Civil War - Solidaridad Internacional Antifascista (S.I.A.)
    Spain - Civil War - Women
    Spain - Communism
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    Spain - Confederacion Nacional del Trabajo de Espana en Mexico - AIT..: Comision pro Liberacion de Espana
    Spain - Documentos de la Revolucion Espanola
    Spain - Durruti, Buenaventura
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    Spain - Neafus, Ralph
    Spain - Partido Obrero de Unificacion Marxista
    Spain - Periodicals - Bibliography - Labadie
    Spain - Political Persecutions, 1897
    Spain - Political Prisoners
    Spain - Provisional Labor Committee for Workers' Rights in Spain
    Spain - Puig i Antich, Salvador
    Spain - Refugees
    Spain - Refugees - Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee
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    Spain - Refugees - Spanish Refugee Aid, Inc.    (2 of 2)
    Spain - Republican Government - Official Records
    Spain - Solidaridad Internacional Antifascista
    Spain - Sources
    Spain - Spanish Refugee Aid, Inc.       (1 of 2)
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    Spender, Stephen
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    Steindler, Gary - Acent Posters
    Stelle Group
    Stowe, Lyman
    Straight Edge Industrial Settlement
    Street People's Alliance - Ann Arbor
    Strong, Anna Louise
    Structuralism
    Stuart, H.J. (see: The Equitist)
    Student League for Industrial Democracy (See: League for Industrial Democracy - Students League)
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    Survival International
    Swain, Dwight
    Synanon
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    Task Force for Democracy
    Taylor, I. Paul
    Taxation
    Tchaikovsky, Piotr Ilych
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    Technology - Anti-Technology - Unabomber
    Television
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    Television - National Empowerment Television
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    Terrorism
    Terrorism - Handbooks
    Terzani Defense Committee
    Thatcher, Margaret
    Theatre
    Theatre - Dramatic Arts Center
    Theatre - Federal Theatre Project
    Theatre - Performance Network
    Theatre - Yiddish Theatre
    Theatre, Black
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    Theatre, Radical
    Theatre, Radical - Back Alley Players
    Theatre, Radical - Bread & Puppet Theater
    Theatre, Radical - Hair
    Theatre, Radical - Provisional Theatre
    Theatre, Radical - Vasser Experimental Theatre
    Thompson, Virgil
    Tibet
    Tolstoy Foundation
    Torture
    Totalitarianism
    Townsend Plan
    Trade Union Educational League
    Trade Union Unity Convention
    Trade Union Unity League
    Trevellick, Richard F.
    Trevellick, Richard F. - Bibliography
    Trinidad & Tobago
    Truman, Harry S.
    Trusts
    Truth Missions
    Tubbs,  Bill (W.P.) (see: Fellowship of Freedom)
    Turkey
    Twain, Mark
    U.S. Civil Intelligence Agency
    U.S. Congress Against War
    U.S. President - Memorial . . . Regarding . . . The Abolition of the Presidency
    Underground Press       (1 of 2)
    Underground Press       (2 of 2)
    Underground Press - Agenda
    Underground Press - Alternative Media Information Center
    Underground Press - Alternative Press Center
    Underground Press - Alternative Press Index
    Underground Press - Amerikan Press Syndicate
    Underground Press - Ann Arbor Argus
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    Underground Press - Temple University - Contemporary Culture Center
    Underground Press - The Communication Company
    Underground Press - Underground Press Collections (University Microfilms International)
    Underground Press - Underground Press Conference
    Underground Press - Zines
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    Unemployed - Unemployed Councils of U.S. (Hunger March, 1931)
    Unemployed - Unemployed League of Detroit
    Unemployed - Unemployed Leagues - Hoih Unemployed League - Songs
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    Van Kleeck, Mary
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    Vocations for Social Change
    Vonnegut, Kurt
    Vorse, Mary Heaton
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    Wagner, A.G. (see: Fellowship of Freedom)
    Wales
    War on Want
    Warhol, Andy
    Warthan, Red
    Warwick  University (England)  - Centre for the Study of Social History
    Washington, Harold
    Watson, Tom
    Waudby, William S.
    Weber, Edward C.        (1 of 2)
    Weber, Edward C.        (2 of 2)
    Weinberger, Harry
    Welfare
    Wells, Charles A.
    Western Review Institute
    Western World Press
    White, Minor
    Whiteman, Lulu
    Wilcox, Laird
    Wild Irons Eight Hour Pioneer Association
    Willard, Frances
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    Winter, William
    Wisconsin State Historical Society
    Wisconsin University Labor Library
    Witkop, Amalia, Fannie, Pauly, & Rose
    Wittke, Carl - Works, General (see also: Heinzen-Pams & Books)
    Wolfe, Burton H.
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    Women - Organizations - NOW
    Women - Organizations - NOW - Michigan
    Women - Organizations - Organization for Equal Education of the Sexes
    Women - Organizations - Radical Women   (1 of 2)
    Women - Organizations - Radical Women   (2 of 2)
    Women - Organizations - Revolutionary Club of Women
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    Wood, J.H.
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    Woodcock, Raymond L.
    Woods, Shakey Jake
    Workers Against Concessions Party
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    World War I
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    Youth & Student Protest - California - University of California       (1 of 2)
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    Youth & Student Protest - California - University of California - Berkeley - Free Speech Movement
    Youth & Student Protest - California - University of California - Berkeley - Third World Liberation Front
    Youth & Student Protest - Chicago 8   (1 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Chicago 8   (2 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Columbia University
    Youth & Student Protest - Cornell University
    Youth & Student Protest - Democratic National Convention, 1992
    Youth & Student Protest - Democratic National Convention, 1996
    Youth & Student Protest - Dow Chemical Demonstrations
    Youth & Student Protest - France
    Youth & Student Protest - Free Universities
    Youth & Student Protest - Germany - Berlin
    Youth & Student Protest - Harvard University
    Youth & Student Protest - High School Underground
    Youth & Student Protest - High Schools
    Youth & Student Protest - High Schools - Ann Arbor
    Youth & Student Protest - High Schools - Resist High School Kit
    Youth & Student Protest - High Schools - Richardson, Ronald A.
    Youth & Student Protest - International Union of Students
    Youth & Student Protest - Labor Support
    Youth & Student Protest - May 2 Movement
    Youth & Student Protest - Mexico
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Ann Arbor Tribal Council
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Gargoyle
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - Rainbow People
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan       (1 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan       (2 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Black Action Movement       (1 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Black Action Movement       (2 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Graduate Action Alliance
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Michigan Daily
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Michigan Review
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Michigan Student Assembly
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Michigan Student Assembly - Peace & Justice Committee
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - PASE
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Student Communications Network
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - Students Organizing for Labor & Economic Equality (SOLE)
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Ann Arbor - University of Michigan - United Coalition Against Racism
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Michigan Youth Congress
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - Wayne State University
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - White Panthers
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - White Panthers - Plamondon, Genie
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - White Panthers - Plamondon, Pun (Lawrence)
    Youth & Student Protest - Michigan - White Panthers - Sinclair, John (Clippings)
    Youth & Student Protest - Miscellaneous
    Youth & Student Protest - National Student Association
    Youth & Student Protest - National Student League
    Youth & Student Protest - New University Conference
    Youth & Student Protest - Newark Community Union Project
    Youth & Student Protest - Northern Student Movement   (1 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Northern Student Movement   (2 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - NSM - Harlem Education Project
    Youth & Student Protest - Ohio - Kent State University        (1 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Ohio - Kent State University        (2 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Our Generation Kit - A
    Youth & Student Protest - Our Generation Kit - B
    Youth & Student Protest - Our Generation Kit - C
    Youth & Student Protest - Our Generation Kit - D
    Youth & Student Protest - Progressive Student Network
    Youth & Student Protest - Radical Education Project   (1 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Radical Education Project   (2 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - Revolutionary Student Brigade
    Youth & Student Protest - Rising Up Angry
    Youth & Student Protest - Rock Aganist the Right
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - "Mother Baines Snake Oil Elixer" - Poster
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Bibliography
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - CAW
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Constitution & Organization, Chapters and Finances
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Conventions, 1962-
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Conventions, 1962-
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Council & Conferences
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - ERAP
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - History
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Labor Committees
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Constitutions, Platform, Meeting Minutes   (1 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Constitutions, Platform, Meeting Minutes   (2 of 2)
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Program & Demonstration Fliers, 1962 -1965
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Program & Demonstration Fliers, 1966-
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - SGC Campaign & Election Materials
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Michigan - Voice
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Ohio
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Peace Research Education Project
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - PEP
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Progressive Labor Party
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Protests & Demonstrations
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Radical Education Project (REP)
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Reunion, 1987
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam       (1 of 5)
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam       (2 of 5)
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam       (3 of 5)
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam       (4 of 5)
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Vietnam       (5 of 5)
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Work List Mailing, 1964-
    Youth & Student Protest - SDS - Worklists (Names & Addresses)
    Youth & Student Protest - SLATE
    Youth & Student Protest - Stoney Brook, University of New York at
    Youth & Student Protest - Student Press Law Center
    Youth & Student Protest - Student Research Facility
    Youth & Student Protest - Students for Social Equality
    Youth & Student Protest - U.S. National Student Association
    Youth & Student Protest - University Christian Movement
    Youth & Student Protest - Wayne Greene Defense Committee
    Youth & Student Protest - Wisconsin - Madison - Fine, David
    Youth & Student Protest - Yippies
    Youth & Student Protest - Yippies - Hoffman, Abbie
    Youth & Student Protest - Youth Against War & Fascism
    Youth & Student Protest - Youth Liberation
    Yugoslavia
    Zaire
    Zane, David
    Zinn, Howard
    Zubal, John T.
      http://www.lib.umich.edu/spec-coll/labadie/labsvfthmtst2.txt



    9003 -- Fabbri, Luce


    9003 --

     

    FACERIAS José Luis dit Face, Petro ou Petronio (1920-1957)

    1920 : Né à Barcelone le 6 JANVIER / JANUARY .

    Syndicat du Bois, et FIJL.
    Federación Ibérica de Juventudes Libertarias (FIJL)

    1936 : Il part pour le Front d’Aragon avec la colonne Ascaso, qui deviendra la 28° division. Il changera d’unité, mais fera toute la guerre dans le même secteur.

    1938 : Sa compagne aura une fille, elles disparaîtront, soit : lors de leur fuite vers la France ou dans les camps.

    1939 : Lors des derniers combats en Catalogne, il sera fait prisonnier, et séjournera dans plusieurs prisons. (Saragosse, Vitoria, Extremadure). Il finira dans un bataillon de transport à Barcelone comme chauffeur personnel de Baixas Palau, commandant du corps juridico-militaire.

    1945 : A sa libération, il rejoint la CNT dans le syndicat des industries graphiques, mais travaille comme garçon de café au bar de la Rotonde au pied du Tibidabo. Il est nommé Secrétaire de défense du Comité Régional Catalan en remplacement de Manuel Fernandez Rodriguez.

    1946 : Tout son temps libre, il le passe dans la clandestinité. Ainsi il est au mois de mars, un des plus actif membre du groupe de défense des quartiers centraux de Barcelone, il eut plusieurs compagnes mais dut rompre ses liaisons à cause de son activisme.

     

    FAI Fédération Anarchiste Ibérique

    1927 : créée à Valence.

     

    FALASCHI Fausto

    1936 : Appartiens à la FAI, d’origine italienne.

     

    FARGAS PELLICER Rafael

    Né à

     

    FERNANDEZ SANCHEZ Aurelio

     

    FERNANDEZ Juan

    Né à

    1919 : Délégué au Congrès national pour la région Nord.

     

    FERNANDEZ RODRIGUEZ Manuel ( )

    Né à (Andalousie)

    1939 : Arrêté le 28 octobre, il séjournera dans la prison de Pueblo Nuevo de Barcelone, dont il sortira en février 1942.

    1945 : Secrétaire du Comité Régional de Catalogne pour la FIJL. (Federación Ibérica de Juventudes Libertarias (FIJL))

     

    FARRAS Eduardo

    Né à

    Il est compromis dans l’attentat contre Alfonso XIII en France.

     

    FERRER Y GUARDIA Francisco

     

    FERRER Juan

    Né à

    1960 : Ecrit des références sur F. Barthe et sur le trentisme dans Solidaridad Obrera de Paris.

     

    FLORES Pedro (1908- )

    1908 : Né le 13 mai à Barajas de Mello, Cuenca, Espagne.

    Son père est ouvrier indépendant. Pas d’études dans son enfance. Il travaille avec son père jusqu’à 18 ans.

    1926 : Emigre à Tarrasa, près de Barcelone ; exerce divers métiers et commence à militer à la CNT-FAI.

    1932 : Participe à la prise de la Mairie de Tarrasa, mais il peut se sauver en accord avec ses compagnons avant l’arrivée de l’armée.

    1935 : Vendeur sur les marchés peu avant la guerre.

    Peu avant le coup d’état de 36, il tente de se rendre maître de la mairie de Tarrasa avec un groupe de militants, mais il doit fuir pour échapper à la garde civile. Certains de ses amis sont emprisonnés.

    1936 : Incorporé à la colonne Durruti, il part pour l’Aragon (Farlete).Il est blessé au bras. Il est évacué sur la Catalogne.

    1937 : Se marie.

    1939 : Réfugié en France, il doit laisser sa famille en Espagne sans nouvelles. Il passe par le camp d’Argeles. Il fait plusieurs incursions en Espagne, puis revient en France.

    1944 : Il s’évade du camp de Gurs avec la complicité de certains gardiens avertis d’un projet de déportation des espagnols vers l’Allemagne. Dans ce camp, il y avait aussi des internés juifs et allemands antinazis. Se réfugie à Toulouse, puis à Montpellier

    1947 : Sa famille le rejoint en traversant la frontière clandestinement.

    1945 : Lors de la scission de la CNT il ne prend pas parti, mais fréquente la tendance "réformiste ", celle de Cipriano Mera, qu’il rejoindra.

    Bibliographie : il y a au CAD une vidéo d’interview tournée par A. Pobo.

     

    FOLCH Ramon

    Né à

    1932 : Pour protester contre la déportation en Afrique de 104 libertaires sur le bateau " Buenos Aires ", des grèves et révoltes se firent jour sur toute l’Espagne. A Tarrasa, la CNT prit d’assaut la mairie et résista, armes à la main, jusqu’à l’arrivée de l’armée. Il fut procédé à l’emprisonnement de quelques participants, dont Ramon.

     

    FOIX Pedro

    Né à

    192 ? : Signe comme Peiro le manifeste d’intelligence avec les républicains.

    1930 : rédacteur à Solidaridad Obrera.

    1939 : Exilé au Mexique.

    Auteur de : Apostols i mercaders 1957

     

    FONSECA F.

    Né à

     

    FORNELLS Ricardo

    Né à

    1919 : Délégué au Congrès national pour la région catalane.

    1931 : En août, il est signataire du Manifeste des "trente".

     

    FORTEA José

     

    FRANCO Amador (1920-1947)

    1920 : Né à Barcelone le 14 AVRIL / APRIL 14 .

    Tourneur sur Bois.

    De son vrai nom Diego Franco Cazorla, famille modeste, études primaires.

    1932 : Il fréquente l’Athénée rationaliste de la Torrasa à l’Hospitalet de Llobregat.

    1933 : Il milite aux Jeunesses Libertaires.

    1934-36 :Il est à la Federacion estudiantil de conciencias libres.

    1936 : Il participe à la création d’une Université populaire en juillet.

    1936 : Il part sur le front de Huesca avec la " Columna Roja y Negra " et participe à la défense des collectivisations en Aragon.

    1937 : Après les événements de mai, il entre au comité régional des JJLL. ( Section de propagande)

    1939 : Il se réfugie en France.

    1940 : Participe à la réorganisation de la CNT en exil. Circule entre la zone libre et la zone occupée par les allemands.

    1945-47 :Il fait plusieurs voyages clandestins en Espagne pour soutenir les maquis.

    1947 : Il est capturé et fusillé au printemps.

    http://www.chez.com/ascasodurruti/Biographies/biograF.htm


    9003 --

  • FREEDOM Newspaper2 in Gallery ADDED new article aGUSUT 2002, to update the Freedom Newspaper page.

    try pop up script in body (in templates?)

    code pop-up music or windows to switch from one page to another after 5-8 seconds

    Julia Vinograd poem. Add her photo from scan; post the page & add a "next" link from Dick's page. Or as part of a series, experimenting with new frontpage, in progress (probably in gallery?)

    email summary for past 4 months to send out to @ updates

    Iverson archive in datbase (& add links from poetry database):

    • Erich Muhsam Death of the Red Guardist UPDATE TO DO
    • Randolph bourne John Dos Passos UPDATE TO DO
    • grace paley UPDATE TO DO
    • Karl Shapiro Death of Emma Goldman UPDATE TO DO
    Encyclopedia, in database:
    • UPDATE TO DO Mainwaring. Nakov
    • Update Landauer page; add RA link, http://melior.univ-montp3.fr/ra_forum/en/landauer_gustav/
      ALSO add link to Gambone's article http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/Anarchist_Archives/bright/landauer/forcommunity.html

    • add E. F. Schumacher to bleed; or update any current entries; see http://www.suu.edu/scps/distance/durfee/review.smallisbeautiful.html
    • update http://recollectionbooks.com/bleed/Encyclopedia/PelloutierFernand.htm http://bubba.uta.edu/~econ2/facpages/baker.html
      on encyc?

      Roger Noel, aka Babar, of "Alternative Libertaire", Belgian-French critical magazine, lives.
      http://users.skynet.be/AL/

    • ADD TO NW (SEE ABE) Pilchuck Books, Everett, WA, Bucklin Hill Books, Bremerton, WA, U.S.A.
    • add to encyclopedia iverson daily bleed catalogs: Man ray, Philip Levine, Philip Lamantia, Creeley Kees, Robert Stock, Thomas Parkinson, artist Ronald Bladen, Sanders Russell, James Harmon, LEVERTOV?

    • MOLLIE STEIMER http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAsteimer.htm (text is saved in gallery; two entries
    • SEARCH DATABASE ON JAVA SCRIPT javascript
    • ditto for style sheets css
    • get html code to make templates database a visible page of code


      emma goldman

      Beloit College offers a wealth of public art scattered amongst the effigy mounds on campus. Fortunately, Beloit has found a friend in Siah Armajani, a particularly accomplished public artist of our time. Popular culture may know him best by his work for the torch lighting at the Atlanta Olympic Games, but he has created numerous sculptures, including "The Wood Family Fishing Bridge," the "Gazebo for One Anarchist: Emma Goldman," & "The Poetry Garden." http://www.npr.org/ramfiles/atc/20020305.atc.06.ram
      ?
      ?
      brecht ?


      9003 -- Hi folks,

      Below are the latest additions to the Struggle site. The big concentration this time around are documents from Libertarians against Nice which is calling for a No vote in the Nice referendum in Ireland on October 19th. There are also some reports of other Irish campaigns & a long report by an Irish anarchist on a speaking tour he did back in May for NEFAC.

      As always these pages can be accessed via http://struggle.ws/new.html Vote No to Nice on 19th October The text of the Libertarians Against Nice leaflet. 50,000 have been printed for distribution before October 19th PDF file of leaflet (red, black & white version) (black & white version)

      RTS on Baggot St. a great success [with pictures] Over 1,000 people took part in the four-hour party. Despite attempts by the Gardai to whip up a panic because the organisers refused to meet with them in advance of the party the day was trouble free & very good humoured.

      Sept 28 anti war demonstration in Dublin [with pictures] Two reports from WSM members of Saturdays anti Iraq war demonstration. An Irish Anarchist in the Northeast - Reflections on the North American Anarchist Movement In May Chekov Feeney of the WSM went on a speaking tour of the NE US & SE Canada for the North East Federation of Anarchist Communists (NEFAC). These are his reflections on the tour as published in their magazine. Press releases from Libertarians against Nice An archive of LAN press releases Libertarians against Nice launched Announcing the launch of the libertarian No to Nice campaign Libertarians against Nice to picket IBEC pro- Nice conference We intend to picket the conference organised by the Irish bosses federation Report on Libertarians against Nice picket of IBEC pro-Nice conference [with pictures] Members of LAN picketed the Irish Business & Employers Confederation (IBEC) pro-Nice conferenceconference at the Burlington Hotel at lunchtime today Libertarians against Nice to join anti-war march Members of Libertarians Against Nice will take part in tomorrows anti - (Iraq) war demonstration in Dublin. We will be protesting at the continued use of Irish airports by US military planes. Shannon refuelling reveals Seville declaration to be worthless Today's poll in the Irish Times shows Irish people are against war on Iraq by a margin of 2 to 1. So why are US warplanes being refuelled at Shannon airport & allowed to use Irish airspace? Low pay loving bosses to urge us to Vote Yes! The SFA are to be congratulated for letting the cat out of the bag by coupling whinging about a desultory increase in the minimum wage with calling for a Yes vote for Nice.



      9003 --

      Avelino Foscolo, começou em Minas Gerais, Reinaldo Frederico Greyer, no Rio Grande do Sul, Ricardo Gonçalves (tem uma rua com seu nome em São Paulo), Benjamin Mota, Edgard Edgard Leuenroth e João Penteado, em São Paulo; Orlando Corrêa Lopes, Francisco Viotti, Domingos Ribeiro Filho, Lima Barreto e José Oiticica, no Rio de Janeiro. De Portugal chegou Neno Vasco, um ilustre advogado, fez escola como anarquista em São Paulo (1901-1911), entre outros responsáveis pela sementeira anarquista no território brasileiro. // Avelino Foscolo, started in Minas Gerais, Reinaldo Frederico Greyer, in the Rio Grande Do Sul, Ricardo Gonçalves (it has a street with its name in São Paulo), Benjamin Mota, Edgard Edgard Leuenroth & Combed João, in São Paulo; Orlando Corrêa Lopes, Francisco Viotti, Sundays Ribeiro Filho, Lima Barreto & Jose Oiticica, in Rio De Janeiro. Of Portugal it arrived Neno Vasco, an illustrious lawyer, made school as anarchic in São Paulo (1901-1911), among others responsible for the anarchic catch-crop in the Brazilian territory. 1922 Morre o importante escritor Lima Barreto autor de livros como Triste Fim de Policarpo Quaresma, colaborador da imprensa operária e simpatizante anarquista. Terceiro Congresso Operário Nacional em Portugal reafirma o sindicalismo revolucionário. Fundação do Partido Comunista do Brasil, aderente à Terceira Internacional, entre os fundadores estão vários ex-anarquistas. Marcha sobre Roma dos fascistas italianos, leva Mussolini ao poder, desencadeando a repressão sobre o movimento operário e socialista. Em Salvador é fundada a Unión Obrera Salvadoreña, de tendência anarco-sindicalista e em Cuba a Federación Obrera de la Habana (FOH). Nos Estados Unidos morre, de forma suspeita, na prisão o anarquista mexicano Ricardo Flores Magón. No Chile é fundada uma nova organização anarco-sindicalista, Federación Obrera Regional de Chile (que desaparece em 1927) e vai coexistir com a IWW também sindicalista revolucionária.

      //The important writer Lima Barreto dies book author as Triste Fim  of Policarpo Quaresma, collaborator of the press operá anarchic sympathizer laughs and. Third Operá Congress; national river in Portugal reaffirms the unionism revolucioná river. Fundaç ã of the Communist Party of Brazil, adherent à The third International, between the founders estã vá rivers former-anarchists. March on Rome of the Italian fascists, takes Mussolini to the power, unchaining repressã on the movement operá socialist river and. In Salvador é established the Unió n Obrera Salvadoreñ , of tendê ncia anarco-syndicalist & in Cuba the Federació n Obrera of la Habana (FOH). In the United States it dies, of form suspicion, in prisã the Mexican anarchic o Ricardo Flores Magón. In Chile é established a new organizaç ã the anarco-syndicalist, Federació n Regional Obrera of Chile (that it disappears in 1927)   e goes to coexist with the IWW també syndicalistic m revolucioná it laughs. http://www.agrorede.org.br/ceca/edgar/cronA.html http://recollectionbooks.com/bleed/ArchiveMirror/ArquivoDeHistóriaSocialEdgarRodrigues/BrasilAn.html


      9004 -- To: recall@eskimo.com Hi, this is Colleen, Stan's daughter. I just wanted to let you know you spelled my mom's name wrong. It' Lauri, not Laurie.


      (en) History of Anarchism in Melbourne Australia Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002

      From: Shevek

      Historical Overview of Anarchism in Melbourne http://www.takver.com/history/melb/index.htm

      pulls together many of the stories & people involved in the anarchist movement in Melbourne over the last 116 years or so. This is a first attempt to give a broard overview of the many anarchists, publications, organisations & events in Melbourne, primarily up to about 1975, with links to some more recent events.

      The Melbourne Anarchist Archives: Drafts & Documents 1966-1973 http://www.takver.com/history/melb/maa01.htm

      provides substantial information on the theoretical development of anarchism in Melbourne for the Melbourne/La Trobe current, as well as current issues & debates at the time including: Conscription, Maoism, Anti-war, support for the NLF, student protest, May Day, Workers' Control, the Moratorium movement, Czechoslovakia, Student action for Education.

      Carnival Anarchism 1970-1975 http://www.takver.com/history/melb/carnival1970_75.htm The other major anarchist current in Melbourne 1970 to 1975 was what was loosely termed 'carnival anarchism', which includes the stories of the Collingwood Freestore & Australia's first free Legal Aid Service.

      Takver www.takver.com ?


      articles to save/mirror http://www.skysail.clara.net/archive.html



      ?
      ?


      9005 --

      CONTINUAR LA OBRA DE CAPPELLETTY IV

      1914 Los anarquistas se pronuncian contra la guerra de todos los países
      latinoamericanos. Un congreso obrero logra la fusión de la CORA (sindicalista)
      con la FORA (anarquista) en Buenos Aires. La revista libertaria A Vida de Correa
      Lopes inicia su campaña antibelicista. En Porto Alegre los anarquistas fundan la
      "Liga antimilitarista". En Sao Paulo se efectúa un Encuentro de Agrupaciones
      Anarquistas del Brasil. Al salir de la cárcel, Flores Magón continúa su lucha por
      darle un sentido socialista y libertario a la Revolución mexicana. La Casa del
      Obrero Mundial edita Emancipación Obrera y es asaltada por la policía de Huerta.
      Sale Tinta Roja. Pedro Prado publica La reina de Rapa Nui. En Lima, se edita el
      periódico La Lucha; en Puno, La Voz del Obrero.

      De 1914 hata 1921 Biófilo Panclasta cumple prisión en cárceles venezolanas.

      V. Brás, presidente de Brasil; Benavídez, de Perú; V. Carranza, de México, O.
      Zamor, de Haití; Márquez Bustillos, de Venezuela. Inauguración del Canal de
      Panamá. Los infantes de marina norteamericanos desembarcan en Veracruz y en
      Port au Prince. Villa y Zapata contra Carranza.
      Manuel Gálvez: La maestra normal; J. Rosales: Bajo el cielo dorado; A. Díaz
      Guerra: Lucas Guevara; Vargas Vila: La muerte del cóndor; A. Aguirre Morales:
      Flor de ensueño; R. Darío, Canto a la Argentina; E. Arroyo Lameda: Momentos; V.
      Huidobro: Manifiesto; R. Arévalo Martínez: El hombre que parecía un caballo; El
      trovador colombiano; M.H. Escuder: El diablillo del amor.

      1915 Se reúne el noveno congreso de la FORA en el cual se produce una
      escisión entre anarquistas y sindicalistas puros. En Montevideo empieza a
      publicarse La Batalla, más tarde portavoz del anarco-bolchevismo. Se reúne en
      Río de Janeiro un Congreso Anarquista Sudamenricano. Se declara ilegal la
      prensa anarquista y varios militantes españoles son expulsados de Cuba. Los anarquistas firman en Veracruz un pacto con el gobierno de Carranza y forman
      los "batallones rojos", para darle apoyo militar. La Casa del Obrero Mundial se
      multiplica en el interior de México y saca el periódico Ariete. En Rosario se edita
      la revista de Estudios; en Paraná, Ideas; en Campana, Voces Proletarias.
      Alberto Ghiraldo publica su libro La Ley Baldón.

      J. Pardo, presidente de Perú; Viera, de Uruguay. Arévalo Cedeño insurge contra
      J.V. Gómez en Venezuela. Tratado ABC (Argentina, Brasil, Chile). Tropas
      norteamericanas en Haití y Rep. Dominicana. Ley que establece libertad de cultos
      en Perú. Se funda en Cuba la Unión Antillana. S. Dartiguenave, presidente de Haití.
      Almafuerte: Evangélicas; R. Güiraldes: El cencerro de cristal; B. Fernández
      Moreno: Las iniciales del misal; C. Gónzalez Peña: La fuga de la quimera; Max
      Henríquez Ureña: Episodios dominicanos; J. Braschi: La ülcera; E. Barrios: El
      niño que enloqueció de amor; R. Blanco Fombona: El hombre de oro; A. Marasso:
      La canción olvidada; Ernesto Herrera: El caballo del comisario.

      1916 En México se disuelven los "batallones rojos"; se realiza en Veracruz un
      Congreso Obrero Nacional del cual nace la Federación del Trabajo de la Región
      Méxicana, narco-sindicalista. Se cierra la Casa del Obrero Mundial.
      Flores Magón es condenado a 20 años de prisión en Estados Unidos por
      su posición anti- belicista. En argentina la FORA del quinto (anarquista) se
      enfrenta a la FORA del noveno (sindicalista). En Santa Fe se edita La Verdad;
      en Mar del Plata, El Grito del Pueblo; en Bahía Blanca, Brazo y Cerebro. Fernando
      Santiván publica su novela La hechizada.

      Hipólito Yrigoyen, presidente de Argentina; José Luis Sanfuentes, de Chile; R.
      Bentín, de Perú; Menocal, otra vez, de Cuba. Invasión norteamericana a Santo
      Domingo. El papa Benedicto XV otorga una alta condecoración al dictador J.V.
      Gómez. Código civil brasileño.

      R. López Velarde: La sangre devota; R. Cardona, Oro de la mañana; Benito
      Lynch: Los caranchos de la Florida; Belisario Roldán: El rosal de las ruinas;
      Manuel Gálvez: El mal metafísico; Alfonsina Storni: La inquietud del rosal; M.
      Brull: La casa del silencio; P. Henríquez Ureña: El nacimiento de Dionisos; L.M.
      Urbaneja Achelpohl: En este país; Azuela: Los de abajo; Eguren: La canción de
      las figuras.

      1917 En México se reorganiza el grupo "Luz" y nacen numerosas agrupaciones
      libertarias, como "Solidaridad", "Los Autónomos", "Jóvenes socialistas rojos", etc.
      En el segundo Congreso Obrero Nacional los anarquistas son derrotados por Luis
      Morones y los reformistas pro-gubernamentales. Se edita en Sao Paulo, A Plebe;
      en Río de Janeiro, O Debate; en Alagoas, A Semana Social. Huelga general en
      Sao Paulo Y Santos. Edgard Leuenroth encarcelado como promotor de la misma, es
      defendido por Evaristo de Morais, quien escribe: O Anarquismo no Tribunal do
      Júri. Se edita en Buenos Aires La Rivolta (en italiano); en San Juan, Humanidad;
      en Junín, Nubes Rojas; en Bahía Blanca, Alba Roja. Antillí y González Pacheco
      publican en Buenos Aires el semanario La Obra. Carlos Días da a luz A Luta
      Socialista Revolucionaria.
      Brasil entra en la Guerra Mundial. F. Tinoco dictador de Costa Rica; Venustiano
      Carranza, presidente de México.
      Ejecutivo colegiado de Uruguay. Perú y Uruguay rompen relaciones con
      Alemania. Puerto Rico convertido en territorio norteamericano (Jones Act): varios
      millares de sus ciudadanos deben marchar a la guerra europea.

      José Vasconcelos: El monismo estético; Ricardo Rojas: Historia de la literatura
      argentina; E. Berisso: Con las alas rotas; Rafael Alberto Arrieta: Las noches de
      oro; R. López Velarde: Zozobra; C. Sabat Ercasty: Pantheos; J. Torri: Ensayos y
      poemas; J.M. Pichardo: Tierra adentro; Alfonso Reyes: Visión de Anáhuac, Ureta:
      El dolor pensativo.

      Enero de 1918, en las ciudades costeras Colombianas de Cartagena,
      Barranquilla, y Santa Marta se efectuaron varias huelgas cuyos desarrollos
      tuvieron un marcado acento Anarquista. La acción directa y el sabotaje lograron
      inclinar la balanza a favor de los obreros, la patronal tuvo que un aumento salarial
      del 50%. Este breve momento huelguístico dio origen a un fértil periodo de
      agitación social en todo el país donde las tácticas Anarcosindicalistas como la
      Acción directa, la propaganda por la acción, el sabotaje, los grupos de choque y
      las huelgas de solidaridad fueron las mas utilizadas.-

      1918 En el Tercer Congreso Obrero Nacional de Saltillo los anarquistas
      mexicanos son minoría y Morones funda la Confederación Obrera Regional
      Mexicana (CROM). Los anarquistas brasileños crean los "Comités Populares"
      contra la carestía de la vida. Oreste Ristori edita en Buenos Aires el periódico
      anticlerical El Burro; Del Intento, en La Plata, Ideas. Horacio Quiroga publica
      Cuentos de la selva.

      Marco Fidel Suárez, presidente de Colombia. Agitación estudiantil contra la
      dictadura en Venezuela. En Perú, ley de enseñanza gratuíta y obligatoria.
      Promulgación de la nueva constitución uruguaya. Rodriguez Alves por segunda
      vez presidente de Brasil. Reforma Universitaria en Córdoba (Argentina). Nueva
      constitución en Haití. Vicente Huidobro: Ecuatorial, Poemas árticos; J. González
      Castillo: La mujer de Ulises; F. Defilippis Novoa: El diputado de mi pueblo;
      Alfonsina Storni: El dulce daño; Pedro M. Obligado: Gris; J.M. Poveda: Versos
      precursores; César Vallejo: Los heraldos negros; J.R. Pocaterra: Tierra del sol
      amada; J.E. Lossada: Madréporas; Valdelomar: El caballero Belmonte; Azuela:
      Las moscas:

      1919 Se produce en Buenos Aires "la semana trágica", tras una huelga
      metalúrgica protagonizada por la FORA anarquista. Esta publica Tribuna
      Proletaria. Un nuevo diario, Bandera Roja, representa la tendencia anarco-
      bolchevique. La Protesta tiene un tiraje de 15.000 ejemplares. Los anarco-
      sindicalistas fundan en Chile la IWW. Los mineros de Huanuni (Bolivia), guiados
      por os anarquistas, conquistan la jornada de ocho horas. Los anarquistas
      peruanos organizan "el paro del hambre" y promueven huelgas en El Callao,
      Chosica, etc. La FORP reorganizada emite una declaración de principios y se
      define anarcosindicalista. La FORU agrupa a 49 sindicatos y federaciones
      obreras. Se funda en Brasil el Partido Comunista Libertario. En Río se publican
      Spartacus y O Germinal; en Santa Fe, La Campana. González Pacheco publica
      su libro Carteles; Edgar Edgard Leuenroth, O que é o maximalismo ou bolchevismo.

      Epitácio Pessoa, presidente de Brasil; J. Gutiérrez Guerra, de Bolivia. Leguía,
      dictador de Perú. Zapata muere en una emboscada. Fundación del Partido
      Socialista colombiano. El general Peñaloza invade Venezuela, contra la
      dictadura de J.V. Gómez. Ch. Perlate se levanta en Haití.
      C. Iglesias Paz: El vuelo nupcial; Julio F. Escobar: El hombre que sonríe; Manuel
      Gálvez: Nacha Regules; L. Vallenilla Lanz, Cesarismo democrático; A. Zum Felde:
      Proceso histórico del Uruguay; A. Nervo: La amada inmóvil; Luis A. Sánchez: Los
      poetas de la revolución; A. Hidalgo: Jardín zoológico; R. López Velarde: Zozobra;
      E. Crosa: El sagrado delito.

      1920 Se publican en Buenos Aires periódicos anarquistas favorables a la
      revolución bolchevique: Frente Proletario y Frente Unico. La FORA anarquista
      reúne un congreso extraordinario con asistencia de 200 sociedades obreras. El
      Soldado es órgano antimilitarista. En Santiago de Chile los "patriotas" asaltan la
      Federación de Estudiantes, de tendencia anarquista. Se publica en Asunción del
      Paraguay la revista libertaria Renovación. Un congreso obrero nacional reunido
      en Lima adopta la ideología anarquista. Se crean en Perú las universidades
      populares "Manuel González Prada", muy concurridas en un principio por los
      obreros libertarios. En Río, Oititica y Fábio Luz publican en A Voz do Povo. El
      primero de ellos formula sus críticas a la revolución bolchevique en una serie de
      artículos titulada Mau Caminho. En Sao Paulo se edita A Patuleía. Se reúne en
      Rïo el Tercer Congreso Obrero Brasileño, con asistencia de 150 delegados. Un
      grupo de anarquistas funda en Ecuador el "Centro Gremial Sindicalista" (CGS), el
      cual publica El Proletario. González Pacheco edita en Buenos Aires El Libertario.
      Astrogildo Pereira, el libro A Greve de Leopoldina; Neno Vaso, Concepçao
      Anarquista do Sindicalismo.

      Muere Carranza en Tlaxcalantongo. Interinato de DE la Huerta y elección de
      Alvaro Obregón, como presidente de México. Arturo Alessandri, presidente de
      Chile; J.L.Tamayo, de Ecuador. Nueva Constitución peruana. Frustrado golpe de
      los colorados riveristas de Uruguay. Se dicta en Venezuela la primera ley de
      petróleos. Se inicia en México una paulatina y parcial reforma agraria.

      Emilio Rabasa: La evolución histórica de México; González Castillo y Martínez
      Cuitiño: La santa madre; Juana de Ibarbourou: Raíz salvaje; Carmen Lyra: Los
      cuentos de mi tía Panchita; J. Stefanich: Aurora; A.L. Moock: La serpiente; R.
      Gallegos: El último Solar; F. Paz Castillo: La huerta de Doñana; A. Korn: La
      libertad creadora.

      1921 Gran huelga de La Forestal en el Chaco argentino, apoyada por la FORA. El
      ejército argentino masacra a los trabajadores de la Patagonia, organizados por los
      anarcosindicalistas. En Río de Janeiro se editan el diario A Vanguarda, dirigido
      por Edgard Leuenroth, y la revista Renovaçao de Marques de Costa. Anarquistas y
      marxistas fundan en México la Confederación General de Trabajadores (CGT),
      con medio centenar de sindicatos. En su seno surge el Centro Sindicalista
      Libertario (CSL). González Pacheco funda el semanario La Antorcha; en General
      Pico sale Pampa Libre; en buenos Aires, El Sol; en Montevideo, Trabajo, La Ruta,
      Tribuna Libertaria e Ideas y Estudios. José Martín da a luz Historia das Riquezas
      do Clero Católico e Protestante. González Pacheco estrena su drama Hijos del
      Pueblos.

      J. Holguín, presidente de Colombia; A. Zayas, de Cuba. En Perú se
      reúne un Congreso indígena. En México Vasconcelos asume el ministerio de Educación.
      Conferencia Panamericana en La Habana. Se funda el Partido comunista argentino y el
      boliviano. El partido socialista del Uruguay se convierte en Partido
      Comunista. D. Moreno Jiménes: Psalmos; J.L.Bengoa: Los sacrificados; Andrés
      Eloy Blanco: Tierras que me oyeron; F. Silva Valdés: Agua del tiempo; C. Wyld
      Ospina: Las dádivas simples; R. Hurtado: La hora de ámbar; A. Fernández
      García: Bucares en flor; Valdelomar: Los hijos del sol; De la Riva Agüero: El Perú
      hostórico y artístico.

      1922 La FORA del noveno congreso, unida con algunos gremios de la FORA del
      quinto, origina la Unión Sindical Argentina (USA). En A Plebe de Sao Paulo se
      publica un manifiesto contra "el comunismo de Estado". Aparece en Guayaquil el
      órgano libertario Redención. Se fundan la Unión Obrera Salvadoreña, en la cual
      predominan los anarcosindicalistas, y la Federación Obrera de La Habana (FOH),
      también anarquista. Muere Flores Magón en una prisión norteamericana. La CGT
      mexicana se declara antipolítica y se enfrenta con el Partido Comunista. Los
      anarquistas organizan en México y Veracruz una huelga de inquilinos. Se reúne el
      Segundo Congreso de la C.G.T. En Tandil se edita La Verdad; en Ingeniero
      White, Mar y tierra; en Necochea, Nuestra Tribuna. Alberto Ghiraldo publica La Argentina:
      Estado social de un pueblo.

      A. Bernardes, presidente de Brasil; Marcelo T. DeAlvear, de Argentina; P. Ospina,
      de Colombia; L. Borno, de Haití; J.B. Vicini de Rep. Dominicana. Primer pozo
      petrolero en el Zulia. Venezuela debe ceder a Colombia una buena parte de la
      península de Goajira ante el arbitraje suizo.

      Oliveiro Girondo: Veinte poemas para ser leídos en el trabajo

      http://recollectionbooks.com/anow/world/la/argentina/

      9005 -- Organization: Recollection Used Books Subject: Julia Vinograd's poem "For Dick Ellington" Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2002 13:55:28 -0700 (PDT) From: Debra Khattab To: David Brown Dear Mr. Brown,

      My name is Debra Grace Khattab, I'm a friend of Julia Vinograd's & run a poetry series in Oakland, CA called Word Beat. She asked me to email a reply to you about your request to post her poem "For Dick Ellington" on the internet as part of your dedicated Dick Ellington page.

      The following is a transcript of her handwritten letter: David Brown - I don't speak computer so I am giving permission for you to use my poem "For Dick Ellington, Berkeley Typesetter" & my friend Debbie will send this along on her computer.

      I liked Dick very much, I hope my poem reminds his friends of him.

      Thank you for your interest.

      Julia Vinograd

      From the letter Julia gave me to read, I gather that Robert Lichtman has already sent you a copy of Julia's poem. If you have any other questions, please feel free to either contact me through this email address which I use for the poetry reading, sciaf@yahoo.com, or write Julia at her address.

      Sincerely,

      Debra Grace Khattab, Word Beat host 2nd Saturdays http://www.angelfire.com/poetry/wordbeat





      9005 -- Slums, Sleuths & Anarchists:

      Gender issues in the work of George R. Sims

      ----- Chris Willis

      This is work in progress. I would be grateful for any comments. Please e-mail me at chris@chriswillis.freeserve.co.uk

      Anarchist fiction

      Sims also wrote in another popular genre, Anarchist fiction. At the turn of the century the sinister Anarchist or Nihilist was a familiar figure in popular literature, reflecting middle-class fears about immigration & the growth of Socialism. Anarchism, Nihilism & Socialism were regarded by the bourgeoisie as virtually synonymous. During the 1870s & 1880s various Socialist & revolutionary exiles from the Continent had settles in London, to the concern of the authorities. In July 1881, a congress of Socialist revolutionaries & Anarchists was held in London, but received little popular attention at the time, public opinion being more occupied with the Fenian terrorist threat (76). By the mid-1880s, however, Socialism had become a force which could not be ignored. Meetings in Hyde Park attracted large numbers on a scale which has not been seen since the Chartist demonstrations of the 1840s (77). The popular press attempted to link the growing threat of Socialism with the terrorist & anarchist political assassinations & explosions which had taken place in Europe over the previous five years. Anarchists were rumoured to be active among the British working classes following the death of a supposed anarchist in an explosion at Greenwich Park in 1894, an incident which is now famous as the basis for Conrad's novel The Secret Agent (78). One of the contributors to Sims' Living London gave a sympathetic portrait of a "Socialistic gathering" (79) of Russians in East London, which appears to be of a social rather than Socialist nature, but such a tolerant view is relatively rare. By the turn of the century the sinister secret agent (usually of Eastern or Central European origin) was almost a cliché in popular fiction.

      Sims' 1916 novel Anna of the Underworld is set just before the First World War. As well as sinister secret agents, it features other two staples of popular fiction: the beautiful nurse-heroine & the equally beautiful villainous adventuress. Moya Havering is an impoverished aristocrat who would have inherited her father's estate & fortune if she had been a boy. She makes her living as a nurse under the name Mina Holmes. Her credentials as heroine are immediately established by her alias & profession. Not only does her surname link her with fiction's most famous detective, but her Christian name is that of the woman who defeated one of fiction's most famous villains: Mina Harker was one of the band who killed Dracula (80). As discussed above, nursing was perhaps the most acceptable of professions for a middle-class woman. Moya's branch of nursing is particularly specialised: she nurses alcoholic millionaires or, as Sims puts it, "wealthy reprobates, vicious men who are the victims of drunken orgies" (81). Moya is suicidal because of a disastrous love affair with Vincent Frayne, a fortune-hunting bigamist. (Bigamy is a recurring theme in Sims' fiction.) She tries to kill herself by throwing herself in front of a car, but she is uninjured. The car's driver is Stella Barrasford, a rich & beautiful young woman who is "employed in the Secret Service of a great Continental Power" (82). Stella is struck by Moya's strong physical resemblance to Anna Elmar, "one of the best agents the Secret Service ever had [who] had at her command the most skilful band of criminals on the Continent" (83). Anna is currently in hiding following a secret marriage to Stella's brother.

      Stella persuades Moya to impersonate Anna, telling her that secret service work will offer her the opportunity to get her revenge on the male sex for the wrongs done her by Vincent Frayne. She maintains a discreet silence about Anna's criminal connections. Moya eagerly takes on Anna's identity, & engages Ruby Lee, another of Frayne's victims as her maid. She tells Ruby:

      "I want to help all women who suffer wrong at the hands of men. I am one of the rebels, Ruby - one of the rebels against man-made laws that deny to women the rights & privileges they give to men ... I am one of the avengers of my sex." (84)

      Stella encourages Moya in this belief, telling her, "for all the injury you had suffered you might have a glorious revenge ... it is your duty to your womanhood remember & revenge" (85) but in fact she is using Moya for her own political ends. Stella's hatred of men is genuine & in the best tradition of adventuresses, she plans to marry a rich man for his money. The man concerned is the male relative who inherited Moya's father's fortune, so the marriage will enable both women to obtain revenge.

      Moya's career as an avenger of her sex comes to a halt when she realises the spy ring's true purpose, & she decides to act as a double agent. Meanwhile, her hatred of men is ameliorated when she falls in love with Basil Grey, a man who is remarkably like Sims himself, though considerably younger. He is:

      "an author & quite a clever young fellow. He writes novels & plays, & he has been writing some remarkable articles in the Daily Telegraph on the Underworld of London - the hidden side of London life." (86)

      The self-referential joke is heightened by Basil's plans to put Moya & Stella in a novel he is writing. Love & patriotism combine to make Moya think better of her plans to wreak a feminist revenge on the male sex.

      Sims also deals with the secret service in some of his short stories. "Alec the Actor" (86) recounts the exploits of members of the "Anarchist's Club" in the East End. A group of criminal Anarchists plan a jewel robbery. They are ambushed by the police, but one of them, the eponymous Alec, escapes to Moscow where he then betrays a large number of his fellow Anarchists to the police. It transpires that he is in fact a police spy. the story is told from the point of view of his lover Anna Pertrovna, a Russian tailoress living in London. She believes Alec to be a genuine Anarchist. Although she is heavily pregnant, her Anarchist friends disown her when they discover Alec's true employment, thinking she must also be a spy, and she kills herself.

      In "Why He Was Hanged" (88) another beautiful young woman suffers as a result of her involvement with Anarchists and their suspicions. Esther Jakobowski is:

      "a member of that society which has its agents amongst the poorest daughters & amongst the richest butterflies of fashion, among the natives of every capital at home. She was in the pay of the Russian police - or, rather, she was suspected of being so.

      One day, this woman, who had been followed & watched by members of the society in London, was denounced at a meeting & condemned to death." (89)

      The message seems clear: women who involve themselves in revolutionary politics come to a sticky end. Perhaps this is a reflection of popular attitudes towards the campaigners for women's suffrage. In this era, women were becoming increasingly involved in the public sphere, despite male opposition, & Suffragettes had been on the receiving end of much male violence, often including police brutality (90). As Eileen Sypher points out, Anarchist & proto-feminist threats are often linked in Anarchist fiction (91).

      There appear to be two distinct sub-genres of Anarchist fiction. The first, which has strong links with slum fiction, is set among the working classes & echoes middle-class fears of a working-class revolution. Sims' short stories fall into this category, as does the best-known example of the genre, Conrad's The Secret Agent. The second has mainly middle or upper-class characters. In the latter, the beautiful adventuress of the sensation novel is relocated in a political context. Sims' Stella Barrasford is a direct descendant of Lady Audley & her ilk. The adventuress now looks for political as well as personal gain. Sexual & political immorality are often linked: the political adventuress is a glamourous woman who preys on men & has many lovers. This connection is also made in Sims' journalism: in London By Night he suggests that some foreign prostitutes working in London are in fact spies (92). The sexually assertive woman thus becomes a threat to the welfare of the State.

      http://www.chriswillis.freeserve.co.uk/sims.htm


      9005 -- Anarchist archivist Lew Rockwell


      9005 -- Liberty published the original work of Lysander Spooner, Auberon Herbert, Victor Yarros, & Lillian Harman, daughter of the free love anarchist, Moses Harman. Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



      9005 -- Eduardo Barriobero y Herrán (1875-1939)

      http://www.cnt.es/fal/Bicel14/images/11.jpg http://www.cnt.es/fal/Bicel14/22.htm
      http://www.cnt.es/fal/Bicel14/8.htm

      9006 -- —Floyd Turner, the young man who two decades ago c